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  • Vaccine. A probiotic fermented dairy drink improves antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly in two randomised controlled trials.

    Vaccine. 2009 Jul 15. [Epub ahead of print]

    A probiotic fermented dairy drink improves antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly in two randomised controlled trials.

    Boge T, R?migy M, Vaudaine S, Tanguy J, Bourdet-Sicard R, van der Werf S. - Maison de Retraite Sainte Famille, Avenue Louis Jourdan, 01270 Bourg en Bresse, France.


    BACKGROUND:
    Influenza vaccination is recommended for the elderly in many countries, but immune responses are weaker compared to younger adults.

    OBJECTIVE:
    To investigate the impact of daily consumption of a probiotic dairy drink on the immune response to influenza vaccination in an elderly population of healthy volunteers over 70 years of age.

    DESIGN:
    Two randomised, multicentre, double-blind, controlled studies were conducted during two vaccination seasons in 2005-2006 (pilot) and 2006-2007 (confirmatory). Eighty-six and 222 elderly volunteers consumed a fermented dairy drink, containing the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 and yoghurt ferments (Actimel((R))), or a non-fermented control dairy product twice daily for a period of 7 weeks (pilot) or 13 weeks (confirmatory). Vaccination occurred after 4 weeks of product consumption. Geometric mean antibody titres (GMT) against the three viral strains composing the vaccine (H1N1, H3N2, and B) were measured at several time intervals post-vaccination by haemagglutination inhibition test.

    RESULTS:
    In the pilot study, the influenza-specific antibody titres increased after vaccination, being consistently higher in the probiotic product group compared to the control group under product consumption. Similarly, in the confirmatory study, titres against the B strain increased significantly more in the probiotic group than in the control group at 3, 6 and 9 weeks post-vaccination under product consumption (p=0.020). Significant differences in seroconversion between the groups by intended to treat analysis were still found 5 months after vaccination. Similar GMT results were observed for the H3N2 strain and H1N1, confirming the results of the pilot study.

    CONCLUSION:
    These studies demonstrate that daily consumption of this particular probiotic product increased relevant specific antibody responses to influenza vaccination in individuals of over 70 years of age and may therefore provide a health benefit in this population.

    PMID: 19615959 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
    PMID: 19609249 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
    -
    ------

  • #2
    Re: Vaccine. A probiotic fermented dairy drink improves antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly in two randomised controlled trials.

    Which probiotic did they use???? Lactoferrin? Some kind of yogurt drink? Can someone find out please.
    Please do not ask me for medical advice, I am not a medical doctor.

    Avatar is a painting by Alan Pollack, titled, "Plague". I'm sure it was an accident that the plague girl happened to look almost like my twin.
    Thank you,
    Shannon Bennett

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Vaccine. A probiotic fermented dairy drink improves antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly in two randomised controlled trials.

      increased how much ? 1% ? 1000% ?
      I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
      my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Vaccine. A probiotic fermented dairy drink improves antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly in two randomised controlled trials.

        A probiotic fermented dairy drink improves antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly in two randomised controlled trials


        References and further reading may be available for this article. To view references and further reading you must purchase this article.


        Thierry Bogea, , , Michel Rémigyb, Sarah Vaudainec, Jérôme Tanguyc, Raphaëlle Bourdet-Sicardc and Sylvie van der Werfd

        aMaison de Retraite Sainte Famille, Avenue Louis Jourdan, 01270 Bourg en Bresse, France

        bMaison de Retraite Sainte Famille, 2 Rue Couvents, 57950 Montigny Les Metz, France

        cDanone Research, Route Départementale 128, 91767 Palaiseau Cedex, France

        dUnit of Molecular Genetics of RNA Viruses, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 Rue du Dr Roux, 75724 Paris Cedex 15, France


        Received 12 March 2009; revised 12 June 2009; accepted 29 June 2009. Available online 16 July 2009.

        Abstract
        Background
        Influenza vaccination is recommended for the elderly in many countries, but immune responses are weaker compared to younger adults.

        Objective
        To investigate the impact of daily consumption of a probiotic dairy drink on the immune response to influenza vaccination in an elderly population of healthy volunteers over 70 years of age.

        Design
        Two randomised, multicentre, double-blind, controlled studies were conducted during two vaccination seasons in 2005–2006 (pilot) and 2006–2007 (confirmatory). Eighty-six and 222 elderly volunteers consumed a fermented dairy drink, containing the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 and yoghurt ferments (Actimel&#174, or a non-fermented control dairy product twice daily for a period of 7 weeks (pilot) or 13 weeks (confirmatory). Vaccination occurred after 4 weeks of product consumption. Geometric mean antibody titres (GMT) against the three viral strains composing the vaccine (H1N1, H3N2, and B) were measured at several time intervals post-vaccination by haemagglutination inhibition test.

        Results
        In the pilot study, the influenza-specific antibody titres increased after vaccination, being consistently higher in the probiotic product group compared to the control group under product consumption. Similarly, in the confirmatory study, titres against the B strain increased significantly more in the probiotic group than in the control group at 3, 6 and 9 weeks post-vaccination under product consumption (p = 0.020). Significant differences in seroconversion between the groups by intended to treat analysis were still found 5 months after vaccination. Similar GMT results were observed for the H3N2 strain and H1N1, confirming the results of the pilot study.

        Conclusion
        These studies demonstrate that daily consumption of this particular probiotic product increased relevant specific antibody responses to influenza vaccination in individuals of over 70 years of age and may therefore provide a health benefit in this population.

        Keywords: Influenza; Vaccination; Probiotic; Actimel; Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001

        Article Outline
        1. Introduction
        2. Subjects and methods
        2.1. Overall organization of clinical studies
        2.2. Subjects included in the studies
        2.3. Study products
        2.4. Design of the studies
        2.5. Influenza vaccine
        2.6. Antibody titres assays
        2.7. Adverse events
        2.8. Data analyses
        2.9. Statistics
        3. Results
        3.1. Pilot study: positive tendencies on antibody responses for the probiotic product group
        3.2. Confirmatory study: increased antibody responses in the probiotic product group
        3.3. Geometric mean antibody titres
        3.4. Seroprotection
        3.5. Seroconversion
        3.6. Adverse events
        4. Discussion
        Acknowledgements
        References




        Fig. 1. Design of the pilot and the confirmatory studies. An initial screening visit was conducted 1–4 weeks prior to enrolment and randomisation (Visit 1). At randomisation (Visit 2) volunteers received their first intake of Actimel® or control product. Vaccination occurred 4 weeks after randomisation (Visit 3). Black boxes represent when blood samples were collected. (A) Design of the pilot study (2005–2006). Study products consumption lasted 7 weeks from Visits 2 to 4. Alimentary restriction on fermented dairy products was applied from Visits 1 to 4. Follow-up (Visits 4 and 5) and end of the study (Visit 6) visits were performed 3 weeks, 3 months and 5 months post-vaccination, respectively. (B) Design of the confirmatory study (2006–2007). Study products consumption lasted 13 weeks from Visits 2 to 4. Alimentary restriction on fermented dairy products was applied from Visits 1 to 6. Follow-up (Visits 4–6) and end of the study (Visit 7) visits were performed 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 9 weeks and 5 months post-vaccination, respectively.


        Fig. 2. Pilot study—antibody responses of intention-to-treat population at 3 weeks after vaccination. Antibody titres against A/New Caledonia/20/99(H1N1), A/California/7/2004(H3N2) and B/Jiangsu/10/2004 were determined by HI test 3 weeks after vaccination. Geometric mean titres (GMT) ± GSEM (geometric standard error at the mean) (panel A), seroprotection rates (panel B) and seroconversion rates (panel C) are represented for the probiotic product (open bars) and for control product (filled bars) groups. Results were statistically not significant.

        View Within Article

        Fig. 3. Confirmatory study—antibody titres of intention-to-treat population at 3 weeks, 6 weeks and 9 weeks after vaccination. Antibody titres against A/New Caledonia/20/99(H1N1) (panel A), A/Wisconsin/67/2005(H3N2) (panel B) and B/Malaysia/2506/2004 (panel C) were determined by HI test at baseline, 3 weeks (3w), 6 weeks (6w) or 9 weeks (9w) after vaccination. Geometric mean titres (GMT) &#177; GSEM (geometric standard error at the mean) are represented for the probiotic product group (n = 113; filled squares) and for the control product group (n = 109; open triangles). Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05; repeated-measures analysis) are indicated by an asterisk.
        View Within Article


        Fig. 4. Confirmatory study—seroconversion rates of intention-to-treat population. Antibody titres against A/New Caledonia/20/99(H1N1), A/Wisconsin/67/2005(H3N2) and B/Malaysia/2506/2004 were determined by HI test prior to vaccination and 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 9 weeks and 5 months after vaccination. Seroconversion rates are represented. (A) Kinetics of seroconversion against the type B over clinical study time. Statistically significant differences are indicated as absolute values, overall p value during product consumption period was 0.002. (B) Seroconversion towards the 3 vaccine strains at 5 months after vaccination.

        View Within Article

        Table 1.
        WHO recommendations for influenza vaccine composition for the Northern hemisphere (2004–2007).



        The pilot study was conducted during the 2005–2006 vaccination season.

        The confirmatory study was conducted during the 2006–2007 vaccination season.

        a Antigenically equivalent strains.

        Table 2.
        Baseline characteristics in the ITT population–pilot and confirmatory studies.



        BMI: body mass index height/(weight).

        AGGIR score: cf. Section 2 for subjects included in the study.

        a The tests used for statistical comparison are indicated into parentheses. W: Wilcoxon test; T: t-test; C: Chi-square test; F: Fisher exact test.

        View Within Article

        The study was sponsored in part by Danone Research, France. After design of the study all research was conducted independently without influence from the sponsor.

        http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...971ab1fc003e51

        Getting more deatils costs $31.50US.

        .
        Last edited by AlaskaDenise; July 25, 2009, 04:15 PM. Reason: formatting
        "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Vaccine. A probiotic fermented dairy drink improves antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly in two randomised controlled trials.

          First launched in Retardia in 1994, Actimel (also known as DanActive in the United States and Canada) is a 'probiotic' yoghurt-type drink produced by the French company Danone. It is sold in 100ml bottles, typically as an 8, 6 or 4 pack, but more recently as a 12 or 16 pack. The main claimed benefit of Actimel is the strengthening of the body's natural defences through the use of patented bacterial culture called Lactobacillus casei DN-114001, marketed as Lactobacillus casei Defensis or Immunitas(s). Each bottle is claimed to contain 10 billion of these bacteria.[1] In addition Actimel has the traditional yoghurt cultures Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus.

          After the introduction of Yakult in Europe in 1993 several other companies including Danone responded releasing their own L. casei based products. Since 1994, L. casei based yogurts have become a common part of West European diets.

          Actimel earned over €1400 million (US$1.8 billion) in retail sales in 2006 [2] and can be found in more than 20 European countries as well as in South America and the Middle East. Actimel was released as DanActive in the United States on a limited regional basis in 2004 (flavours Strawberry, Vanilla, and Blueberry) then was given a nationwide launch in 2007 (adding the flavour Cranberry/Raspberry).

          Contents [hide]
          1 Ingredients
          2 Scientific basis
          3 Debates surrounding health claims on probiotic foods
          4 Nutrition facts
          5 References
          6 External links


          [edit] Ingredients
          Standard Actimel (excludes variations such as Actimel Light)

          Contains:
          Milk (fresh/powder)
          Sugar (sucrose)
          Live Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 probiotic strain, 10 000 million per 100 mL bottle[1]
          Live yoghurt cultures


          [edit] Scientific basis
          The main claimed benefit on body's defences is supported by several scientific studies as reported by the manufacturer various websites[3], although the list of scientific papers appears to be not homogeneous depending on each country's website.[4][5][6]

          Claimed benefits could range from diarrhea[7][8][9] and allergy (rhinitis[10]) reduction for young children, improvement of the immune function in adults[11]) and seniors[12][13] and reduction of duration of winter infections for elderly.[14]

          Some clinical studies, unmentioned by the manufacturer website, suggest potential effects in hospitalized environment, like eradication of H. pylori along with antibiotics treatment for children[15] or restoration of activity of fecal enzymes in children after surgery.[16]

          A recent study published by the British Medical Journal[17] suggests that the product could help to avoid antibiotic associated diarrhea and to limit Clostridium difficile infections in elderly patients, information that received some media coverage in the UK.[18] In 2008 some British hospitals decided to use the product as part of the patient’s diet to fight the dangerous spread of C. difficile superbug.[19]

          More research is going on to determine the effectiveness, or otherwise, of this product in reducing the occurrence of more common illnesses in children attending daycare centers in the US. [20] This trial is listed by the US government website www.clinicaltrials.gov[21] where clinical trials have to be registered prior to their start, in a move to increase overall credibility when studies are financially sponsored by the drug (or food) manufacturer as in this case (proponents of a registry argue that the results of clinical trials with negative results are often not published by the sponsor of the study). The details recorded there state that this study was completed in June 2007 but according to its listing the findings have not yet been published.


          [edit] Debates surrounding health claims on probiotic foods
          On January 23 2008, a proposed class action was filed in California, accusing Danone Co. Inc. of false advertising in their marketing of yogurt containing probiotic bacteria (Danactive & Activia), alleging that the claimed health benefits have never been proven [22]. The company has denied this accusation. [23]

          Foodwatch claims that Danone "makes a mountain out of a molehill" in suggesting that Actimel protects from cold and boosts health. Foodwatch believes that the company sells a common product using excessive advertising.[24]

          The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) is an independent regulator for advertisements, sales promotion and direct marketing in the UK. According to Spiegel Online one TV spot from Actimel was blocked by the ASA in 2006 and one in 2008. [25] In the first case the "Meri on,meri j&#228;&#228;b,meri olema peab! Laine laksudes rannale l&#246;&#246;b!" ASA upheld a complaint that the advert misleadingly implied that children given Actimel would be prevented from catching bacterial infections.[26] Meanwhile in the second case complaints about the use of the phrase "Actimel is scientifically proven and you can see that proof for yourself on our website" were upheld as only summaries of, or references to, these studies were present on the website and the full content was not available[27].

          Alexa Meyer, from the Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Austria, comparing probiotic drinks and normal yoghurt, found no significant difference in the effect of Actimel and normal yogurt with living bacteria. The nutritional researcher recommends to get enough sleep, wash hands often and eat a daily bowl of yoghurt. She says this would activate more active germ-fighting white blood cells, enhancing the immune system, probably due to the presence of Lactobacillus bulgarius, from any normal yogurt, which has half the price of Actimel.[28]

          This is supported by Bethold Koletzko from the University of Munich, Metabolic Diseases and Nutrition, Munich, Germany in case of diarrhoea advises parents to give their children yogurt with living bacteria. It does not necessarily need to be Actimel, but may also be other yogurts. A measurable health benefit linked to the presence of live Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii sp. Bulgaricus was reported by Koletzko and colleagues 2005 yoghurt. In this review Koletzko and colleagues say that it was clearly demonstrated that yoghurt containing viable bacteria improves lactose digestion and eliminates symptoms of lactose intolerance, and clearly fulfil the current concept of probiotics. [29]

          Within the 27 countries of the European Union, a new health claims regulation was put in place by the European Commission as of July 1 2007 [30], under which companies who wish to make claims about the nutritional & functional benefits of a product must support the claims with scientific evidence.[31]

          In Canada, a similar regulation is currently in the works at Health Canada,[32], as it plans to update its assessment framework to make the system clearer and the claims more credible.[33]

          See also Health claims on food labels.


          [edit] Nutrition facts
          Danone Actimel plain 0&#37; actually contains 3.3 g of sugar, original plain contains 10.5 g of sugar, multifruit contains 12.0g of sugar for every serving (100g). None of those concentrations are higher than the level defined as “HIGH” by the UK Food Standards Agency (described for concentrations of sugar above 15g per 100g).[34] As a comparison Coca-Cola and orange juices are also in the range of 10g of sugar per 100g, but with a serving size usually higher than 250 ml the total sugar quantity is much higher.

          Through Nutrient profiling guidelines, current health claim regulation in European Union may forbid the use of health claim on food products that are nutritionally unbalanced, but dairy products and probiotic drinks are likely to be considered as favorable carrier because their health benefits outweight the fact they might be high in one of the designated 'unhealthy' ingredients.[35]


          [edit] References
          1.^ a b DanActive: Help strengthen your body's defenses
          2.^ Account Login and Registration
          3.^ How does Actimel help to boost your immune system | Scientific evidence | For Children
          4.^ http://www.actimelusa.com/8044-Lacto...%20study_a.pdf
          5.^ Actimel Ayuda a tus Defensas
          6.^ Danone-et-Vous-Vos-Marques-Actimel
          7.^ Pedone CA, Arnaud CC, Postaire ER, Bouley CF, Reinert P (November 2000). "Multicentric study of the effect of milk fermented by Lactobacillus casei on the incidence of diarrhoea". Int J Clin Pract 54(9): 568–71. PMID 11220983.
          8.^ Pedone CA, Bernabeu AO, Postaire ER, Bouley CF, Reinert P (Apr-May 1999). "The effect of supplementation with milk fermented by Lactobacillus casei (strain DN-114 001) on acute diarrhoea in children attending day care centres". Int J Clin Pract 53(3): 568–71. PMID 10665128.
          9.^ Agarwal KN, Bhasin SK (December 2002). "Feasibility studies to control acute diarrhoea in children by feeding fermented milk preparations Actimel and Indian Dahi". Eur J Clin Nutr 56(4): 56–9. doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601664. PMID 12556949.
          10.^ Giovannini M, Agostoni C, Riva E, Salvini F, Ruscitto A, Zuccotti GV, Radaelli G; Felicita Study Group (August 2007). "A randomized prospective double blind controlled trial on effects of long-term consumption of fermented milk containing Lactobacillus casei in pre-school children with allergic asthma and/or rhinitis". Pediatr Res 62(2): 215–20. doi:10.1203/PDR.0b013e3180a76d94. PMID 17597643.
          11.^ Marcos A, W&#228;rnberg J, Nova E, G&#243;mez S, Alvarez A, Alvarez R, Mateos JA, Cobo JM (December 2004). "The effect of milk fermented by yogurt cultures plus Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 on the immune response of subjects under academic examination stress". Eur J Nutr 43(6): 381–9. doi:10.1007/s00394-004-0517-8. PMID 15309418.
          12.^ Parra MD, Mart&#237;nez de Morentin BE, Cobo JM, Mateos A, Mart&#237;nez JA (June 2004). "Daily ingestion of fermented milk containing Lactobacillus casei DN114001 improves innate-defense capacity in healthy middle-aged people". J Physiol Biochem 60(2): 85–91. PMID 15457926.
          13.^ Parra MD, Mart&#237;nez de Morentin BE, Cobo JM, Mateos A, Mart&#237;nez JA (2004). "Monocyte function in healthy middle-aged people receiving fermented milk containing Lactobacillus casei". J Nutr Health Aging 8(4): 208–11. PMID 15316583.
          14.^ Turchet P, Laurenzano M, Auboiron S, Antoine JM (2003). "Effect of fermented milk containing the probiotic Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 on winter infections in free-living elderly subjects: a randomised, controlled pilot study". J Nutr Health Aging 7(2): 75–7. PMID 12679825.
          15.^ S&#253;kora J, Valeckov&#225; K, Amlerov&#225; J, Siala K, Dedek P, Watkins S, Varvarovsk&#225; J, Stozick&#253; F, Pazdiora P, Schwarz J (September 2005). "Effects of a specially designed fermented milk product containing probiotic Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 and the eradication of H. pylori in children: a prospective randomized double-blind study". J Clin Gastroenterol 39(8): 692–8. doi:10.1097/01.mcg.0000173855.77191.44. PMID 16082279.
          16.^ Pawłowska J, Klewicka E, Czubkowski P, Motyl I, Jankowska I, Libudzisz Z, Teisseyre M, Gliwicz D, Cukrowska B (December 2007). "Effect of Lactobacillus casei DN-114001 application on the activity of fecal enzymes in children after liver transplantation". Transplant Proc 39(10): 3219–21. doi:10.1016/j.transproceed.2007.03.101. PMID 18089357.
          17.^ Use of probiotic Lactobacillus preparation to prevent diarrhoea associated with antibiotics: randomised double blind placebo controlled trial - Hickson et al., 10.1136/bmj.39231.599815.55 - BMJ
          18.^ Actimel drinks stop superbug | The Sun |HomePage|News
          19.^ Doctors unveil latest weapon against hospital superbugs - drinking probiotic yoghurt | Mail Online
          20.^ Decreasing Rates of Illness in Kids (DRINK) - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
          21.^ Home - ClinicalTrials.gov
          22.^ CTV.ca | Dannon sued over probiotic yogurt claims
          23.^ Dannon Refutes Class Action Lawsuit Alleging Misleading Claims | Reuters
          24.^ Foodwatch: Abgespeist: Actimel von Danone. Activer Etikettenschwindel. 17.12.2008. danone_actimel_compactinfo_20081217 http://www.abgespeist.de/actimel/index_ger.html
          25.^ Amann, Susanne: Marketing-Erfolg. Mit Joghurt Millionen scheffeln. Spiegel Online 22.12.2008 http://www.spiegel.de/wirtschaft/0,1...597184,00.html
          26.^ ASA adjudication 1st November 2006 http://www.asa.org.uk/asa/adjudicati..._ADJ_41911.htm
          27.^ ASA adjudication 12th March 2008 http://www.asa.org.uk/asa/adjudicati..._ADJ_44120.htm
          28.^ Meyer AL, Micksche M, Herbacek I, Elmadfa I.: Daily intake of probiotic as well as conventional yogurt has a stimulating effect on cellular immunity in young healthy women. Ann Nutr Metab. 2006;50(3):282-9. Epub 2006 Feb 23. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16508257
          29.^ Guarner, F.; Perdigon, G.; Corthier, G.; Salminen, S.; Koletzko, B.; Morelli, L.: Should yoghurt cultures be considered probiotic? Br J Nutr. 2005 Jun;93(6):783-6. Review. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16022746
          30.^ EFSA releases first health claims guidelines
          31.^ Health claims deadline passes
          32.^ Managing Health Claims for Foods in Canada: Towards a Modernized Framework
          33.^ Canada seeks opinion on health claims review
          34.^ http://www.eatwell.gov.uk/healthydie...arssalt/sugars
          35.^ European nutrient profiling may exempt key food groups

          [edit] External links
          Actimel website
          Actimel website in the UK
          DanActive - Actimel in the US
          Danone - The manufacturers of Actimel
          Dannon - Dannon in the US
          bifidobacteriumanimalis.com - A deconstruction of the terms Bifidus Digestivum, Bifidus Regularis, L. Casei Immunitas and their variants, as well as the marketing strategy, and information about the potential health benefits of live yogurts.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actimel

          .
          "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Vaccine. A probiotic fermented dairy drink improves antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly in two randomised controlled trials.

            Or one would just eat some live kimchi, sauerkraut, real living pickles, a good broad spectrum yogurt, or do like we do, and drink raw milk as well as yogurt and chevre made from that raw milk.

            We also get plenty of sun and fresh air, stay away from HFCS and any sort of junk or boxed food.

            In 1918, "Foods of Commerce" were available but MANY people still ate real honest to goodness foods (though the distillery milk was pure crap and was being pastuerized by then, crap in crap out).

            Now a days, even tho many of us are obese, we are profoundly malnourished by our diets of junk and prepared food.

            Most people's GI NEVER get a proper GI flora set up and the crap we eat may degrade it on a daily basis due to toxins and other dynamics relating to genomic modifications.

            BUT, even if you eat organic, you are still malnourished because the food you are buying is grown in minerally depleted soils or from animals eating minerally depleted soils.

            The human body was much more fit in 1918 for this battle than we are today.

            I am so glad to see these studies because it might help lead people to diets with more whole honest and real foods.
            Nika

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Vaccine. A probiotic fermented dairy drink improves antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly in two randomised controlled trials.

              Adding more white blood cells to enhance the immune system would not be a problem. We don't want to see an enhanced immune system due to pro-inflammatory factors.
              Please do not ask me for medical advice, I am not a medical doctor.

              Avatar is a painting by Alan Pollack, titled, "Plague". I'm sure it was an accident that the plague girl happened to look almost like my twin.
              Thank you,
              Shannon Bennett

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Vaccine. A probiotic fermented dairy drink improves antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly in two randomised controlled trials.

                Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001

                If you wanted to make your own Yorgurt,

                Are there commercial Yogurt products that claim to contain this particular
                Substrain of Lactobacillus? (starter?)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Vaccine. A probiotic fermented dairy drink improves antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly in two randomised controlled trials.

                  Originally posted by Sonny View Post
                  ........
                  Are there commercial Yogurt products that claim to contain this particular
                  Substrain of Lactobacillus? (starter?)
                  I believe DanActive has L. casei.

                  From what I've read, different probiotic strains have different specific health benefits, so we could potentially benefit by utilizing as many strains as possible.

                  Also...

                  L casei is found in milk and many commercially produced yogurts and fermented drinks. Also found in naturally fermented cheeses where it is often one the most numerous of the non-starter bacteria present.
                  http://www.probiotics-lovethatbug.co...lus-casei.html

                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactobacillus_casei

                  .
                  "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Vaccine. A probiotic fermented dairy drink improves antibody response to influenza vaccination in the elderly in two randomised controlled trials.

                    starters with L. Casei:

                    http://www.mannaharvest.net/-p-922773.html

                    http://www.customprobiotics.com/cust...-starter-2.htm

                    http://www.shopwiki.com/YoGourmet+po...yogurt+starter

                    see kefir starter here:
                    http://www.healthgoods.com/ProductDe...ode=YO-STARTER

                    .
                    "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

                    Comment

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