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  • Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

    DJIBOUTI (AFP) - The tiny Red Sea state of Djibouti reported east Africa's first human case of the deadly H5N1 deadly bird flu strain and said some chickens were also infected.
    <SCRIPT type=text/javascript>if (window.yzq_a == null) document.write("<scr" + "ipt type=text/javascript src=""http://us.js2.yimg.com/us.js.yimg.com/lib/bc/bc_1.7.3.js></scr" + "ipt>");</SCRIPT><SCRIPT type=text/javascript>if (window.yzq_a){yzq_a('p', 'P=.KfD8ESOwhXB2l5HQ7xnsxNRpkY4yURjYTsABIzS&T=19k9 9aor4%2fX%3d1147363643%2fE%3d95959686%2fR%3dnews%2 fK%3d5%2fV%3d1.1%2fW%3d8%2fY%3dYAHOO%2fF%3d1834688 540%2fH%3dY2FjaGVoaW50PSJuZXdzIiBjb250ZW50PSJBZnJp Y2E7Zmx1O2hlYWx0aDt2aXJ1cztpdDtIZWFsdGg7cmVmdXJsX2 15X3lhaG9vX2NvbSIgcmVmdXJsPSJyZWZ1cmxfbXlfeWFob29f Y29tIiB0b3BpY3M9InJlZnVybF9teV95YWhvb19jb20i%2fS%3 d1%2fJ%3d40C28E44');yzq_a('a', '&U=1391mcfqk%2fN%3d4vO8U9G_Rvs-%2fC%3d431704.8275385.9169236.1414694%2fD%3dLREC%2 fB%3d3503658');}</SCRIPT><NOSCRIPT>http://us.bc.yahoo.com/b?P=.KfD8ESOw...%2fB%3d3503658</NOSCRIPT>
    The health ministry said that virology tests from samples of an infected person taken last month were positive for the virulent strain of the flu virus, which had also affected three domestic fowl.
    "Tests from a person suffering from flu-like symptoms on April 27 were positive for the disease," it said. "Three domestic hens were also affected by the virus."
    The ministry said the tests were carried out with the collaboration of the World Health Organisation at a laboratory in Cairo.
    Djibouti is the first country in east Africa to report the appearance of the H5N1 virus in either birds or humans and the eighth on the African continent to find the strain in birds.
    Egypt is the only other country in Africa where people have been infected by the disease, of whom five have died.


    http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20060511...lthfludjibouti
    http://novel-infectious-diseases.blogspot.com/

  • #2
    Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

    Djibouti is a small coutry between Somalia and Ethiopia.

    Population 680 000h (very small)

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

      Thanks Al and Mingus.
      "May the long time sun
      Shine upon you,
      All love surround you,
      And the pure light within you
      Guide your way on."

      "Where your talents and the needs of the world cross, lies your calling."
      Aristotle

      “In a gentle way, you can shake the world.”
      Mohandas Gandhi

      Be the light that is within.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

        Commentary at

        http://www.recombinomics.com/News/05..._Djibouti.html

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

          And, no bf in Yemen, eh...?
          ...when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth. - Sherlock Holmes

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

            http://www.recombinomics.com/News/05..._Djibouti.html
            Commentary

            H5N1 Bird Flu Confirmed in Patient and Poultry in Djibouti

            Recombinomics Commentary

            May 11, 2006

            The health ministry said that virology tests from samples of an infected person taken last month were positive for the virulent strain of the flu virus, which had also affected three domestic fowl.

            "Tests from a person suffering from flu-like symptoms on April 27 were positive for the disease," it said. "Three domestic hens were also affected by the virus."

            The ministry said the tests were carried out with the collaboration of the World Health Organisation at a laboratory in Cairo.

            The above confirmation of H5N1 bird flu in a patient in Djibouti raise additional concerns about the spread of H5N1 in people and poultry, and the failure to detect H5N1 in adjacent countries. Wild bird die-offs in adjacent southwest Yemen have been reported many times as have outbreaks in Ethiopia, Somalia, and Kenya. H5N1 has been repeatedly denied, but H5N1 confirmation in Sudan, Egypt, Jordan, Israel, Iraq, and Iran raises significant credibility issues.

            Similar credibility issues have become obvious due to reports from wildlife and wetland conservation groups as well as DEFRA. The groups, like countries adjacent to Djibouti have repeated cited negative bird flu data with no positive LPAI results to validate the collection and testing methodologies employed.

            These groups then use te false negatives to deny the transmission and transport of H5N1 by wild birds, although dozens of countries in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa have reported H5N1 for the first time. Included in the list of countries in Africa that confirmed H5N1 are Egypt, Sudan, Nigeria, Niger, Cameroon, Burkina Faso, and Ivory Coast.

            Media Link

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            • #7
              Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

              <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Baby in Djibouti diagnosed with bird flu





              GENEVA, Switzerland (AP) -- The World Health Organization said Thursday that a baby in Djibouti has contracted the H5N1 virus, the country's first human case of bird flu.
              "I believe the person is still alive. It's a 2-year-old girl," WHO spokesman Dick Thompson told The Associated Press in Geneva. He said the girl was confirmed as H5N1 positive by the U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit 3 (NAMRU-3) in Cairo, but could not provide any further details.
              The Djibouti government confirmed the human case in the capital and said three chickens also had been infected with the virus.
              "Djibouti thus becomes the first country in the Horn of Africa to have detected a human case and bird cases of H5N1," the government said on the official Djiboutian Information Agency web site.
              It was not clear from the government statement whether the case of the chickens was related to the human case.
              It also did not provide any details on the health of the girl, saying only that she was tested after showing flu symptoms on April 27.
              The Health Ministry said the infection occurred despite a heightened alert, but that the government would further increase surveillance of the disease. It told citizens to keep away from any birds showing symptoms of sickness.
              Djibouti is now the 10th country where a person has been infected with the deadly virus. At least 207 people have contracted the disease globally and 115 have died over the last three years, according to the U.N. health agency. Virtually all the individuals were exposed to the disease in poultry.
              As of April 27, there had been no reports of H5N1 in poultry or wild fowl in Djibouti, according to the Paris-based World Organization for Animal Health.
              Health experts fear the bird flu virus could mutate into a form easily spread among people, potentially sparking a pandemic.
              Copyright 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

              </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><!--Article End--><!--Bibliography Goes Here--><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD> </TD></TR><TR><TD bgColor=#cccccc></TD></TR><TR><TD> </TD></TR><TR><TD></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
              <!--Bibliography End--><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=font-cn> </TD></TR><TR><TD class=font-cn>Find this article at:
              http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/africa...uti.birdflu.ap

              </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

                http://www.promedmail.org/pls/promed..._ID:1000,32914

                <TABLE summary=""><TBODY><TR><TD noWrap align=right>Archive Number</TD><TD noWrap align=left>20060511.1347</TD></TR><TR><TD noWrap align=right>Published Date</TD><TD noWrap align=left>11-MAY-2006</TD></TR><TR><TD noWrap align=right>Subject</TD><TD noWrap align=left>PRO/AH/EDR> Avian influenza - worldwide (110): Djibouti, susp.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

                AVIAN INFLUENZA - WORLDWIDE (110): DJIBOUTI, SUSPECTED***************************************** *************A ProMED-mail post<http://www.promedmail.org>ProMED-mail is a program of theInternational Society for Infectious Diseases<http://www.isid.org>Date: Thu, 11 May 2006From: Joe Dudley <jdudley@eaicorp.com>Source: Reuters alertnet, 11 May 2006 [edited]<http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/L11478047.htm>One person and 3 chickens in Djibouti have tested positive for the deadly H5N1 avian influenza virus, Djibouti's health minister said on Thursday [11 May 2006]."One patient and 3 domestic chickens have been detected with the H5N1 virus," Abdallah Abdillahi Miguil said in remarks broadcast on state television.The patient in the tiny country of 300 000 at the mouth of the Red Sea is the first human case confirmed in the Horn of Africa, along the path of migratory birds who have been detected with the deadly strain.The results were tested in conjunction with the U.N. World Health Organisation at a laboratory in Egypt, the minister said. The condition of the patient, who the minister said was still in the hospital, was not immediately known.--ProMED-mail<promed@promedmail.org>[In line with the proverbial "one picture is worth 1000 words," a brief look at the map <http://www.countryreports.org/maps/Djibouti/dj-area.gif> should be enough to convince the skeptics that the recent statement that "H5N1 [was] not detected in a single wild bird out of thousands of samples collected in Africa this winter," followed by pacifying conclusions, deserve to be assessed with a critical view. With Egypt and Sudan infected, countries in the horn of Africa and in East Africa should be regarded as being at high risk, while avoiding complacency in more northern regions. The detection of 3 infected birds (kudos to the NAMRU lab in Cairo!) is alarming enough. Combined with a human case, it might signal the presence of a widely spread, established epizootic.Sudan reported to the OIE on 8 May as follows: "A new outbreak has been identified at Atbara, in River Nile State, 250 km to the north of Khartoum. New outbreaks have also been reported in Gezira State in 4 poultry farms located 40-50 km to the south of Khartoum town. For the full report, see <http://oie.int/eng/info/hebdo/A_CURRENT.HTM#Sec10>.Official confirmation and further details of the case and virus in Djibouti are anticipated.The FAO and the OIE have cooperatively published the document "Preparing for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza: A Manual for Countries at Risk". Its update of 16 Feb 2006 is available at<http://www.fao.org/docs/eims/upload/200354/HPAI_manual.pdf>. - Mod.AS].</PRE>
                "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

                  Siblings of Djibouti bird flu case being tested-WHO
                  12 May 2006 07:36:28 GMT
                  Source: Reuters

                  GENEVA, May 12 (Reuters) - A 2-year-old girl in Djibouti, the first confirmed human case of bird flu in East Africa, is in stable condition while three siblings undergo tests for possible infection, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Friday.

                  Djibouti Health Minister Abdallah Abdillahi Miguil said on Thursday in remarks broadcast on state television the girl had tested positive for the H5N1 virus.

                  The WHO, a United Nations agency, has accepted as valid the results from the girl's sample tested by a U.S. laboratory based in Egypt, according to WHO spokeswoman Maria Cheng.

                  "Three of her siblings are undergoing investigation for possible infection. Their samples have been sent to the same laboratory," Cheng told Reuters in Geneva.

                  The family lives in a poor, rural area of the tiny country near the border with Somalia and kept chickens, she added. The minister said the virus had been detected in three birds.

                  The WHO had sent supplies of the anti-viral Tamiflu, by Swiss drugmaker Roche <ROG.VX>, as well as personal protective equipment to try to prevent the spread of the deadly virus, Cheng said.

                  "We will send a support team if and when requested by the health ministry," she added.

                  The girl's symptoms began on April 23 and tests were conducted by the U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit 3 (NAMRU-3) in Cairo on May 10, Cheng said.

                  The girl remains under medical care in stable condition, Cheng said, adding: "She still has persistent symptoms, presumably fever and respiratory problems."

                  The WHO's office in Djibouti was helping authorities to tighten disease surveillance in the region, where outbreaks of dengue fever can complicate diagnosis, according to Cheng.

                  The WHO has confirmed 13 cases of bird flu in Egypt, including five fatalities, where outbreaks began in March.

                  In all, the WHO says there have been 208 cases in 10 countries, including Djibouti, since late 2003, and 115 deaths.

                  Experts fear that bird flu could mutate into a form that passes easily among humans, potentially triggering a pandemic in which millions could die.
                  http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/L12317721.htm

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

                    Commentary at

                    http://www.recombinomics.com/News/05...i_Cluster.html

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

                      http://www.recombinomics.com/News/05...i_Cluster.html
                      Commentary

                      Suspect H5N1 Bird Flu Cluster in Djibouti

                      Recombinomics Commentary

                      May 12, 2006

                      A 2-year-old girl in Djibouti, the first confirmed human bird flu case in sub-Saharan Africa, was in stable condition on Friday while three siblings had tests for possible infection, the World Health Organisation said.

                      "Three of her siblings are undergoing investigation for possible infection. Their samples have been sent to the same laboratory," Cheng told Reuters in Geneva.

                      "They have flu-like symptoms," she said.

                      The family lives in a poor, rural area of the tiny country near the border with Somalia and kept chickens, Cheng said.

                      The above comments indicate the index case for Djibouti may be part of a familial cluster. The index case is the youngest index case for a familial cluster or for a country. Since 2005, all index cases for a country (Cambodia, Indonesia, China, Turkey, Iraq, Azerbaijan) with the exception of Egypt, have been part of a familial cluster. Egypt is the only country without a H5N1 bird flu familial cluster.

                      The location of the family near the border of Somalia and its proximity to southwestern Yemen again highlight the fact that many countries in Africa and the Middle East continue to deny H5N1 infections in people of animals.

                      The denials are supported by media reports of the absence of H5N1 in thousands or tens of thousands of wild birds. However, there reports of negative data are supplied by wildlife or wetlands conservation groups who have yet to disclose any data on the detection of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) in the tested birds. Low pathogenic avian influenza is common in wild waterfowl, and negative H5N1 data in the absence of positive data on LPAI says little about the presence of H5N1, but speaks volumes about the groups collecting the samples and the media report the data, which includes conclusions that wild birds play a minor role in the spread of H5N1.

                      However, 12 months ago, prior to the outbreak of H5N1 in long range waterfowl at Qinghai Lake, there were no reported cases of H5N1 in Russia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Europe, the Middle East, or Africa. H5N1 was first reported in each of these areas in the past 12 months, and these reports have firmly linked the H5N1 infections to wild waterfowl. In Europe, where the surveillance is more effective, the initial reports of H5N1 have been from waterfowl infections, and many European countries have yet to report H5N1 in domestic poultry.

                      In Djibouti, where surveillance is less than ideal, H5N1 was first reported in the index case and domestic poultry. However, there have been persistent reports of large die-offs of waterfowl since the fall, although H5N1 infections have been denied, usually without an explanation for the bird deaths and without evidence of detection of LPAI in wild birds being tested.

                      Media Link

                      Map

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

                        http://www.irinnews.org/report.asp?R...untry=DJIBOUTI

                        DJIBOUTI, 12 May 2006 (IRIN) - Health authorities in Djibouti have reported the first human case of the deadly H5N1 bird flu strain.

                        In a radio and television address on Thursday, Djibouti’s health minister, Abdallah Abdillahi Miguil, announced that a young girl had been hospitalised with the H5N1 strain of the avian flu virus. Samples from other family members, who had shown flu-like symptoms, had been sent to the laboratory Namru III in Cairo, the Egyptian capital.

                        The patient comes from a small village, about 30km south of Djiboutiville, the capital. She is receiving treatment at Bouffard, a French military hospital.

                        Rumours of an outbreak of fever had been circulating in Djiboutiville since the beginning of April, according to an official from Djibouti’s health ministry. It was originally believed to be dengue fever or chikungunya, a mosquito-borne fever that has been reported recently in Mauritius and Reunion. The government, with the help of United States and French troops, and in collaboration with the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO), took several blood samples for testing.

                        A sample taken from the child, who showed symptoms of fever, tested positive for H5N1 on 27 April. Three chickens were found to be infected with the virus as well.

                        The confirmation of a human case is alarming, because Djibouti imports chickens from abroad and has no poultry farms. "We are shortly going to ban the import of live poultry. I urge people to cook chicken well before eating it," Miguil said. "We will soon review our mechanisms of disease control. But I ask parents to watch their children and prevent them from playing with birds and from going near dead birds."

                        People in the capital have panicked since the announcement and stopped eating chicken. Said Ali, the owner of an open-air restaurant, regretted that the announcement was made in the early evening, when the food was already cooked. "If the minister had made his announcement in the morning, we could have made arrangements, but now it’s too late to throw it all away."

                        "Bird flu will be our only topic of conversation among friends," said Osman Ali, an 18-year-old student.

                        Confirmation of H5N1 in chickens puts Djibouti in phase III of the global pandemic, according to the WHO definition. Egypt is the only other country in Africa to have reported human infection of the disease.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

                          "Rumours of an outbreak of fever had been circulating in Djiboutiville since the beginning of April"

                          Ummm,

                          How big of an outbreak are we talking about here?

                          If the outbreak of fever is big enough to create rumors than we might have a worse situation than is being reported.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

                            I can see WHO coming to their help shortly so they can start a governmental bird flu monitoring and advisory comity that will help them in reporting more detailed news and advisories to the citizens. <o></o>

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

                              I just looked over Djibouti news online,

                              http://www.djibnet.com/news/story.php?id=9395

                              Radio TV <table border="0" cellpadding="2" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr valign="top"> <td></td> <td class="djboxbody">RTD Djibouti</td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td></td> <td class="djboxbody">RTD Djibouti (afar)</td> </tr> <tr valign="top"> <td></td> <td class="djboxbody">BBC Somali</td></tr></tbody> </table>
                              <table id="actualité afrique" summary="actualité" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="10" width="100%"> <tbody><tr><td class="gtitre_article" valign="bottom">Un premier cas humain de grippe aviaire H5N1 détecté</td></tr> <tr> <td class="info_article">DJIBOUTI - 11 mai 2006 - AFP</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="garticle" valign="top">Un premier cas humain de grippe aviaire H5N1 a été recensé à Djibouti, second pays africain, après l'Egypte, où le virus hautement pathogène a contaminé des êtres humains, a annoncé jeudi le ministre djiboutien de la Santé, Abdallah Abdillahi Miguil.
                              Djibouti est le premier pays d'Afrique de l'Est où le H5N1 est détecté et le huitième pays du continent touché par l'épizootie. En Egypte, cinq personnes sont décédées après avoir contracté la maladie.
                              Un prélèvement effectué le 27 avril chez une personne présentant des symptômes de la grippe a révélé un test positif au virus hautement pathogène H5N1, a déclaré le ministre de la Santé, dans un communiqué lu à la radio officielle djiboutienne.
                              Les tests ont été effectués en Egypte, en collaboration avec l'Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS), dans un laboratoire du Caire. M. Miguil n'a pas précisé l'identité du malade, ni son état de santé, ni l'établissement où il est soigné. Des tests se sont également avérés positifs sur trois poules, selon le communiqué de M. Miguil.
                              Face à l'apparition du virus, le ministère de la Santé "a pris toutes les dispositions nécessaires afin de mener une enquête plus approfondie du cas et de ses contacts, de renforcer la surveillance chez les humains et les volailles", a affirmé le ministre.
                              Les autorités sanitaires ont également décidé "la mise à disposition de médicaments et d’équipements de protection personnels pour le personnel de santé", selon la même source.



                              Le gouvernement a par ailleurs instauré "des mesures de contrôle et de prévention", selon le ministre de la Santé, qui n'a pas fourni de précision sur la nature de ces mesures.

                              Le gouvernement n'avait pas fait état jeudi en fin de journée de décision sur d'éventuelles campagnes d'abattages de volailles.
                              Par le biais de la radio nationale, le gouvernement de Djibouti a également appelé la population à prendre des mesures de précaution, en évitant le contact direct avec des oiseaux morts ou présentant des signes apparents de maladie.
                              Les autorités ont en outre demandé aux habitants de "signaler tout cas suspect aux autorités locales les plus proches".
                              Djibouti, petit pays francophone d'environ 700.000 habitants situé à l'entrée de la mer Rouge, abrite des bases militaires française et américaine, ainsi que des contingents de plusieurs armées occidentales stationnés dans le cadre des opérations de lutte antiterroriste déclenchée par les Etats-Unis après les attentats du 11 septembre 2001.
                              Depuis 2003, la grippe aviaire a tué 113 personnes dans le monde.
                              Les experts redoutent une mutation du H5N1 à la faveur d'une combinaison avec le virus de la grippe humaine. Une telle métamorphose pourrait donner naissance à un virus transmissible de l'homme à l'homme, au risque de provoquer une pandémie aussi redoutable que la grippe espagnole qui a tué des dizaines de millions de gens en 1918.
                              </td></tr></tbody> </table> http://www.jeuneafrique.com/jeune_af...26djibotcetdn0

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