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  • Homeschool Curriculums

    Here are a few excellent sources to start the thread with, there are many others. If money is an issue, most of this can be purchased used.


    Complete curriculums


    Abeka - www.abeka.com

    Bob Jones University - (offer a satellite dish which broadcasts classes, in addition to or instead of you teaching ) http://www.bjupress.com/webapp/wcs/s...atalogId=10001

    Sonlight - www.sonlight.com



    Individual Subjects

    Apologia Science - http://www.rainbowresource.com/prodl...11&category=60

    Latin - http://www.rainbowresource.com/prodl...5&category=148

    Logic/Thinking Skills - http://www.rainbowresource.com/prodl...12&category=54

    Saxon Math - http://saxonpublishers.harcourtachie...publishers.htm

    Singapore Math - www.singaporemath.com
    "We are in this breathing space before it happens. We do not know how long that breathing space is going to be. But, if we are not all organizing ourselves to get ready and to take action to prepare for a pandemic, then we are squandering an opportunity for our human security"- Dr. David Nabarro

  • #2
    Re: Homeschool Curriculums

    I home schooled both of my sons and can recommend Saxon math. My German sister-in-law looked at one of our books and said it was how Germans learn math. She took home all of our Saxon texts which we had finished for her sons. Many American educators think creativity and lots of colors on the page is what gets the kids' attention, but what really turns kids on is success, even if it means repetition, which, by the way, younger kids love.

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    • #3
      Re: Homeschool Curriculums - SONLIGHT

      Hi,
      By any chance is there anyone here who uses or has used Sonlight in Chile?
      Thank you! Ana Dulce

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      • #4
        Re: Homeschool Curriculums

        Bienvenida Ana!

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        • #5
          Re: Homeschool Curriculums

          We use Switched on Schoolhouse software for the third graders and up, and lifepacs for the younger kids. I love them!
          I bought lifepacs for the older kids as well, in case of power outages. They each have a laptop, I'd like to have solar laptop chargers so they could continue on the software even with no electricity, if I can afford them. The books are good for supplementing and keeping their handwriting neat but the software holds their interest more and keeps track of everything so well, I'd hate to do without it entirely.
          Switched on Schoolhouse and Lifepacs are by alpha omega publishing, you can get it at www.cbd.com or https://store.aop.com/aop/IAFDispatcher
          We're also learning quilting and bread making this year.

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          • #6
            Re: Homeschool Curriculums

            Hi Everyone,

            I use Saxon math for my son and after trying other ones this is the one I chose. It works well for us. WE also use switched on school house for certian subjects and lifpacs too. I have one son being homeschooled, one in public school and one in private school. so if need to I couldswitch them all to homeschool, Theresa

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            • #7
              Re: Homeschool Curriculums

              Games are a great way to help with lateral thinking in maths.

              We have

              Sum Swamp (beginner addition game)

              24 Game (Make 24 using the 4 basic operations)

              Equable (Scrabble with numbers and 4 operations)

              Equations, the game of creative mathematics. (includes root numbers)


              We are always looking for new games. Has any one any suggestions?

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              • #8
                Re: Homeschool Curriculums

                Here are some links. If you can install a webspider and download the resources from these websites BEFORE the Internet goes down. Who knows if the Grid and Internet will work as we approach the 2nd and 3rd waves.

                http://www.thehomeschoolmom.com/

                http://www.homeschool.com/

                http://homeschooling.about.com/

                http://www.homeschoolcentral.com/

                http://www.eskimo.com/~billb/home.html


                A webspider or webcrawler is software that you can download (often free) to down load an enire website, and then store it for offline browsing.

                Wikipedia says:
                A Web crawler is a computer program that browses the World Wide Web in a methodical, automated manner. Other terms for Web crawlers are ants, automatic indexers, bots, and worms[1] or Web spider, Web robot, or—especially in the FOAF community—Web scutter[2].
                This process is called Web crawling or spidering. Many sites, in particular search engines, use spidering as a means of providing up-to-date data. Web crawlers are mainly used to create a copy of all the visited pages for later processing by a search engine that will index the downloaded pages to provide fast searches. Crawlers can also be used for automating maintenance tasks on a Web site, such as checking links or validating HTML code. Also, crawlers can be used to gather specific types of information from Web pages, such as harvesting e-mail addresses (usually for spam).
                A Web crawler is one type of bot, or software agent. In general, it starts with a list of URLs to visit, called the seeds. As the crawler visits these URLs, it identifies all the hyperlinks in the page and adds them to the list of URLs to visit, called the crawl frontier. URLs from the frontier are recursively visited according to a set of policies.
                http://www.midnightbeach.com/hs/

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                • #9
                  Re: Homeschool Curriculums

                  I have homeschooled my kids for over 10 yrs now. For those who are not homeschooling now & want to be prepared in case the kids needs to stay home, I would not really worry about this, esp. if kids are under 10 yo. If they have their workbooks from school you can have them work through that a bit. Mainly I'd just involve them in your daily life - stocking, preparing, gardening, whatevery you're doing. Do build up a good bookshelf of fiction and non-fiction & spend time reading out loud to them daily (& of course stock up on books for them to read themselves).

                  For the over 10's, again I think in the short term what is needed is real life skills of cooking, growing food, repairing things around the house etc etc & just talking, talking, talking about the various things happening and what they mean is ideal, rounded out by access to some basic science, history and maths books. If you get a good first year college math book, it will include a review of all the basic arithmetic & then you can use the same book to go deeper into stats, algebra, geometry, trig and intro to calculus. Do same with science texts. Just pretend this is like a 'camp' where for a while they're out of the classroom & learning about 'real life'.

                  We are an academically rigorous household & we take education seriously. But the hand-wringing that goes on when public school kids 'miss school' like during the recent school closures makes me laugh. My kids learn TONS every day, whether they're doing formal 'lessons' or not. Being in school or doing lessons is not a sign of learning & learning can happen in many different venues & manners.

                  Oh & the plural of curriculum is curricula

                  My faves are:

                  Math: Singapore Math, followed by Life of Fred. We tried Saxon & I think it's an OK program, just not a good fit for my kids.

                  History: Story of the World by Susan Wise Bauer (10 & under); Bauer has a new series for older kids but only the Ancients volume is avail now; Hendrik van Loon's The Story of Mankind is also a good history book.

                  Latin: Minimus for a good intro; followed by Henle

                  Spelling: Explode the Code

                  Grammar: Analytical Grammar

                  French: Pimsleur for general conversation; So You Really Want to Learn French (other languages avail) from Galore Park in the UK for more 'schooly' work

                  Our education model, while heavily influenced by the classical education models (see The Well Trained Mind for example), is basically: "Be kind. Read. Think. Discuss. Think. Write. Think some more. Do."

                  That's it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Homeschool Curriculums

                    Originally posted by hornblower View Post
                    For the over 10's, again I think in the short term what is needed is real life skills of cooking, growing food, repairing things around the house etc etc & just talking, talking, talking about the various things happening and what they mean is ideal, rounded out by access to some basic science, history and maths books. If you get a good first year college math book, it will include a review of all the basic arithmetic & then you can use the same book to go deeper into stats, algebra, geometry, trig and intro to calculus. Do same with science texts. Just pretend this is like a 'camp' where for a while they're out of the classroom & learning about 'real life'.
                    Amen. I was homeschooled out of necessity, in a time when few parents were doing it--my parents' work kept them on the road full time and there were few opportunities to enroll in a regular school. Leaning to "do" is every bit as important is book learning, and most kids appreciate the opportunity. I homeschooled my grandson for two years, and assisted his mother in doing it for another two years after that. Now he's in college, a year ahead of his age group, but just as important, he can cook, garden, care for animals, do simple metal work, and amuse himself, among other things.

                    When I was developing a curriculum for him, I took him to one of the big book stores, and we literally went through shelf after shelf of books to find the ones that were most appropriate for his age and learning style. The fact that he had helped to pick them out was an additional incentive to him to use them without being prodded.

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