Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rhinol Online . Characteristics of olfactory dysfunction in patients with long-haul covid-19

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rhinol Online . Characteristics of olfactory dysfunction in patients with long-haul covid-19

    Rhinol Online


    . 2023;6:30-37.
    Epub 2023 Sep 13. Characteristics of olfactory dysfunction in patients with long-haul covid-19

    Meredith M Lamb 1 , Kaitlyn DeHority 2 , Sarah M Russel 1 , Sulgi Kim 1 , Taylor Stack 1 , Ibtisam Mohammad 1 , Abdullah Zeatoun 1 , Cristine Klatt-Cromwell 1 , Charles S Ebert Jr 1 , John M Baratta 2 , Brent A Senior 1 , Adam J Kimple 1



    AffiliationsAbstract

    Background: A subset of individuals suffering from Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) will experience ongoing symptoms that last longer than three months (i.e., long-haul COVID). This includes olfactory dysfunction (OD), which is currently estimated to occur in 1-63.5% of patients at one-year post-infection. However, OD in individuals with long-haul COVID-19 is poorly understood, and there is little information regarding how initial SARS-CoV-2 variants correlate with long-haul symptoms. In this study, we investigated the prevalence and severity of OD in patients with long-haul COVID-19 and investigated how OD severity varied with SARS-CoV-2 variants.
    Methods: Patients were recruited from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill COVID Recovery Clinic. Each patient completed the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). The dominant strain at the time of infection was determined using the date of COVID-19 diagnosis, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, World Health Organization, and North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services databases.
    Results: Nearly 85% of patients with long-haul COVID-19 reported some degree of OD, which persisted in some patients for two or more years from the date of the initial infection. There was no association between the time since COVID-19 infection and severity of OD. No difference was detected between OD in patients with long-haul COVID-19 based on the dominant variant at the time of infection (p=0.0959).
    Conclusion: A vast majority of patients with long-haul COVID-19 had some degree of ongoing olfactory complications, although the severity of symptoms was not dependent on the dominant SARS-CoV-2 variant at the time of infection.

    Keywords: Covid-19 Symptoms; Long-haul COVID-19; Olfactory Dysfunction; Smell Loss; Variants.

    ‚Äč
Working...
X