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Modelling the emergence of influenza drug resistance: The roles of surface proteins, the immune response and antiviral mechanisms

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  • Modelling the emergence of influenza drug resistance: The roles of surface proteins, the immune response and antiviral mechanisms

    PLoS One. 2017 Jul 10;12(7):e0180582. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0180582. eCollection 2017.
    Modelling the emergence of influenza drug resistance: The roles of surface proteins, the immune response and antiviral mechanisms.

    Dobrovolny HM1,2, Beauchemin CAA2,3.
    Author information

    Abstract

    The emergence of influenza drug resistance has become of particular interest as current planning for an influenza pandemic involves using massive amounts of antiviral drugs. We use semi-stochastic simulations to examine the emergence of drug resistant mutants during the course of a single infection within a patient in the presence and absence of antiviral therapy. We specifically examine three factors and their effect on the emergence of drug-resistant mutants: antiviral mechanism, the immune response, and surface proteins. We find that adamantanes, because they act at the start of the replication cycle to prevent infection, are less likely to produce drug-resistant mutants than NAIs, which act at the end of the replication cycle. A mismatch between surface proteins and internal RNA results in drug-resistant mutants being less likely to emerge, and emerging later in the infection because the mismatch gives antivirals a second chance to prevent propagation of the mutation. The immune response subdues slow growing infections, further reducing the probability that a drug resistant mutant will emerge and yield a drug-resistant infection. These findings improve our understanding of the factors that contribute to the emergence of drug resistance during the course of a single influenza infection.


    PMID: 28700622 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0180582
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