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  • How to Cough and Sneeze Without Infecting Other People

    Cough and Sneeze into a tissue or use the Sleeve of your Arm -

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhlYC...eature=related
    Last edited by sharon sanders; December 3, 2010, 11:31 AM. Reason: new link, old one not working

  • #2
    Re: How to Cough and Sneeze Without Infecting Other People

    There is a clever product to help children learn to sneeze and cough into their sleeve/elbow. It's called "germy Worm". It's a box of disposable sleeves with a picture of "germy worm" for the kids to sneeze into. There is also a DVD. See: http://www.germywormy.com/

    I gotta try this out on the grandkids.

    .
    Last edited by Laidback Al; July 23, 2009, 04:20 PM. Reason: Corrected link
    "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

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    • #3
      Re: How to Cough and Sneeze Without Infecting Other People

      (I stand corrected about my statement regarding the value of cotton clothing to "sneeze/cough" into)
      --------------------------------------------------
      Bacteria bound to cloth

      Cloth as a transmitter of infectious agents
      American Journal of Infection Control

      February 2004

      Protecting patients from health care-associated infections is a multifaceted process rooted in the concept that these infections may be caused by pathogens from other patients or hospital personnel. Although health care workers' hands are the primary mechanism of transmission, their clothing also easily can become contaminated and serve as a source of infection transmission. The purpose of this study was to analyze the bacteria-binding properties of different cloth materials. (1)

      Cloth fibers (ie, cotton, nylon, polyester, acrylic, wool) were incubated with bacterial suspensions of standard and clinically isolated strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in silicone-coated tubes. Colony-forming units (CFUs) were determined, and the binding ratios were calculated. Statistical methods, including means and standard deviations, were used to analyze the data and compare observed differences.

      Findings. Staphylococcus aureus strains bound to acrylic, polyester, and wool fibers at very high levels (ie, on average, 87.6%, 96.2%, and 63.2%, respectively). Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains also bound to acrylic, polyester, and wool at high levels (ie, on average, 95.4%, 99.9%, and 84.7%, respectively). Staphylococcus aureus bound to cotton and nylon fibers at very low levels (ie, 2% and 0.9%, respectively), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains bound to cotton and nylon fibers at 15% and 8%, respectively.

      Clinical implications. The results of this study suggest that polyester, acrylic, and wool clothing can be good carriers of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, two major pathogens commonly involved in health care-associated infections. Perioperative nurses and managers should consider these findings when evaluating scrubs or warm-up jackets to be used in perioperative setting.


      http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...0/ai_n6159731/
      "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

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      • #4
        Re: How to Cough and Sneeze Without Infecting Other People

        At our hospital, we have been using that video in Orientation of new staff for a few years. Short, simple and funny - it is always well received and effective.

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        • #5
          Re: How to Cough and Sneeze Without Infecting Other People

          Please see:


          PLoS ONE. Measurements of Airborne Influenza Virus in Aerosol Particles from Human Coughs

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