Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Impact of pregnancy on observed sex disparities among adults hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza, FluSurv-NET, 2010-2012

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Impact of pregnancy on observed sex disparities among adults hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza, FluSurv-NET, 2010-2012

    Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2017 Jul 13. doi: 10.1111/irv.12465. [Epub ahead of print]
    Impact of pregnancy on observed sex disparities among adults hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza, FluSurv-NET, 2010-2012.

    Kline K1, Hadler JL1, Yousey-Hindes K1, Niccolai L1, Kirley PD2, Miller L3, Anderson EJ4,5, Monroe ML6, Bohm SR7, Lynfield R8, Bargsten M9, Zansky SM10, Lung K11, Thomas A12, Brady D13, Schaffner W14, Reed G15, Garg S16.
    Author information

    Abstract

    INTRODUCTIO:

    Previous FluSurv-NET studies found that adult females had a higher incidence of influenza-associated hospitalizations than males. To identify groups of women at higher risk than men, we analyzed data from 14 FluSurv-NET sites that conducted population-based surveillance for laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated hospitalizations among residents of 78 U.S. counties.
    METHODS:

    We analyzed 6,292 laboratory-confirmed, geocodable (96%) adult cases collected by FluSurv-NET during the 2010-12 influenza seasons. We used 2010 U.S. Census and 2008-2012 American Community Survey data to calculate overall age-adjusted and age group-specific female:male incidence rate ratios (IRR) by race/ethnicity and census tract-level poverty. We used national 2010 pregnancy rates to estimate denominators for pregnant women ages 18-49. We calculated male:female IRRs excluding them and IRRs for pregnant:non-pregnant women.
    RESULTS:

    Overall, 55% of laboratory-confirmed influenza cases were female. Female:male IRRs were highest for females ages 18-49 of high neighborhood poverty (IRR 1.50, 95% CI 1.30-1.74) and of Hispanic ethnicity (IRR 1.70, 95% CI 1.34-2.17). These differences disappeared after excluding pregnant women. Overall, 26% of 1,083 hospitalized females ages 18-49 were pregnant. Pregnant adult females were more likely to have influenza-associated hospitalizations than their non-pregnant counterparts (relative risk [RR] 5.86, 95% CI 5.12-6.71) but vaccination levels were similar (25.5% vs 27.8%).
    CONCLUSIONS:

    Overall rates of influenza-associated hospitalization were not significantly different for men and women after excluding pregnant women. Among women ages 18-49, pregnancy increased the risk of influenza-associated hospitalization 6-fold but did not increase the likelihood of vaccination. Improving vaccination rates in pregnant women should be an influenza vaccination priority. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.


    KEYWORDS:

    hospitalization; influenza; pregnancy; relative risk; vaccination

    PMID: 28703414 DOI: 10.1111/irv.12465
    Free full text
Working...
X