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CDC - COVID- 19: Interim Public Health Recommendations for Fully Vaccinated People - March 8, 2021

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  • CDC - COVID- 19: Interim Public Health Recommendations for Fully Vaccinated People - March 8, 2021


    Interim Public Health Recommendations for Fully Vaccinated People


    Updated Mar. 8, 2021
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    Key Points


    This is the first set of public health recommendations for fully vaccinated people. This guidance will be updated and expanded based on the level of community spread of SARS-CoV-2, the proportion of the population that is fully vaccinated, and the rapidly evolving science on COVID-19 vaccines.

    For the purposes of this guidance, people are considered fully vaccinated for COVID-19 ?2 weeks after they have received the second dose in a 2-dose series (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna), or ?2 weeks after they have received a single-dose vaccine (Johnson and Johnson [J&J]/Janssen ).?

    The following recommendations apply to non-healthcare settings.

    Fully vaccinated people can:
    • Visit with other fully vaccinated people indoors without wearing masks or physical distancing
    • Visit with unvaccinated people from a single household who are at low risk for severe COVID-19 disease indoors without wearing masks or physical distancing
    • Refrain from quarantine and testing following a known exposure if asymptomatic

    For now, fully vaccinated people should continue to:
    • Take precautions in public like wearing a well-fitted mask and physical distancing
    • Wear masks, practice physical distancing, and adhere to other prevention measures when visiting with unvaccinated people who are at increased risk for severe COVID-19 disease or who have an unvaccinated household member who is at increased risk for severe COVID-19 disease
    • Wear masks, maintain physical distance, and practice other prevention measures when visiting with unvaccinated people from multiple households
    • Avoid medium- and large-sized in-person gatherings
    • Get tested if experiencing COVID-19 symptoms
    • Follow guidance issued by individual employers
    • Follow CDC and health department travel requirements and recommendations

    On This PageOverview


    Currently authorized vaccines in the United States are highly effective at protecting vaccinated people against symptomatic and severe COVID-19. Additionally, a growing body of evidence suggests that fully vaccinated people are less likely to have asymptomatic infection and potentially less likely to transmit SARS-CoV-2 to others. How long vaccine protection lasts and how much vaccines protect against emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants are still under investigation. Until more is known and vaccination coverage increases, some prevention measures will continue to be necessary for all people, regardless of vaccination status. However, the benefits of reducing social isolation and relaxing some measures such as quarantine requirements may outweigh the residual risk of fully vaccinated people becoming ill with COVID-19 or transmitting SARS-CoV-2 to others. Additionally, taking steps towards relaxing certain measures for vaccinated persons may help improve COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and uptake. Therefore, there are several activities that fully vaccinated people can resume now, at low risk to themselves, while being mindful of the potential risk of transmitting the virus to others.

    For the purposes of this guidance, people are considered fully vaccinated for COVID-19 ?2 weeks after they have received the second dose in a 2-dose series (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna), or ?2 weeks after they have received a single-dose vaccine (Johnson and Johnson [J&J]/Janssen).? This guidance applies to all fully vaccinated people. However, people should discuss with their provider if they have any questions about their individual situation, such as immunocompromising conditions or other concerns.

    This guidance provides recommendations for fully vaccinated people, including:
    • How fully vaccinated people can safely visit with each other or with unvaccinated people in private settings
    • How fully vaccinated people should approach isolation, quarantine, and testing

    In public spaces, fully vaccinated people should continue to follow guidance to protect themselves and others, including wearing a well-fitted mask, physical distancing (at least 6 feet), avoiding crowds, avoiding poorly ventilated spaces, covering coughs and sneezes, washing hands often, and following any applicable workplace or school guidance. Fully vaccinated people should still watch for symptoms of COVID-19, especially following an exposure to someone with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. If symptoms develop, all people ? regardless of vaccination status ? should isolate and be clinically evaluated for COVID-19, including SARS-CoV-2 testing, if indicated.

    CDC will continue to evaluate and update public health recommendations for vaccinated people as more information, including on new variants, becomes available. Further information on evidence and considerations related to these recommendations is available in the new Science Brief.
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    Recommendations for Visiting with Others in Private Settings


    Visits or small gatherings likely represent minimal risk to fully vaccinated people. Medium or large-sized gatherings and those including unvaccinated people from multiple households increase the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission. Though the risk of disease may be minimal to the fully vaccinated person themselves, they should be mindful of their potential risk of transmitting the virus to others if they become infected, especially if they are visiting with unvaccinated people at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 or who have unvaccinated people at increased risk for severe disease in their own households. Fully vaccinated people should not visit or attend a gathering if they have tested positive for COVID-19 in the prior 10 days or are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, regardless of vaccination status of the other people at the gathering.


    Visits between fully vaccinated people


    Indoor visits between fully vaccinated people who do not wear masks or physically distance from one another are likely low risk. For example, if you are fully vaccinated, it is likely a low risk for you to invite other fully vaccinated friends to dinner inside your private residence.
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    Visits between fully vaccinated people and unvaccinated people


    Indoor visits between fully vaccinated people and unvaccinated people who do not wear masks or physically distance from one another are likely low risk for the vaccinated people.

    Therefore, the level of precautions taken should be determined by the characteristics of the unvaccinated people, who remain unprotected against COVID-19.
    Vaccinated people visiting with unvaccinated people from a single household that does not have individuals at risk of severe COVID-19


    If the unvaccinated people are from a single household that does not have individuals at risk of severe COVID-19, they can visit with fully vaccinated people indoors, without anyone wearing masks, with a low risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission. For example, fully vaccinated grandparents can visit indoors with their unvaccinated healthy daughter and her healthy children without wearing masks or physical distancing, provided none of the unvaccinated family members are at risk of severe COVID-19.

    Vaccinated people visiting with unvaccinated people from a single household that has individuals at risk of severe COVID-19


    If any of the unvaccinated people or their household members are at increased risk of severe COVID-19, all attendees should take precautions including wearing a well-fitted mask, staying at least 6 feet away from others, and visiting outdoors or in a well-ventilated space.

    For example, if a fully vaccinated individual visits with an unvaccinated friend who is seventy years old and therefore at risk of severe disease, the visit should take place outdoors, wearing well-fitted masks, and maintaining physical distance (at least 6 feet).

    Vaccinated people visiting with unvaccinated people from multiple households at the same time


    If the unvaccinated people come from multiple households, there is a higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission among them. Therefore, all people involved should take precautions including wearing a well-fitted mask, staying at least 6 feet away from others, and visiting outdoors or in a well-ventilated space.

    Continuing the example from above, if fully vaccinated grandparents are visiting with their unvaccinated daughter and her children and the daughter?s unvaccinated neighbors also come over, the visit should then take place outdoors, wearing well-fitted masks, and maintaining physical distance (at least 6 feet). This is due to the risk the two unvaccinated households pose to one another.

    Medium- or large-sized gatherings


    All people, regardless of vaccination status, should adhere to current guidance to avoid medium- or large-sized in-person gatherings and to follow any applicable local guidance restricting the size of gatherings. If they choose to participate, fully vaccinated people should continue to adhere to prevention measures that reduce spread, including wearing a well-fitted mask, maintaining physical distance from others, and washing hands frequently.

    Other personal or social activities outside the home


    Risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection during public social activities such as dining indoors at a restaurant or going to the gym is lower for fully vaccinated people. However, precautions should still be taken as transmission risk in these settings is higher and likely increases with the number of unvaccinated people present. Thus, fully vaccinated people engaging in social activities in public settings should continue to follow all guidance for these settings including wearing a well-fitted mask, maintaining physical distance (at least 6 feet), avoiding crowds, avoiding poorly ventilated spaces, covering coughs and sneezes, and washing hands frequently.

    Travel


    At this time, CDC is not updating our travel recommendations and requirements.
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    Recommendations for Isolation, Quarantine and Testing


    The following recommendations apply to non-healthcare settings.

    Fully vaccinated people with COVID-19 symptoms


    Although the risk that fully vaccinated people could become infected with COVID-19 is low, any fully vaccinated person who experiences symptoms consistent with COVID-19 should isolate themselves from others, be clinically evaluated for COVID-19, and tested for SARS-CoV-2 if indicated. The symptomatic fully vaccinated person should inform their healthcare provider of their vaccination status at the time of presentation to care.

    Fully vaccinated people with no COVID-like symptoms following an exposure


    Fully vaccinated people with no COVID-like symptoms do not need to quarantine or be tested following an exposure to someone with suspected or confirmed COVID-19, as their risk of infection is low.

    Fully vaccinated people who do not quarantine should still monitor for symptoms of COVID-19 for 14 days following an exposure. If they experience symptoms, they should isolate themselves from others, be clinically evaluated for COVID-19, including SARS-CoV-2 testing, if indicated, and inform their health care provider of their vaccination status at the time of presentation to care.

    Fully vaccinated residents of non-healthcare congregate settings


    Fully vaccinated residents of non-healthcare congregate settings (e.g., correctional and detention facilities, group homes) should continue to quarantine for 14 days and be tested for SARS-CoV-2 following an exposure to someone with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. This is because residential congregate settings may face high turnover of residents, a higher risk of transmission, and challenges in maintaining recommended physical distancing.

    Fully vaccinated employees of non-healthcare congregate settings and other high-density workplaces


    Fully vaccinated employees of non-healthcare congregate settings and other high-density workplaces (e.g., meat and poultry processing and manufacturing plants) with no COVID-like symptoms do not need to quarantine following an exposure; however testing following an exposure and through routine workplace screening programs (if present) is still recommended.
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    ?This guidance applies to COVID-19 vaccines currently authorized for emergency use by the Food and Drug Administration: Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Johnson and Johnson [J&J]/Janssen COVID-19 vaccines. Considerations for applying this guidance to vaccines that are not FDA-authorized include whether the vaccine product has received emergency approval from the World Health Organization or authorization from a national regulatory agency.

    Last Updated Mar. 8, 2021


    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...-guidance.html
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