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  • Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

    DJIBOUTI (AFP) - The tiny Red Sea state of Djibouti reported east Africa's first human case of the deadly H5N1 deadly bird flu strain and said some chickens were also infected.
    <SCRIPT type=text/javascript>if (window.yzq_a == null) document.write("<scr" + "ipt type=text/javascript src=""http://us.js2.yimg.com/us.js.yimg.com/lib/bc/bc_1.7.3.js></scr" + "ipt>");</SCRIPT><SCRIPT type=text/javascript>if (window.yzq_a){yzq_a('p', 'P=.KfD8ESOwhXB2l5HQ7xnsxNRpkY4yURjYTsABIzS&T=19k9 9aor4%2fX%3d1147363643%2fE%3d95959686%2fR%3dnews%2 fK%3d5%2fV%3d1.1%2fW%3d8%2fY%3dYAHOO%2fF%3d1834688 540%2fH%3dY2FjaGVoaW50PSJuZXdzIiBjb250ZW50PSJBZnJp Y2E7Zmx1O2hlYWx0aDt2aXJ1cztpdDtIZWFsdGg7cmVmdXJsX2 15X3lhaG9vX2NvbSIgcmVmdXJsPSJyZWZ1cmxfbXlfeWFob29f Y29tIiB0b3BpY3M9InJlZnVybF9teV95YWhvb19jb20i%2fS%3 d1%2fJ%3d40C28E44');yzq_a('a', '&U=1391mcfqk%2fN%3d4vO8U9G_Rvs-%2fC%3d431704.8275385.9169236.1414694%2fD%3dLREC%2 fB%3d3503658');}</SCRIPT><NOSCRIPT>http://us.bc.yahoo.com/b?P=.KfD8ESOw...%2fB%3d3503658</NOSCRIPT>
    The health ministry said that virology tests from samples of an infected person taken last month were positive for the virulent strain of the flu virus, which had also affected three domestic fowl.
    "Tests from a person suffering from flu-like symptoms on April 27 were positive for the disease," it said. "Three domestic hens were also affected by the virus."
    The ministry said the tests were carried out with the collaboration of the World Health Organisation at a laboratory in Cairo.
    Djibouti is the first country in east Africa to report the appearance of the H5N1 virus in either birds or humans and the eighth on the African continent to find the strain in birds.
    Egypt is the only other country in Africa where people have been infected by the disease, of whom five have died.


    http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20060511...lthfludjibouti

  • Sharpe
    replied
    Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

    More on the Djibouti case.
    http://www.dailypress.com/news/local...ws-local-final
    Portsmouth sailor fights bird flu
    sheinatz@dailypress.com 247-7821
    July 28, 2006
    For most of his 18 years in the Navy, Petty Officer 1st Class Linwood Pulley has trained and fought alongside Marines.

    He's a hospital corpsman. His job is to be there should a Marine get hurt.

    But since February, the 36-year-old Portsmouth native has been involved in what he calls, "work that's more about helping people and less about defense."

    Pulley is in Djibouti, on the Horn of Africa, where he is using his medical expertise teaching people how to detect and keep from being infected by the H5N1 strain of the bird flu, which humans are not immune to.

    In early April the first case of the virus, which has infected birds and people mostly in Asia, was found there.

    Several chickens in a backyard flock suddenly died.

    The Ministry of Agriculture was notified, and a four-person team, which included Pulley, was assembled to investigate.

    The U.S. Central Command - the Defense Department unit that oversees operations in Iraq and Afghanistan - also leads the Djibouti-based Combined Joint Task Force, Horn of Africa. Djibouti is sandwiched between Eritrea and Somalia and borders the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea.

    Long-term missions there include combating terrorism. In the short term, service members are also providing clean water to Djiboutians, improving roadways and working in medicine.

    When Pulley was sent out to check on those chickens, he was admittedly a bit scared. Since 2003, 133 people have died from their infections.

    "But the fear factor fades," Pulley said during a phone interview Thursday.

    He donned protective gear - masks, gloves and a white suit that he pulled over his uniform and boots.

    "We went in there and inspected and tested a few chickens in the yard," Pulley said.

    Three chickens tested positive.

    Then a little girl living a few miles away in a small village was found to be infected.

    Medical personnel still don't know how she caught the virus. She had no contact with the dead chickens as far as Pulley said they could tell.

    While a British company announced this week that, if approved, it could mass-produce a vaccine next year, finding this first case of the virus in Djibouti was cause for concern.

    "So we've been helping educate people," Pulley said.

    The military medical team, with the French military and the World Health Organization, is teaching people what the bird flu is.

    They're putting medical personnel on "what we call on-the-job-training. We show them how to detect the virus. We teach them the different safety measures we use to draw blood, to do throat swabs."

    No additional cases have been found since those first positive tests.

    "But there is still a lot of research to be done."

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  • DB
    replied
    Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

    "Tests have confirmed the two-year-old girl infected in a rural village in Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa has the H5N1 virus and three of her siblings are also suspected of having bird flu."

    This is also known as a cluster.

    "The WHO says the situation has been rendered even more complicated by an outbreak of dengue fever, which can mask the occurrence of other febrile illnesses with abrupt onset of symptoms."

    Actually the outbreak is most likely Chikungunya, which can also mask the occurrence of H5N1.

    "The WHO says that there is concern as many households in Djibouti keep small numbers of poultry, and the extent of infection in animals was poorly understood."

    Now this statement is highly suspect because previous reports about Djibouti say that "chicken is considered a luxury by most of the population and 90% of the poultry eaten in the country is imported frozen."

    Furthermore in this information found here http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6044 we can see that when Vets assisted by police in the village of Bahour, they slaughtered 26 chickens this week.

    Yes 26 chickens in the whole village. Staggering numbers aren't they?

    So clearly we have a conflict here. WHO is saying that many households in Djibouti keep small numbers of poultry, they use the word many, but that flies directly in the face of the information that has been reported. This is clearly evidenced by fact that chicken is a luxury, 90% of it is imported and the massive slaughter that occurred in Bahour, when 26 chickens were sent to their deaths contradict the claim that 'many households' keep chickens.

    Something is not adding up.

    So I ask, what is really going on in Djibouti?
    Last edited by DB; May 17th, 2006, 05:14 PM.

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  • DB
    replied
    Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

    http://www.news-medical.net/?id=18028

    Experts concerned over bird flu 'clusters' in Indonesia
    Disease/Infection News
    Published: Wednesday, 17-May-2006


    The World Health Organisation (WHO) has confirmed five bird flu deaths in Indonesia and says that the disease has now spread to the Horn of Africa.
    According to the WHO four of the Indonesian deaths were in members of one family in North Sumatra and one was in the country's second largest city, Surabaya, in East Java where a 38-year-old catering businesswoman who had dealt with live pigs and pork meat died last week.

    Earlier eight members of a single family in North Sumatra were infected and six of them have since died, conclusive test results on the sixth death are still pending.

    To date 30 of the 38 human cases of bird flu in Indonesia have proved fatal.

    Experts are now studying "cluster" cases of the disease for indications that the H5N1 virus may have mutated into a form easily passed between people which could trigger a global human pandemic.

    The virus has already infected poultry in 27 of Indonesia's 33 provinces, including Irian Jaya and the resort island of Bali.

    Critics have castigated the Indonesian government for being reluctant to carry out mass bird slaughters in infected areas.

    Tests have confirmed the two-year-old girl infected in a rural village in Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa has the H5N1 virus and three of her siblings are also suspected of having bird flu.

    According to the WHO Djibouti health authorities are attempting to track the spread of the infection following reports of a small number deaths in chicken deaths in early April but have been hampered by the country's limited resources.

    The WHO says the situation has been rendered even more complicated by an outbreak of dengue fever, which can mask the occurrence of other febrile illnesses with abrupt onset of symptoms.

    The WHO says that there is concern as many households in Djibouti keep small numbers of poultry, and the extent of infection in animals was poorly understood.

    The slaughtering of poultry was apparently halted when angry villagers refused to cooperate unless they received immediate compensation.
    Djibouti has appealed for international help to fight the disease.

    The addition of the latest cases takes the bird flu death toll to 120 out of the 213 people in 10 countries infected by the disease.

    Virtually all victims caught the disease from poultry.

    At present the virus remains a disease in birds and is difficult for humans to catch.

    Bird flu first emerged in the far east in 2003 but has spread to Africa and Europe in recent months.

    Although more than 200 millions birds have died, the disease has rarely spread to humans but experts fear the virus might mutate into a form which transfers between people.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bruce
    replied
    Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

    Djibouti

    Whats up, eny news?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mingus
    replied
    Re: Djibouti - the little girl who is infected

    Machine Translation
    of
    http://www.djibnet.com/news/story.php?id=9419


    The advertisement is brutal, alarming. In Damerjog, small village of the district of Arta, with 9 kilometers in the South-east of the capital, people are upset. In this peaceful hamlet where stockbreeders and market-gardeners c&#244;toient themselves, the news fell like a chopper. Villagers bound by small groups in the neighbourhoods of the center of care, do not have that that with the mouth.

    Everyone is afraid of this disease. The aviary influenza became a reality of the day at the following day. Them which were accustomed with anaemia, malnutrition or with the fever dengue do not manage to include/understand this new disease. For them, it is right a bad publicity for Damerjog, this village which started economically to rectify the head with the arrival of the Americans. However, the aviary influenza exists indeed and the first victim is called Choukri Abdi Ali.

    The young girl with the H5N1

    Last Saturday at the time of a report, we returned visit to this 2 years ordinary young girl. The vitreous glance, hauled dye, it seems at first sight &#233;reint&#233;e. In the buildings of the pharmacy of the Community center of care of Damerjog arranged on the occasion, the young girl is lengthened on a summary bed under perfusion. According to the doctors, it seems drawn from business with the TAMIFLU. This anti-flu supposed effective being counters the aviary influenza was managed to him. "But of the rises of intermittent fevers persist", Declare Kamil Issa, the male nurse of guard.

    At side of it, his/her brothers and s?urs like his mother with her last-born child under the arm. The nurse major posts some with the CSC of Damerjog affirmed us that the other children of the family developed the same symptoms as them s?ur.

    For this reason, according to the person in charge, for pushed analyses, samples of blood of these children were sent to the laboratory of Namru III of Cairo, that one even which diagnosed the H5N1 at Choukri.

    With our arrival, the young girl incr&#233;dule, panicked by the cracklings of the flashes bursts in sobs. His/her mother, more by despair that by maternal reflex, try to reassure it after a fashion. This housewife has evil to believe that his/her daughter hospitalized for last Thursday has suffered from this strange disease. As a misfortune never arrives only, it is afraid for her three other children, confined to bed at Choukri.

    Poultries of a low court at the origin of the contamination

    As there is not poultry breeding in Djibouti, it is normal that the population expresses doubts on the sudden appearance of this disease. According to any probability, small Choukri Abdi Ali was contaminated by hens of its farmyard (eleven).

    Poultries which them c&#244;toient water birds resulting from the important zone of conservation of birds of the coast which borders the village of Damerjog.

    This zone which would be located on an important air lane of the migratory birds represents from now on a permanent danger to the residents. Moreover, it is for that that the persons in charge for the ministry for the Breeding who listed some 3000 hen heads in the country will undertake poultry a massive demolition campaign very soon. It will be necessary in addition, according to them, to put a term at the importation of the poultries, especially of those coming from the countries bordering.

    For this reason, the importers always despized prohibitions, and always continue to sell their poultries with seen and with known authorities concerned. Time had just acted quickly. And to prevail against those which refuse to cooperate.
    Last edited by Mellie; May 15th, 2006, 12:48 PM.

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  • Mingus
    replied
    Re: Djibouti - the little girl who is infected

    This really seem to be the real baby,

    Here is from a francophone site.

    http://www.djibnet.com/news/story.php?id=9419

    Choukri, le premier cas humain de grippe aviaire
    La Nation - 15/05/2006


    L'annonce est brutale, effrayante. A Damerjog, petite bourgade du district d'Arta, &#224; 9 kilom&#232;tres au Sud-est de la capitale, les gens sont boulevers&#233;s. Dans ce hameau paisible o&#249; se c&#244;toient &#233;leveurs et mara&#238;chers, la nouvelle est tomb&#233;e comme un couperet. Les villageois agglutin&#233;s par petits groupes aux alentours du centre de soins, n'ont que &#231;a &#224; la bouche.
    Tout le monde a peur de cette maladie. La grippe aviaire est devenue une r&#233;alit&#233; du jour au lendemain. Eux qui &#233;taient accoutum&#233;s &#224; l'an&#233;mie, la malnutrition ou &#224; la fi&#232;vre dengue n'arrivent pas &#224; comprendre cette nouvelle maladie. Pour eux, c'est juste une mauvaise publicit&#233; pour Damerjog, cette bourgade qui commen&#231;ait &#224; redresser la t&#234;te &#233;conomiquement avec l'arriv&#233;e des Am&#233;ricains. Pourtant, la grippe aviaire existe bel et bien et la premi&#232;re victime s'appelle Choukri Abdi Ali.

    La fillette au H5N1
    Samedi dernier lors d'un reportage, nous avons rendu visite &#224; cette fillette ordinaire de 2 ans. Le regard vitreux, le teint hal&#233;, elle semble &#224; premi&#232;re vue &#233;reint&#233;e. Dans les locaux de la pharmacie du centre de soins communautaire de Damerjog am&#233;nag&#233; &#224; l'occasion, la fillette est allong&#233;e sur un lit sommaire sous perfusion. Selon les m&#233;decins, elle semble tir&#233;e d'affaire avec le TAMIFLU. Cet anti-grippal cens&#233; &#234;tre efficace contre la grippe aviaire lui a &#233;t&#233; administr&#233;e. "Mais des mont&#233;es de fi&#232;vres intermittentes persistent ", d&#233;clare Kamil Issa, l'infirmier de garde.

    A c&#244;t&#233; d'elle, ses fr&#232;res et sœurs ainsi que sa m&#232;re avec son dernier-n&#233; sous le bras. L'infirmi&#232;re major en poste au CSC de Damerjog nous a affirm&#233; que les autres enfants de la famille ont d&#233;velopp&#233; les m&#234;mes sympt&#244;mes que leur sœur.

    A ce titre, selon la responsable, pour des analyses pouss&#233;es, des &#233;chantillons de sang de ces enfants ont &#233;t&#233; envoy&#233;s au laboratoire de Namru III du Caire, celui- l&#224; m&#234;me qui a diagnostiqu&#233; le H5N1 chez Choukri.

    A notre arriv&#233;e, la fillette incr&#233;dule, paniqu&#233;e par les cr&#233;pitements des flashs &#233;clate en sanglots. Sa m&#232;re, plus par d&#233;sespoir que par r&#233;flexe maternel, essaie de la rassurer tant bien que mal. Cette femme au foyer a du mal &#224; croire que sa fille hospitalis&#233;e depuis jeudi dernier souffre de cette &#233;trange maladie. Comme un malheur n'arrive jamais seul, elle a peur pour ses trois autres enfants, alit&#233;s aupr&#232;s de Choukri.
    Des volailles d'une basse cour &#224; l'origine de la contamination
    Comme il n'existe pas d'&#233;levage de volailles &#224; Djibouti, il est normal que la population &#233;mette des doutes sur l'apparition soudaine de cette maladie. Selon toute vraisemblance, la petite Choukri Abdi Ali a &#233;t&#233; contamin&#233;e par les poules de sa basse-cour (onze).
    Des volailles qui eux c&#244;toient des oiseaux d'eaux issus de l'importante zone de conservation d'oiseaux de la c&#244;te qui borde le village de Damerjog.
    Cette zone qui serait situ&#233;e sur un important couloir a&#233;rien des oiseaux migrateurs repr&#233;sente d&#233;sormais un danger permanent pour les riverains. D'ailleurs, c'est pour cela que les responsables du minist&#232;re de l'Elevage qui ont recens&#233; quelques 3000 t&#234;tes de poules dans le pays entreprendront une campagne massive d'abattage de volailles tr&#232;s prochainement. Il faudra par ailleurs, selon eux, mettre un terme &#224; l'importation des volailles, surtout de ceux provenant des pays limitrophes.
    A ce titre, les importateurs ont toujours fait fi des interdictions, et continuent toujours &#224; vendre leurs volailles au vus et au su des autorit&#233;s concern&#233;es. Le temps est venu d'agir vite. Et de s&#233;vir contre ceux qui refusent de coop&#233;rer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Theresa42
    replied
    Djibouti - the little girl who is infected

    Choukri, first human bird flu case in sub-Saharan Africa
    http://english.alarabonline.org/disp...55:26%20%C3%95

    Name:  b5b989ee095395193580ed821fb9101f.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  14.2 KB

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  • AlaskaDenise
    replied
    Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

    The village of Arta, the baby's home, is actually at the end of the Great Rift Valley. See map below and visualize birds traveling from that valley overland via lakes to Arta, then the Gulf of Aden.

    .
    Last edited by AlaskaDenise; July 27th, 2007, 05:22 PM.

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  • Snowy Owl
    replied
    Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

    Some news from a forum in Djibouti

    Parait que c'est un cauchemar a djibouti car y'a une epidemie de dengue qui subit en plus donc plein de gens sont malades de la dengue et en plus y'a des cas de grippe aviaire, un bebe de 2 ans a ete touche.
    Le bebe est originaire d'un village pres de Arta.

    It seems it is a nightmare in Djibouti because there is an epidemic of dengue, so many people are sick of dengue and now there are avian flu cases, a baby of 2 yrs old got it. The baby comes from a village near Arta.

    N.B.
    This is the first contact I have with this person, so I do not know how credible this is.

    Leave a comment:


  • Theresa42
    replied
    Other three children gave positive [sic] to bird influenza in Djiboutí

    babelfished from Spanish:

    Other three children gave positive [sic] to bird influenza in Djiboutí

    Friday, 12 May 2006

    The World-wide Organization of the Health said that three children in Djiboutí are being analyzed by possible infection with bird influenza, a day after the organization confirmed the first human case of H5N1 in that nation of the African east.

    Civil employees of health said this Friday that the three children who are under observation are brothers of small of two years of age infected. A spokeswoman of the WHO indicated that the girl is in stable situation.

    Thursday, the minister of Health of Djiboutí said that at least three chickens property of the family gave positive to an analysis of bird influenza. The WHO has confirmed 208 human cases of bird influenza in 10 countries.

    http://www.voanews.com/spanish/2006-05-12-voa34.cfm

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  • Theresa42
    replied
    Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

    babelfish of above article:

    Young girl reached of the H5N1 in Djibouti: information taking away and campaign
    May 12, 2006

    DJIBOUTI (AFP) - The authorities of Djibouti launched an information campaign of the population on the aviary influenza and carried out new taking away on chickens after the advertisement Thursday that a two year old young girl was reached virus highly pathogenic H5N1.

    Djibouti is the second African country, after Egypt, where the highly pathogenic virus contaminated human beings. In Egypt, five people died after having contracted the disease.

    In Geneva, the World Organization of Health (WHO) announced that three suspect cases of aviary influenza were counted at people in Djibouti in more of the confirmed case of the two year old young girl. At the time of a point of press, the spokesman of WHO, Fadéla Chaïb, specified that small the two year old girl was currently under medical supervision in Djibouti. "It is in a stable state but the symptoms persist", it declared.

    Three people of its entourage are also in observation and of the taking away were sent to a laboratory of Cairo to determine if these close relations are also reached by the H5N1, declared the spokesman.

    WHO considers team sending of three people including/understanding a epidemiologist, an expert of the fight against the infections and a specialist in the medical communication near the threatened populations, specified Mrs. Chaïb.

    The Djibouti ministry of Agriculture ordered "new taking away on chickens" Thursday to make them analyze, declared Friday with AFP representing it local WHO, Jihane Tawilah.

    In parallel, the government launched through the audio-visual media an information campaign of the population to the disease, and the measures of prevention to be respected.

    Thursday, the Djibouti Minister for Health, Abdallah Abdillahi Miguil, had announced that a taking away carried out on 27 April at a person presenting of the symptoms of the influenza had revealed a positive test with the H5N1.

    Tests carried out on three chickens - a death, two alive which was then cut down - also proved to be positive.

    Djibouti, small French-speaking country of 23.000 km2 and approximately 700.000 inhabitants located at the entry of the Red Sea, is the first country of East Africa where the H5N1 is detected and eighth country of the continent touched by epizooty.

    "We did not expect that Djibouti is the first country touched" in East Africa, commented on representing it of WHO, depending that "il has very little poultry consumption there" in the country and that "the density of hens" is very low taking into consideration other State of the area.

    The chicken consumption is indeed traditionally low in Djibouti, country of wandering stockbreeders, explained under cover of anonymity a Djibouti person in charge.

    Moreover, "the chicken is a product of luxury. It costs twice expensive than the meat of sheep", it added. Approximately 90% of the poultry consumed in the country are imported frozen.

    "Djibouti is a populated coastal country of nomads where one consumes especially sheepmeat and fish", according to the same source.

    Since 2003, the aviary influenza killed 113 people in the world.

    The experts fear a change of the H5N1 to the favour of a combination with the human flu virus.

    Such a metamorphosis could give rise to a transmissible virus of the man to the man, with the risk to cause a pandemia as frightening as the Spanish influenza which killed out of tens of million people in 1918.

    http://www.avmaroc.com/actualite/fil...te-a26205.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Snowy Owl
    replied
    Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

    <table cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><th colspan="2" style="padding: 0pt 0pt 6px;">Fillette atteinte du H5N1 &#224; Djibouti: pr&#233;l&#232;vements et campagne d'information</th> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="padding: 0pt 0pt 3px; text-align: justify;"> <table style="border: 1px solid rgb(179, 114, 20); margin: 3px;" align="left" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0"> <tbody><tr> <td>', 'photo0', 384, 264, '', '', 'D&#233;sinfection dans un zoo &#233;gyptien en pr&#233;vention de la grippe aviaire, le 16 mars 2006 (&#169; AFP/Archives - Khaled Desouki)')</td> </tr> </tbody></table>DJIBOUTI (AFP) - Les autorit&#233;s de Djibouti ont lanc&#233;
    une campagne d'information de la population sur la grippe aviaire et proc&#233;d&#233; &#224; de nouveaux pr&#233;l&#232;vements sur des poulets apr&#232;s l'annonce jeudi qu'une fillette de deux ans &#233;tait atteinte du virus hautement pathog&#232;ne H5N1.
    </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: justify;">Djibouti est le deuxi&#232;me pays africain, apr&#232;s l'Egypte, o&#249; le virus hautement pathog&#232;ne a contamin&#233; des &#234;tres humains. En Egypte, cinq personnes sont d&#233;c&#233;d&#233;es apr&#232;s avoir contract&#233; la maladie.

    A Gen&#232;ve, l'Organisation mondiale de la sant&#233; (OMS) a annonc&#233; que trois cas suspects de grippe aviaire ont &#233;t&#233; d&#233;nombr&#233;s chez des personnes &#224; Djibouti en plus du cas confirm&#233; de la fillette de deux ans.

    Lors d'un point de presse, la porte-parole de l'OMS, Fad&#233;la Cha&#239;b, a pr&#233;cis&#233; que la petite fille de deux ans &#233;tait actuellement sous surveillance m&#233;dicale &#224; Djibouti. "Elle est dans un &#233;tat stable mais les sympt&#244;mes persistent", a-t-elle d&#233;clar&#233;.

    Trois personnes de son entourage sont aussi en observation et des pr&#233;l&#232;vements ont &#233;t&#233; envoy&#233;s &#224; un laboratoire du Caire pour d&#233;terminer si ces proches sont &#233;galement atteints par le H5N1, a d&#233;clar&#233; la porte-parole.

    L'OMS envisage l'envoi d'une &#233;quipe de trois personnes comprenant un &#233;pid&#233;miologiste, un expert de la lutte contre les infections et un sp&#233;cialiste de la communication sanitaire aupr&#232;s des populations menac&#233;es, a pr&#233;cis&#233; Mme Cha&#239;b.

    Le minist&#232;re djiboutien de l'Agriculture a ordonn&#233; "de nouveaux pr&#233;l&#232;vements sur des poulets" jeudi pour les faire analyser, a d&#233;clar&#233; vendredi &#224; l'AFP la repr&#233;sentante locale de l'OMS, Jihane Tawilah.

    Parall&#232;lement, le gouvernement a lanc&#233; &#224; travers les m&#233;dias audiovisuels une campagne d'information de la population sur la maladie, et les mesures de pr&#233;vention &#224; respecter.

    <table style="border: 1px solid rgb(179, 114, 20); margin: 5px; width: 87px; height: 117px;" align="right" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="0"> <tbody><tr> <td align="center">'
    </td> </tr> </tbody></table>

    Jeudi, le ministre djiboutien de la Sant&#233;, Abdallah Abdillahi Miguil, avait annonc&#233; qu'un pr&#233;l&#232;vement effectu&#233; le 27 avril chez une personne pr&#233;sentant des sympt&#244;mes de la grippe avait r&#233;v&#233;l&#233; un test positif au H5N1.

    Des tests men&#233;s sur trois poulets - un mort, deux vivants qui ont ensuite &#233;t&#233; abattus - se sont &#233;galement av&#233;r&#233;s positifs.

    Djibouti, petit pays francophone de 23.000 km2 et d'environ 700.000 habitants situ&#233;e &#224; l'entr&#233;e de la mer Rouge, est le premier pays d'Afrique de l'Est o&#249; le H5N1 est d&#233;tect&#233; et le huiti&#232;me pays du continent touch&#233; par l'&#233;pizootie.

    "Nous ne nous attendions pas &#224; ce que Djibouti soit le premier pays touch&#233;" en Afrique de l'Est, a comment&#233; la repr&#233;sentante de l'OMS, relevant qu'"il y a tr&#232;s peu de consommation de volailles" dans le pays et que "la densit&#233; de poules" est tr&#232;s faible au regard d'autres Etats de la r&#233;gion.

    La consommation de poulet est en effet traditionnellement faible &#224; Djibouti, pays d'&#233;leveurs nomades, a expliqu&#233; sous couvert d'anonymat un responsable djiboutien.

    En outre, "le poulet est un produit de luxe. Il co&#251;te deux fois plus cher que la viande de mouton", a-t-il ajout&#233;. Environ 90% de la volaille consomm&#233;e dans le pays est import&#233;e congel&#233;e.

    "Djibouti est un pays c&#244;tier peupl&#233; de nomades o&#249; l'on consomme surtout de la viande ovine et du poisson", selon la m&#234;me source.

    Depuis 2003, la grippe aviaire a tu&#233; 113 personnes dans le monde.

    Les experts redoutent une mutation du H5N1 &#224; la faveur d'une combinaison avec le virus de la grippe humaine.

    Une telle m&#233;tamorphose pourrait donner naissance &#224; un virus transmissible de l'homme &#224; l'homme, au risque de provoquer une pand&#233;mie aussi redoutable que la grippe espagnole qui a tu&#233; des dizaines de millions de personnes en 1918.

    </td> </tr> <tr> <td height="21" valign="bottom">http://www.avmaroc.com/actualite/fil...te-a26205.html
    </td></tr></tbody></table>

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  • DB
    replied
    Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

    Once again it should be mentioned that,

    "Chicken is considered a luxury by most of the population. About 90 % of the poultry eaten in the country is imported frozen."

    Therefore the information about the girls family having chickens should be considered highly questionable at this time considering they are poor rural family.

    "All three are believed to have been in close contact with a two-year-old girl, who began to show symptoms of the disease in late April and has tested positive for the deadly H5N1 virus. "

    Furthermore the three other suspect cases had close contact with the two year old and there is no mention of close contact with dead or sick birds of any sort.

    "Thompson says a concerted effort is under way in Djibouti to try to contain the spread of the disease. He says his organization has sent supplies of Tamiflu antiviral medication, which has proven to be effective against the disease. Protective equipment for doctors and nurses has also been delivered to hospitals."

    The fact that they are sending in Tamiflu and PPE's for the doctors and nurses should also raise red flags as the situation in Djibouti seems to represent some form of human to human transmission.

    Whether or not the transmission is sustained or efficient is unknown but from the information we are getting at this point there is definetly "cause for concern" (Stolen from Niman).

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  • DB
    replied
    Re: Djibouti reports first human case of deadly bird flu in east Africa

    <TABLE style="DIRECTION: ltr" width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>http://www.voanews.com/english/2006-05-12-voa50.cfm
    Djibouti Officials Fear Bird-Flu Outbreak Near Somali Border
    </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top>By Alisha Ryu
    Nairobi
    12 May 2006
    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


    International health and agricultural officials in Djibouti are analyzing blood samples from poultry and people in the area near the Somali border, where a child has tested positive for the first case of the deadly bird flu virus to appear in East Africa.

    The United Nation's World Health Organization says three other people in a poor, rural village in Djibouti are under observation for possible infection.

    All three are believed to have been in close contact with a two-year-old girl, who began to show symptoms of the disease in late April and has tested positive for the deadly H5N1 virus.

    The unidentified girl is said to be receiving medical attention and in stable condition.

    In remarks broadcast Thursday on state television, Djibouti's health minister said that the girl's family kept chickens and at least three of the birds have also tested positive.

    The news of the first outbreak of the bird flu virus in East Africa has renewed fears that wild migratory birds may be playing a role in spreading the virus to domesticated fowl.

    In Africa, bird flu has been reported in Nigeria, Cameroon, Niger, Egypt, and now Djibouti. None of these countries are major migratory bird stopover sites and the World Health Organization's team leader for pandemic and outbreak communication, Dick Thompson, says there is still no conclusive evidence that wild birds are carrying the virus to the continent.

    "We believe that some of the virus spread has been through migratory birds but we do not really have a firm grip on that," he said. "It is possible that just simply the commercial movement of birds may have played a role. We just do not know."

    Thompson says a concerted effort is under way in Djibouti to try to contain the spread of the disease. He says his organization has sent supplies of Tamiflu antiviral medication, which has proven to be effective against the disease. Protective equipment for doctors and nurses has also been delivered to hospitals.

    Although H5N1 can cause death in people, transmission from poultry to humans has so far proven to be difficult, usually involving prolonged and intimate contact with infected animals.

    The fear is, though, the virus might evolve into a form that can be easily transmitted and provoke a global pandemic.

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