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  • #46

    COVIDView: A Weekly Surveillance Summary of U.S. COVID-19 Activity


    Updated Feb. 5, 2021
    Print
    Starting Friday, February 12, 2021, COVIDView will be replaced with the COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review. This new webpage and newsletter will highlight key data from CDC’s COVID Data Tracker, narrative interpretations of the data, and visualizations from the week. The new Weekly Review will also summarize important trends in the pandemic and bring together CDC data and reporting in a centralized location. It represents the extensive data that CDC uses to track the pandemic on a daily basis and will incorporate additional data sources in the future. Sign up to have the COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review delivered to your inbox every week.

    Download Weekly Summary pdf icon[981 KB, 11 Pages]
    Key Updates for Week 4, ending January 30, 2021


    Nationally, surveillance indicators tracking levels of SARS-CoV-2 circulation, associated illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths remain elevated but show decreasing trends in recent weeks. Both COVID-19-associated hospitalizations and pneumonia, influenza, and COVID-19 (PIC) mortality for the most recent weeks may increase as more data are received.


    Download Chart Data excel icon[CSV – 2 KB]
    Virus: Public Health, Commercial and Clinical Laboratories


    Nationally, the overall percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing COVID-19, decreased from 11.2% during week 3 to 9.7% during week 4. Percent positivity decreased in all ten Health and Human Services (HHS) regionsexternal icon and decreased among all age groups.
    Mild/Moderate Illness: Outpatient and Emergency Department Visits


    Nationally, the percentage of visits to outpatient providers or emergency departments (EDs) for COVID-like illness (CLI) and influenza-like illness (ILI) decreased during week 4 compared with week 3. All ten HHS regions reported a decrease in at least one indicator of mild/moderate illness.
    Severe Disease: Hospitalizations and Deaths


    For the past three months, the overall weekly hospitalization rate has remained in an elevated plateau above earlier peaks in the pandemic. Rates in recent weeks are likely to increase as additional data are reported. Based on death certificate data, the percentage of deaths attributed to pneumonia, influenza, or COVID-19 (PIC) for week 4 was 28.4%, and it remains above the epidemic threshold.

    All data are preliminary and may change as more reports are received. A description of the surveillance systems summarized in COVIDView, including methodology and detailed descriptions of each data component, is available on the surveillance methods page.
    Key Points
    • Nationally, the overall percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 decreased during week 4 (9.7%) compared with week 3 (11.2 %). The percent positivity has declined nationally over the past four weeks since the week ending January 2, 2021 (15.4%).
      • Percent positivity decreased among all age groups in all ten HHS regions.
      • For nine of ten HHS regions, (Regions 2 [New Jersey/New York/Puerto Rico], 3 [Mid-Atlantic], 4 [Southeast], 5 [Midwest], 6 [South Central], 7 [Central], 8 [Mountain], 9 [South/West Central], and 10 [Pacific Northwest]), percent positivity decreased over the past four weeks.
      • Percent positivity in Region 1 [New England] is showing a 3 week decline.
    • Surveillance indicators of mild to moderate illness at the national level declined or remained stable (<0.1% change) during recent weeks. CLI decreased during the past three weeks after increasing from late September 2020 through early January 2021. ILI increased from October through December, and has shown a decreasing trend during January.
      • All ten HHS regions reported a decrease in at least one indicator of mild to moderate illness (CLI and/or ILI) during week 4 compared with week 3 and have a reported an overall decreasing trend in all three indicators of mild to moderate illness during the past several weeks.
    • The overall cumulative COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate through the week ending January 30, 2021 was 417.2 hospitalizations per 100,000 population.
      • For the past three months, the overall weekly hospitalization rate has remained in an elevated plateau above earlier peaks in the pandemic. Rates in recent weeks are likely to increase as additional data are reported.
      • When examining age-adjusted hospitalization rates by race and ethnicity, compared with non-Hispanic White persons, cumulative hospitalization rates were 3.6 times higher among non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native persons, 3.2 times higher among Hispanic or Latino persons, and 2.9 times higher among non-Hispanic Black persons.
    • The percentage of deaths due to PIC increased from the beginning of October through the week ending January 9, 2021 (32.7%). Mortality attributed to PIC exceeded the percentage of deaths due to PIC observed at any other point during the pandemic for nine consecutive weeks from early December through the week ending January 30, 2021.
      • Nationally, the weekly percentage of deaths due to PIC decreased from week 3 (31.0%) to week 4 (28.4%) and has been decreasing since the first week of January. Data from recent weeks may change as additional data are received.

    U.S. Virologic Surveillance


    Based on data reported to CDC by public health laboratories and a subset of clinical and commercial laboratories in the United States, 114,175,816 specimens were tested for SARS-CoV-2 using a molecular assay since March 1, 2020. The percentage of specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 each week, based on week of specimen collection, are summarized below.

    Nationally, 230,277 (9.7%) of 2,375,248 specimens tested for SARS-CoV-2 for diagnostic purposes were positive during week 4. This is a decrease compared with week 3, during which 11.2% of specimens tested were positive. The percentage of specimens testing positive decreased among all age groups.




    *Note: Different laboratory types came on board with testing during different weeks. This graph includes public health laboratory data beginning in week 10, clinical laboratory data beginning in week 11, and commercial laboratory data beginning in week 14.
    View Data Table


    During week 4 compared with week 3, the percentage of specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 decreased in all HHS regions.

    Additional virologic surveillance information: Surveillance Methods


    Outpatient/Emergency Department Illness


    Two syndromic surveillance systems, the U.S. Outpatient Influenza-like Illness Surveillance Network (ILINet) and the National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP), are being used to monitor trends in outpatient and emergency department (ED) visits that may be associated with COVID-19 illness. Each system monitors activity in a slightly different set of providers/facilities and uses a slightly different set of symptoms that may be associated with SARS-CoV-2 virus infection. ILINet provides information about visits to outpatient providers or emergency departments for influenza-like illness (ILI: fever plus cough and/or sore throat) and NSSP provides information about visits to EDs for ILI and COVID-like illness (CLI: fever plus cough and/or shortness of breath or difficulty breathing). Some EDs contribute ILI data to both ILINet and NSSP. Both systems currently are being affected by changes in health care seeking behavior, including increased use of telemedicine and increased social distancing. These changes affect the numbers of people seeking care in the outpatient and ED settings. Syndromic data, including CLI and ILI, should be interpreted with caution and should be evaluated in combination with other sources of surveillance data, especially laboratory testing results, to obtain a complete and accurate picture of respiratory illness.

    Nationally, the overall percentages of visits to EDs decreased for CLI and remained stable (change ≤0.1%) for ILI during week 4 compared with week 3. During week 4, the percentages of ED visits captured in NSSP for CLI and ILI were 5.1% and 1.0%, respectively. In ILINet, 1.1% of visits to outpatient providers or EDs reported during week 4 were for ILI, decreasing compared with week 3 and below the national baseline for the 42nd consecutive week. This level of ILI is lower than is typical for ILINet during this time of year.

    resize iconView LargerView Data Table


    The percentages of visits for ILI reported in ILINet in week 4 remained stable (change of ≤0.1%) for all age groups (0–4 years, 5–24 years, 25–49 years, 50–64 years, and 65 years and older) compared with week 3. However, during the past three weeks there has been a slightly increasing trend among those 0–4 years and a slightly decreasing trend among the remaining age groups.

    resize iconView LargerView Data Table


    On a regional levelexternal icon, during week 4 compared with week 3, all ten regions reported a decreasing level of CLI and a stable (change of ≤0.1%) or decreasing level of ILI.

    ILI Activity Levels

    Data collected in ILINet are used to produce a measure of ILI activity for all 50 states, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, the District of Columbia, New York City, and for each core-based statistical area (CBSA) where at least one provider is located. The mean reported percentage of visits due to ILI for the current week is compared with the mean reported during non-influenza weeks, and the activity levels correspond to the number of standard deviations below, at, or above the mean.

    The number of jurisdictions at each activity level during week 4 and the previous week are summarized in the table below.
    Activity Level Number of Jurisdictions Number of CBSAs
    Week 4 (Week ending Jan. 30, 2021) Week 3 (Week ending Jan. 23, 2021) Week 4 (Week ending Jan. 30, 2021) Week 3 (Week ending Jan. 23, 2021)
    Very High 0 0 0 0
    High 0 0 2 3
    Moderate 0 0 5 4
    Low 0 1 19 22
    Minimal 54 53 587 602
    Insufficient Data 1 1 316 298
    *Note: Data collected in ILINet may disproportionally represent certain populations within a state and may not accurately depict the full picture of respiratory disease activity for the whole state. Differences in the data presented here by CDC and independently by some state health departments likely represent differing levels of data completeness with data presented by the state likely being the more complete.

    Additional information about medically attended outpatient and emergency department visits for ILI and CLI: Surveillance Methods

    Hospitalizations


    The COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) conducts population-based surveillance for laboratory-confirmed COVID-19-associated hospitalizations in select counties participating in the Emerging Infections Program (EIP) and the Influenza Hospitalization Surveillance Project (IHSP).

    A total of 136,007 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19-associated hospitalizations were reported by sites between March 1, 2020, and January 30, 2021. The overall cumulative hospitalization rate was 417.2 per 100,000 population. For the past three months, since the week ending November 7, 2020 (MMWR Week 45), the overall weekly hospitalization rate has remained in an elevated plateau above earlier peaks in the pandemic. The hospitalization rates for the most recent week are expected to be higher as additional data are reported in future weeks.

    resize iconView Larger


    1Additional hospitalization rate data by age group are available.

    Among the 136,007 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19-associated hospitalizations, 132,932 (97.7%) had information on race and ethnicity, while collection of race and ethnicity was still pending for 3,075 (2.3%) cases. When examining age-adjusted hospitalization rates by race and ethnicity, compared with non-Hispanic White persons, hospitalization rates were 3.6 times higher among non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native persons, 3.2 times higher among Hispanic or Latino persons, and 2.9 times higher among non-Hispanic Black persons.





    When examining age-stratified crude hospitalization rates by race and ethnicity, compared with non-Hispanic White persons in the same age group, crude hospitalization rates were 4.0 times higher among Hispanic or Latino persons aged 0–17 years,6.5 times higher among Non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native persons aged 18–49 years,4.6 times higher among non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native persons aged 50–64 years, and 2.3 times higher among non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native and non-Hispanic Black persons aged >65 years.

    37.0 2.8 39.9 3.1 51.7 4.0 17.6 1.4 13.0 1.0
    638.0 6.5 372.7 3.8 518.7 5.3 123.3 1.3 98.5 1.0
    1454.2 4.6 1080.3 3.4 1255.5 3.9 390.6 1.2 318.5 1.0
    2208.0 2.3 2173.7 2.3 2114.2 2.2 864.7 0.9 960.9 1.0
    901.7 3.6 708.4 2.9 794.0 3.2 260.2 1.1 247.3 1.0
    1 COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates by race and ethnicity are calculated using COVID-NET hospitalizations with known race and ethnicity for the numerator and NCHS bridged-race population estimates for the denominator.
    2 For each age category, rate ratios are the ratios between crude hospitalization rates within each racial and ethnic group and the crude hospitalization rate among non-Hispanic White persons in the same age category.
    3 The highest rate ratio in each age category is presented in bold.
    4 Overall rates are adjusted to account for differences in age distributions within race and ethnicity strata in the COVID-NET catchment area; the age strata used for the adjustment include 0–17, 18–49, 50–64, 65-74, 75-84 and 85+ years.

    Non-Hispanic White persons and non-Hispanic Black persons represented the highest proportions of hospitalizations reported to COVID-NET, followed by Hispanic or Latino, non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander, and non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native persons. However, some racial and ethnic groups are disproportionately represented among hospitalizations compared with the overall population of the catchment area. Prevalence ratios were highest among non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native persons, followed by non-Hispanic Black persons and Hispanic or Latino persons.
    1.3% 26.6% 19.6% 5.1% 41.4%
    0.7% 17.9% 14.1% 8.9% 58.5%
    1.9 1.5 1.4 0.6 0.7
    1Persons of multiple races (0.3%) or unknown race and ethnicity (5.6%) are not represented in the table but are included as part of the denominator.
    2 Prevalence ratio is calculated as the ratio of the proportion of COVID-NET hospitalizations over the proportion of population in COVID-NET catchment area.

    For underlying medical conditions, data were restricted to cases reported during March 1–November 30, 2020, due to delays in reporting. During this time frame, sampling was conducted among hospitalized adults; therefore, weighted percentages are reported. No sampling was conducted among hospitalized children. Among 17,452 sampled adults hospitalized during March 1–November 30 with information on underlying medical conditions, 90.9% had at least one reported underlying medical condition. The most reported underlying medical conditions were hypertension (56.1%), obesity (49.1%), metabolic disease (42.1%), which includes diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (33.2%). Among 1,369 children hospitalized during March 1–November 30, 2020 with information on underlying conditions, 52.7% had at least one reported underlying medical condition. The most reported underlying medical conditions were obesity (37.4%), neurologic disease (12.9%), and asthma (11.7%).

    Additional data on demographics, signs and symptoms at admission, underlying medical conditions, interventions, outcomes, and discharge diagnoses, stratified by age, sex, and race and ethnicity, are available.

    Additional hospitalization surveillance information:
    Surveillance Methods | Additional rate data | Additional demographic and clinical data


    Mortality Surveillance


    The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) collects death certificate data from vital statistics offices for all deaths occurring in the United States. Based on death certificate data available on February 4, 2021, the percentage of deaths attributed to pneumonia, influenza, or COVID-19 (PIC) during week 4 was 28.4%; it remains above the epidemic threshold of 7.1%. This percentage is expected to increase as more death certificates are processed. Among the 6,424 PIC deaths reported for week 4, 5,648 had COVID-19 listed as an underlying or contributing cause of death on the death certificate and four listed influenza, indicating that the recent increase in PIC mortality is due primarily to COVID-19 and not influenza.

    The weekly percentage of deaths due to PIC reached the highest point in the pandemic during the week ending January 9, 2021 (32.7%), and exceeded the previous peak (27.7% in April 2020) for nine consecutive weeks through the current week. Data for the past three weeks show a declining trend in the percentage of deaths due to PIC compared to the December peak, but this percentage is expected to change as additional death certificates are processed. Weekly mortality surveillance data include a combination of machine coded and manually coded causes of death collected from death certificates. Prior to week 4 (the week ending January 30, 2021), the percentages of deaths due to (PIC) were higher among manually coded records than more rapidly available machine coded records. Improvements have been made to the machine coding process that allow for more COVID-19 related deaths to be machine coded, and going forward, the percentage of PIC deaths among machine coded and manually coded data are expected to be more similar. The data presented are preliminary and expected to change as more data are received and processed but the amount of change in the percentage of deaths due to PIC should be lower going forward. Weeks for which the largest changes in the percentage of deaths due to PIC may occur are highlighted in gray in the figure below and should be interpreted with caution.

    resize iconView Larger


    *Data during recent weeks are incomplete because of the lag in time between when the death occurred and when the death certificate is completed, submitted to NCHS and processed for reporting purposes. It is possible that a death certificate includes both influenza and COVID as a cause of death; therefore, the number of influenza and COVID coded deaths may not be mutually exclusive.
    View Data Table


    Additional NCHS mortality surveillance information: Surveillance Methods | Provisional Death Counts for COVID-19
    More Information
    View Page In:pdf icon 981 KB, 11 Pages

    Comment


    • #47
      New format....

      COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


      Updated Feb. 12, 2021
      Print
      Subscribe to the Weekly Review
      Interpretative Summary for February 12, 2021
      “Better, but not good enough”


      Don’t let your guard (or mask) down. COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths continue to trend downward. But even with that progress, the daily numbers of new cases and deaths remain much higher than the first two peaks of the pandemic in the spring and summer of 2020.

      The COVID-19 pandemic has crossed the one-year mark. About 27 million cases and about 470,000 deaths have been reported to CDC since the first case was identified in the United States on January 20, 2020. The numbers of COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths vary substantially below the national level, and to help explain these differences future versions of COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review will present surveillance trends at the regional, state, or county levels. A national milestone in vaccinations was reached this week on February 11 with about 34.7 million people receiving at least one dose of vaccine, which is 10.5% of the U.S. population. This is terrific progress.

      CDC’s goal is to get the pandemic under control as quickly as possible, both to save lives and to help people get back to the many important things they need and want to do. The emergence of variants, such as B.1.1.7, reminds us that we all need to re-double our efforts to prevent the spread of COVID-19. It is more important than ever that we all wear well-fitting masks, stay at least 6 feet apart from people we don’t live with, avoid crowds and poorly ventilated spaces, and wash our hands often. These practices done well by all of us, together with the continued effort to vaccinate more people, can help end this pandemic.


      Reported Cases


      Compared with a national peak of 314,093 cases reported to CDC on January 8, 2021, the daily number of cases has declined by 69%. The current 23% decrease in the 7-day average number of daily cases reported also provides an encouraging sign of recent progress. Even with these declines, however, the 97,309 cases reported on February 11 remains higher than what was seen during either of the first two peaks in the pandemic.

      97,309
      New Cases Reported

      104,217
      Current 7-Day Average

      27,127,858
      Total Cases Reported

      134,524
      Prior 7-Day Average

      314,093
      High

      -22.5%
      Change in 7-Day Average

      Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

      7-Day moving average


      More data.
      resize iconView Larger
      More Case Data

      Vaccinations


      The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14. As of February 11, 2021, 46.4 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 34.7 million people have received at least one dose of vaccine, which is 10.5% of the U.S. population, and about 11.2 million people have received two doses of vaccine, which is 3.4% of the U.S. population. As of February 11, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 1.6 million, which was a 24% acceleration from the previous week.

      46,390,270
      Vaccines Administered

      34,732,964
      People who received 1 or more doses

      11,188,782
      People who received 2 doses

      Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


      7-Day moving average


      More data.
      resize iconView Larger
      More Vaccination Data

      New Hospital Admissions


      The numbers of new hospital admissions of patients with confirmed COVID-19 have decreased from the national peak of 18,081 admissions on January 5, 2021 to 8,957 admissions on February 9 (a 50% decrease). The average number of daily admissions fell by 14% over the past week.

      8,957
      New Admissions

      9,279
      Current 7-Day Average

      1,690,996
      Total New Admissions

      10,845
      Prior 7-Day Average

      18,081
      High

      -14.4%
      Change in 7-Day Average

      Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States Reported to CDC


      More data.external icon Data for most recent week are affected by incomplete reporting (grey shaded area).
      resize iconView Larger
      More Hospital Dataexternal icon

      Deaths


      Nationally, the number of COVID-19 deaths peaked on February 4, 2021 at 5,189 deaths reported. Though the 3,645 deaths reported on February 11 is substantially lower (30% decrease), the current change in the 7-day average number of deaths was negligible (1.4% decrease). Daily mortality remains higher than in previous waves of the pandemic.

      3,645
      New Deaths Reported

      3,013
      Current 7-Day Average

      470,110
      Total Deaths Reported

      3,056
      Prior 7-Day Average

      5,189
      High

      -1.4%
      Change in 7-Day Average

      Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

      7-Day moving average


      More data.
      resize iconView Larger
      More Death Data

      SARS-CoV-2 Variants


      Three SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) variants of concern have been detected in the United States: B.1.1.7, B.1.351, and P.1. A total of 981 B.1.1.7 variant cases have been detected in 37 states, which is a 61% increase in the number of B.1.1.7 cases reported by CDC compared with the previous week (611 cases). Thirteen cases with B.1.351 in five states and three cases with P.1 in two other states have also been detected in the United States. CDC and partners are increasing the numbers of specimens sequenced in laboratories around the country. Studies to determine whether variants cause more severe illness or are likely to evade immunity are underway. For technical description, see https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...nts/index.html.

      Variant

      Reported Cases in US

      Number of States with ≥1 Case Reported

      B.1.1.7

      981

      37

      B.1.351

      13

      5

      P.1

      3

      2

      Emerging Variant Cases of B.1.1.7 in the United States


      More data.
      resize iconView Larger
      More Variants Data
      Note on new format: Effective Friday, February 12, 2021, COVIDView has been replaced with this new COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review. This new webpage and newsletter include key visuals from the week and narrative interpretations using data from CDC’s COVID Data Tracker. Additional priority data will be added in future weeks, including race and ethnicity.

      The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of over 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

      Other new data views on CDC’s website include county-specific summaries (under “Your Community” in Data Tracker), vaccination trends (under “Your Community” in Data Tracker), and information on SARS-CoV-2 variants.


      https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...covidview.html

      Comment


      • #48

        COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review for February 19, 2021


        Updated Feb. 19, 2021
        Print
        Subscribe to the Weekly Review


        Interpretative Summary for February 19, 2021
        Stop variants by stopping the spread


        Viruses change (or mutate) all the time. While most changes do not affect how the virus behaves, every time a virus makes a copy of itself (or replicates) it has the potential to produce a variant virus that can spread more easily, cause more severe disease, or resist the body’s ability to fight them naturally or with vaccination. The best way to stop new variants from emerging is to stop the virus from spreading within our communities.

        Just as we are working to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, emerging variants are threatening progress. If one of the variants is able to evade the vaccine, our progress will be slowed or potentially reversed. Our window of opportunity to halt the pandemic is now.

        Three SARS-CoV-2 variants in particular have concerned global public health and healthcare leaders to date. This week, CDC published three reports on two of the variants. 1,2,3 Data from two new MMWR reports highlight how these variants present challenges both in the United States and internationally. One report showed that people in Minnesota with no recent travel to the United Kingdom (U.K.) were infected with the B.1.1.7 variant, first detected in the U.K. late last year. Another report found sharp increases in COVID-19 cases in Zambia that corresponded with an increase in infections caused by the variant that recently emerged in South Africa (the B.1.351 variant).

        By the time a variant is detected in a community, it may already be spreading. Proven strategies to prevent spread can limit the impact of these variants. We can stop variants by decreasing cases. Everyone should wear a well-fitting mask and follow CDC’s prevention recommendations.


        SARS-CoV-2 Variants


        Three SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) variants of concern have been detected in the United States: B.1.1.7, B.1.351, and P.1.

        The B.1.1.7 variant was first detected in the United Kingdom in December 2020 and likely first emerged there in September 2020. Colorado reported the first U.S. case of the B.1.1.7 variant in late December 2020. Since then, B.1.1.7 has been detected in at least 42 jurisdictions. Preliminary data from the United Kingdom suggest that the B.1.1.7 variant spreads more easily and may cause more severe disease than previous variants of SARS-CoV-2.4

        The B.1.351 variant was first detected in the Republic of South Africa in December 2020, and likely first emerged there in October 2020. At least 35 countries, including the United States, have detected COVID-19 cases of infection with the B.1.351 variant. The first detected U.S. cases of infection with the B.1.351 variant occurred in South Carolina and Maryland in late January 2021 and have now been documented in at least 10 jurisdictions. Some data suggest that people previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 may have less immune protection if they are re-infected with the B.1.351 variant.

        The P.1 variant was first detected in Japan in travelers from Brazil in January 2021. Minnesota reported the first U.S. case of infection with the P.1 variant in January 2021 and P.1 has now been identified in Oklahoma, Maryland, and Florida.

        Modeling data have shown that a more contagious variant could lead to more cases, which would worsen the U.S. pandemic and reverse the recent decreases in numbers of new COVID-19 cases reported.5

        A total of 1,523 B.1.1.7 variant cases have been reported in 42 jurisdictions. Twenty-one cases with B.1.351 in 10 jurisdictions and five cases with P.1 in four other states have also been detected in the United States. CDC and partners are increasing the numbers of specimens sequenced in laboratories around the country. The number of variants reported will likely increase as more specimens are sequenced and if the frequency of variants increases. Studies to determine whether variants cause more severe illness or are likely to evade immunity are underway.

        Emerging Variant Cases of B.1.1.7 in the United States


        More data.
        resize iconView Larger
        More Variants Data
        Variant

        Reported Cases in US

        Number of States with ≥1 Case Reported

        B.1.1.7

        1,523

        42

        B.1.351

        21

        10

        P.1

        5

        4




        Reported Cases


        There has been a five-week downward trend in cases. The highest 7-day moving average occurred on January 11, 2021 and was 249,048. The current 7-day average is 77,385 cases, which is a 68.9% decline. The 24.5% decrease in the 7-day average number of daily cases reported compared with the prior week also provides an encouraging sign of recent progress. Even with these declines, however, the 69,165 cases reported on February 17 remains higher than what was seen during either of the first two peaks in the pandemic.

        69,165
        New Cases Reported

        77,385
        Current 7-Day Average

        27,669,556
        Total Cases Reported

        102,531
        Prior 7-Day Average

        314,972
        Peak*

        -24.5%
        Change in 7-Day Average

        *Highest peak for new cases in a single day (Jan. 8, 2021).

        Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

        7-Day moving average


        More data.
        resize iconView Larger
        More Case Data



        Testing


        Percent positivity continues to decline. The 7-day average of percent positivity from RT-PCR tests is now 5.9%. Six states or territories remain over 10% positivity. The 7-day average test volume for February 5–11, 2021 was 1,221,104, down 16% from 1,452,976 the prior 7 days.

        317,819,568
        Total Tests Reported

        1,221,104
        7-Day Average Test

        5.9%
        7-Day Average % Positivity

        -15.6%
        Change in 7-Day % Positivity

        COVID-19 Viral (RT-PCR) Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


        More data.
        resize iconView Larger
        More Testing Dataexternal icon



        Vaccinations


        The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14. As of February 18, 2021, 57.7 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 41.0 million people have received at least one dose of vaccine, which is 12.4% of the U.S. population, and about 16.2 million people have received two doses of vaccine, which is 4.9% of the U.S. population. As of February 18, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 1.6 million, which was a 1.4% acceleration from the previous week.

        57,737,767
        Vaccines Administered

        41,021,049
        People who received 1 or more doses

        16,162,358
        People who received 2 doses

        Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


        7-Day moving average


        More data.
        resize iconView Larger
        More Vaccination Data



        New Hospital Admissions


        The numbers of new hospital admissions of patients with confirmed COVID-19 have decreased from the national peak of 18,006 admissions on January 5, 2021 to 6,841 admissions on February 16 (a 62% decrease). The average number of daily admissions fell by 21.8% compared to the previous week.

        6,841
        New Admissions

        7,229
        Current 7-Day Average

        1,730,332
        Total New Admissions

        9,244
        Prior 7-Day Average

        18,006
        Peak

        -21.8%
        Change in 7-Day Average

        Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States Reported to CDC


        More data.external icon Data for most recent week are affected by incomplete reporting (grey shaded area).
        resize iconView Larger
        More Hospital Dataexternal icon



        Deaths


        Nationally, the number of COVID-19 deaths continue to fluctuate. There were 489,067 total COVID-19 deaths reported with 2,601 new deaths reported as of February 17, 2021. The 7-day average number of new deaths decreased by 9% to 2,708** new deaths per day compared to the previous 7-day period.

        2,601
        New Deaths Reported

        2,708
        Current 7-Day Average**

        489,067
        Total Deaths Reported

        2,975
        Prior 7-Day Average

        5,520
        Peak*

        -9.0%
        Change in 7-Day Average



        * Highest peak for new deaths in a single day (Feb. 12, 2021). Please reference notes below for more detail.

        ** The 7-day average number of new deaths is impacted by a historical correction of 1,507 deaths on February 4, 2021 by Indiana, and 3,763 new deaths reported February 12-13, 2021 by Ohio. These reported deaths in Ohio include historical deaths reconciled from November and December. Without these historical corrections, the current 7-day average of new deaths is 2,171.

        Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

        7-Day moving average


        More data.
        resize iconView Larger
        More Death Data


        Recent Publications
        1. Notes from the Field: First identified cases of SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.7 in Minnesota — December 2020–January 2021
        2. Detection of B.1.351 SARS-CoV-2 Variant Strain — Zambia, December 2020
        3. SARS-CoV-2 Variants of Concern in the United States: Challenges and Opportunitiesexternal icon
        4. Horby P, Huntley C, Davies N, et al. NERVTAG note on B.1.1.7 severity. SAGE meeting report. January 21, 2021 pdf icon[81 KB, 9 Pages]external icon.
        5. Emergence of SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 Lineage — United States, December 29, 2020–January 12, 2021

        Notes

        Note on new format: Effective Friday, February 12, 2021, COVIDView has been replaced with this new COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review. This new webpage and newsletter include visuals from the week and narrative interpretations using data from CDC’s COVID Data Tracker. Additional priority data will be added in future weeks, including race and ethnicity.

        The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of over 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

        Other new data views on CDC’s website include county-specific summaries (under “Your Community” in Data Tracker), vaccination trends (under “Your Community” in Data Tracker), and information on SARS-CoV-2 variants.
        Last Updated Feb. 19, 2021

        https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019.../02192021.html

        Comment


        • #49


          COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


          Updated Feb. 26, 2021
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          Interpretative Summary for February 26, 2021
          Safer Communities Mean Safer Schools


          Almost a year ago, as the COVID-19 pandemic started affecting our communities, schools throughout the country turned to virtual learning to help protect students, teachers, school staff, and their families. Today, schools use different strategies to prevent spread. Some teach class online, while others have opened safely and conduct in-person learning using multiple prevention strategies, even in areas with relatively high levels of community spread. Recent studies in schools that strictly followed multiple prevention strategies found that most cases in schools came from community spread of disease, not from spread within the school itself.1,2,3 This means that each community has an opportunity to help schools return to in-person learning and make them safer by making their own community safer. How do we do that?

          There are three important areas where we need to focus our attention to make communities safer.

          1) Prevent spread to make your community safer
          CDC recently published guidance for schools that highlights the critical need for communities to reduce spread to ensure a safe return to school and other activities. Communities that reduce the level of COVID-19 spread will foster greater opportunities for schools to safely return to in-person learning. Here are 6 steps to a safer community that each of us can do:
          1. Wear a well-fitting mask
          2. Stay 6 feet apart
          3. Avoid gatherings
          4. Wash hands often
          5. Stay home when you are sick
          6. Get vaccinated when vaccine is available to you

          To see data from your community, visit CDC’s COVID Data Tracker.

          2) Increase testing
          The number of COVID-19 tests people are getting continues to decline nationally. The average volume of tests over a seven-day period is down 20.2% from last week. Anyone who has symptoms of COVID-19 should be tested. Anyone who has been around someone with COVID-19 should also be tested. Additionally, last week the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announcedexternal icon efforts to expand COVID-19 testing for schools and people living and gathering in group settings, such as homeless shelters. By increasing testing, we can quickly identify people who have COVID-19 and isolate them from others, take steps to prevent further spread, and better address the threat of variants.

          3) Continue rapid vaccination scale-up
          Vaccination rates continue to increase and as of February 25, 2021, 13.9% of the U.S. population has received one or more doses of the vaccine. Additional data were released this week to visually show how many people in each state and nationally have been vaccinated. Vaccinating more adults, including essential workers such as teachers and educational staff, is critical to curbing the pandemic.


          Reported Cases


          There has been a six-week downward trend in cases. The highest 7-day average of 249,303 occurred on January 11, 2021. The current 7-day average is 66,348 cases, a 73.4% decline. The 13.5% decrease in the 7-day average number of daily cases reported compared with the prior week provides an encouraging sign of recent progress. Even with these declines, the 74,806 cases reported on February 24 remains much higher than what was seen during the first peak in the pandemic.

          74,806
          New Cases Reported

          66,348
          Current 7-Day Average

          28,138,938
          Total Cases Reported

          76,741
          Prior 7-Day Average

          249,303
          Peak*

          -13.5%
          Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

          *Highest peak for 7-day average (January 11, 2021).

          Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

          7-Day moving average


          More data.
          resize iconView Larger
          More Case Data



          SARS-CoV-2 Variants


          CDC is closely tracking variants of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Three variants of concern have been detected in the United States: B.1.1.7, B.1.351, and P.1. A total of 2,102 B.1.1.7 variant cases have been reported in 45 jurisdictions. Forty-nine cases with B.1.351 in 15 jurisdictions and six cases with P.1 in five states have also been detected in the United States. CDC and partners are increasing the numbers of specimens sequenced in laboratories around the country. The number of variants reported will likely increase as more specimens are sequenced and if the frequency of variants increases. Studies are underway to determine whether variants cause more severe illness or are likely to evade immunity brought on by prior illness or vaccination.

          Variant

          Reported Cases in US

          Number of Jurisdictions with ≥1 Case Reported

          B.1.1.7

          2,102

          45

          B.1.351

          49

          15

          P.1

          6

          5



          Emerging Variant Cases of B.1.1.7 in the United States


          More data.
          resize iconView Larger
          More Variants Data



          Testing


          The number of COVID-19 tests that come back positive (percent positivity) continues to decline. The 7-day average of percent positivity from RT-PCR tests is now 5.2%. Four states or territories remain at 10% positivity or higher. The 7-day average test volume for February 12-18, 2021 was 1,066,213, down 20.2% from 1,335,763 the prior 7 days.

          327,903,802
          Total Tests Reported

          1,066,213
          7-Day Average Test

          5.2%
          7-Day Average
          % Positivity


          -14.5%
          Change in 7-Day
          % Positivity

          COVID-19 Viral (RT-PCR) Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory


          More data.
          resize iconView Larger
          More Testing Dataexternal icon



          Vaccinations


          The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14. As of February 25, 2021, 68.3 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 46.1 million people, or 13.9% of the U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 21.6 million people, or 6.5% of the U.S. population, have received two doses of vaccine. As of February 25, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 1.5 million, a 7.1% decrease from the previous week likely due to weather events.

          68,274,117
          Vaccines Administered

          46,074,392
          People who received 1 or more doses

          21,555,117
          People who received 2 doses

          Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


          7-Day moving average


          More data.
          resize iconView Larger
          More Vaccination Data



          New Hospital Admissions


          Hospital admissions of patients with confirmed COVID-19 decreased 61% from the national 7-day average peak of 16,536 admissions on January 9, 2021, to 6,431 admissions on February 23, 2021. The average number of daily admissions fell by 11.3%, compared to the previous week.

          6,562
          New Admissions

          6,431
          Current 7-Day Average

          1,775,508
          Total New Admissions

          7,250
          Prior 7-Day Average

          16,536
          Peak 7-Day Average

          -11.3%
          Change in 7-Day Average

          Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


          More data.external icon The most recent data in the vertical gray bar are provisional and should be interpreted with caution.
          resize iconView Larger
          More Hospital Dataexternal icon



          Deaths


          Tragically, this week the United States passed a total of 500,000 deaths since the start of the pandemic. Nationally, the number of COVID-19 deaths continue to fluctuate. As of February 24, 2021, a total of 503,587 COVID-19 deaths were reported. The current 7-day average of deaths is 2,047 deaths, a 23.8% decrease from the previous 7-day average of 2,687 daily deaths.

          2,407
          New Deaths Reported

          2,047
          Current 7-Day Average**

          503,587
          Total Deaths Reported

          2,687
          Prior 7-Day Average**

          3,373
          Peak of 7-day Average*

          -23.8%
          Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week



          *The most recent (highest) peak in the 7-day average of new cases (Jan 11, 2021).

          ** The seven-day average number of new deaths (excluding historical deaths reported in the past two weeks) decreased by 4.8% to 2,047 new deaths per day compared to the previous seven-day average of 2,150. In the current week, there were 0 historical deaths reported, and in the prior week, there were 3,763 historical deaths reported by the state of Ohio.

          Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

          7-Day moving average


          More data.
          resize iconView Larger
          More Death Data


          Recent Publications
          1. Science Brief: Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in K-12 schools
          2. Zimmerman KO, Akinboyo IC, Brookhart MA, et al. Incidence and secondary transmission of SARS-CoV-2 infections in schools.external icon Pediatrics 2021;e2020048090.
          3. Falk A, Benda A, Falk P, Steffen S, Wallace Z, H?eg TB. COVID-19 cases and transmission in 17 K–12 schools—Wood County, Wisconsin, August 31–November 29, 2020. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2021;70:136–40.

          Notes

          The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

          CDC’s website also provides new data views such as county-specific summaries (under “Your Community” in Data Tracker), vaccination trends (under “Your Community” in Data Tracker), and information on SARS-CoV-2 variants.
          homeCases, Data & Surveillance
          https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

          Comment


          • #50
            These reports are missing the California variant even though that variant is reportedly responsible for 50% of the COVID cases now. ???

            Comment


            • #51

              COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


              Updated Mar. 5, 2021
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              Interpretative Summary for March 5, 2021
              An Effective New Tool in the Toolbox


              Vaccines are critical tools for ending the COVID-19 pandemic, and we just got a new one. On February 28, CDC released an official recommendation to use Johnson & Johnson?s Janssen (J&J/Janssen) vaccine, which is safe and effective in preventing severe COVID-19 illness, hospitalization, and death. This vaccine is being distributed now. The J&J/Janssen vaccine protects against COVID-19 in one dose, not two, and can be stored at a standard refrigerator temperature instead of needing colder storage. These advantages can help the vaccine reach most communities and mobile sites, as the supply of vaccines increases.

              Vaccinations, wearing a well-fitted mask, and taking other precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19 can help end the pandemic. We need to use all tools in the toolbox, accelerate vaccination and ensure vaccines are distributed equitably, and learn from our initial successes.

              Use all tools in the toolbox. On February 27, 2021, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for the J&J/Janssen vaccine. On February 28, 2021, CDC?s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) issued an interim recommendation for use of the J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine in people 18 years of age and older for the prevention of COVID-19.1 This vaccine is the third COVID-19 vaccine authorized under an EUA for the prevention of COVID-19 in the United States. CDC?s COVID Data Tracker has begun providing data by type of vaccine, which will soon include the J&J/Janssen vaccine.

              Accelerate vaccination and ensure equity. Vaccination has continued to increase this week with 16.3% of the total population vaccinated with at least one dose (including 21.2% 18 years of age and older) as of March 4, 2021. CDC provides vaccination data by race and ethnicity, age, and sex. Continued efforts are needed at the national, state and local levels to monitor for and ensure equity in vaccine distribution and administration.

              Learn from our initial success. Cases in skilled nursing facilities, for example, have declined up to 80% from the peak in late December. As we enter spring, we need to stay focused on reducing spread in our communities. This means we need to continue to practice proven prevention strategies including wearing a well-fitted mask, staying six feet apart from people we don?t live with, avoiding gatherings, washing hands often, staying home when sick, and getting vaccinated when the vaccine is available to you.


              Reported Cases


              Beginning on January 11, the 7-day average of newly reported cases declined for 43 consecutive days. There was a brief increase between February 27 and March 1, 2021; and as of March 2, the 7-day average of new cases began to decline again. There has been an overall decline of 74.9% of the 7-day moving average since the highest 7-day average of 249,360 on January 11, 2021. On March 3, there was a 5.7% decrease in the 7-day average number of daily cases reported compared with the prior week, which provides an encouraging sign of continued progress. Even with these declines, the 65,424 cases reported on March 3 remains much higher than what was seen during the first peak in the pandemic on April 6, 2020 of 42,597 cases.

              65,424
              New Cases Reported

              62,555
              Current 7-Day Average**

              28,580,198
              Total Cases Reported

              66,306
              Prior 7-Day Average

              249,360
              Peak of 7-Day Average*

              -5.7%
              Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

              *Highest peak for 7-day average (January 11, 2021).

              ** The current 7-day average of new cases is impacted by a historical correction of 8,585 cases; 2,990, 1,840, and 1,641 historical cases were reported by Texas on February 27, March 1 and March 3, 2021, respectively; and Alabama reported a historical correction of 2,114 cases on March 3, 2021. The 7-day average number of new cases (excluding historical cases reported in the past two weeks) decreased by 7.5% to 61,329 new cases per day compared to the previous 7-day average of 66,306.

              Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

              7-Day moving average

              resize iconView Larger
              More Case Data



              SARS-CoV-2 Variants


              CDC is closely tracking variants of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Three variants of concern have been detected in the United States: B.1.1.7, B.1.351, and P.1. A total of 2,672 B.1.1.7 variant cases have been reported in 48 jurisdictions. Sixty-eight cases attributed to B.1.351 in 17 jurisdictions and 13 cases attributed to P.1 in seven states have also been detected in the United States. CDC and partners are increasing the numbers of specimens sequenced in laboratories around the country. The number of variants reported will likely increase as more specimens are sequenced and if the frequency of variants increases. Studies are underway to determine whether variants cause more severe illness or are likely to evade immunity brought on by prior illness or vaccination. CDC published two reports this week on variants. 2,3

              Variant

              Reported Cases in US

              Number of Jurisdictions with ?1 Case Reported

              B.1.1.7

              2,672

              48

              B.1.351

              68

              17

              P.1

              13

              7



              Emerging Variant Cases of B.1.1.7 in the United States

              resize iconView Larger
              More Variants Data and Maps



              Testing


              The percent of COVID-19 RT-PCR tests that are positive (percent positivity) continues to decline. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 4.5%. The 7-day average test volume for February 19-25, 2021 was 1,212,844, up 10.5% from 1,097,940 the prior 7 days.

              337,114,841
              Total Tests Reported

              1,212,844
              7-Day Average Test Volume

              4.5%
              7-Day Average
              % Positivity


              -13.4%
              Change in 7-Day
              % Positivity

              COVID-19 Viral (RT-PCR) Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

              resize iconView Larger
              More Testing Dataexternal icon



              Vaccinations


              The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14. As of March 4, 2021, 82.6 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 54.0 million people, or 16.3% of the U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 27.8 million people, or 8.4% of the U.S. population, have received two doses of vaccine. As of March 4, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 2.0 million, a 36% increase from the previous week. Data by type of vaccine, which will soon include the J&J/Janssen vaccine, is available on CDC?s COVID Data Tracker.

              82,572,848
              Vaccines Administered

              54,035,670
              People who received 1 or more doses

              27,795,980
              People who received 2 doses

              Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


              7-Day moving average

              resize iconView Larger
              More Vaccination Data



              New Hospital Admissions


              Hospital admissions of patients with confirmed COVID-19 decreased 67% from the national 7-day average peak of 16,540 admissions on January 9, 2021 to a 7-day average of 5,490 admissions on March 2, 2021. The average number of daily admissions fell by 14.8%, compared to the previous week.

              5,390
              New Admissions

              5,490
              Current 7-Day Average

              1,814,606
              Total New Admissions

              6,446
              Prior 7-Day Average

              16,540
              Peak 7-Day Average

              -14.8%
              Change in 7-Day Average

              Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


              The most recent data in the vertical gray bar are provisional and should be interpreted with caution.
              resize iconView Larger
              More Hospital Data



              Deaths


              In recent weeks, the number of COVID-19 deaths has fluctuated. However, there has been an overall decline of 43.1% of the 7-day moving average since January 13, 2021. As of March 3, 2021, a total of 517,224 COVID-19 deaths were reported. The current 7-day average of deaths is 1,921 deaths, a 6.7% decrease from the previous 7-day average of 2,060 daily deaths.

              1,947
              New Deaths Reported

              1,921
              Current 7-Day Average**

              517,224
              Total Deaths Reported

              2,060
              Prior 7-Day Average

              3,378
              Peak of 7-day Average*

              -6.7%
              change in the 7-Day Average Since the Prior Week




              *The most recent (highest) peak in the 7-day average of new deaths (Jan 11, 2021).

              **The current 7-day average of new deaths is impacted by a historical correction of 806 deaths reported by California on February 25, 2021. The 7-day average number of new deaths (excluding historical deaths reported in the past two weeks) decreased by 9.8% to 1,877 new deaths per day compared to the previous 7-day average of 2,060.

              Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

              7-Day moving average

              resize iconView Larger
              More Death Data


              Recent Publications
              1. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices? Interim Recommendation for Use of Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine ? United States, February 2021Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in K-12 schools
              2. First Identified Cases of SARS-CoV-2 Variant P.1 in the United States ? Minnesota, January 2021
              3. Travel from the United Kingdom to the United States by a Symptomatic Patient Infected with the SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 Variant ? Texas, January 2021

              Notes

              The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

              CDC?s website also provides new data views such as county-specific summaries (under ?Your Community? in Data Tracker), vaccination trends (under ?Your Community? in Data Tracker), and information on SARS-CoV-2 variants.

              https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

              Comment


              • #52

                COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review for March 12, 2021


                Updated Mar. 12, 2021
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                Interpretive Summary for March 12, 2021
                The Unequal Toll of the COVID-19 Pandemic


                The COVID-19 pandemic continues to deepen health disparities in our country. Long-standing inequalities have increased the risk for severe COVID-19 illnesses and death for many people. This both causes and continues disparities between racial and ethnic minority groups and non-Hispanic white people. Unequal health risks are the result of different conditions where people live, work, learn, play, and age?what we call social determinants of health.

                By improving race and ethnicity data collection and reporting, we continue to increase our understanding of health disparities related to COVID-19. This knowledge helps us create more equitable public health policies and prevention strategies. Using multiple sources, CDC data show that the risks for COVID-19 illness, hospitalization, and death differ by race and ethnicity.
                • American Indian and Alaska Native people were 3.7 times more likely than non-Hispanic white people to be hospitalized and 2.4 times more likely to die from COVID-19 infection.
                • Black or African American people were 2.9 times more likely than non-Hispanic white people to be hospitalized and 1.9 times more likely to die from COVID-19 infection.
                • Hispanic and Latino people were 3.1 times more likely than non-Hispanic white people to be hospitalized and 2.3 times more likely to die from COVID-19 infection.

                Among people under the age of 25, a study released this week found that COVID-19 case incidence disparities were higher among most racial and ethnic minority groups, particularly earlier in 2020. To track disparities, CDC provides race and ethnicity data for cases and deaths, and vaccinations. New dashboards on COVID Data Tracker display changes in the impact of the pandemic over time by race and ethnicity.

                Social determinants of health contribute to racial and ethnic minority groups being disproportionately affected by COVID-19. Discrimination, which includes racism and associated chronic stress, influences each of these social determinants as well. We all have a role to play and must work together to ensure that people have resources to maintain and manage their physical and mental health, including easy access to information, affordable testing, vaccinations, and medical care.


                Reported Cases


                From January 11 through February 26, the 7-day average of newly reported cases declined daily. From February 27 through March 1, 2021, the 7-day average increased daily; however, as of March 2, the 7-day average of new cases began to decline again. Since the highest 7-day average of 249,378 on January 11, 2021, the 7-day moving average decreased 78.1%. On March 10, there was a 11.2% decrease in the 7-day average number of daily cases reported compared with the prior week, which provides an encouraging sign of continued progress. Even with these declines, the 56,586 cases reported on March 10, 2021, is higher than the 42,597 cases reported during the first peak in the pandemic on April 6, 2020.

                Jurisdictions have submitted historical corrections in the past 2 weeks, which influence the 7-day moving averages and percent change of the 7-day moving averages. Thus, the table below represents the new cases (not historical), the current and previous 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average with these historical data excluded. These historical corrections are included in the total cases below.

                56,586
                New Cases Reported*

                54,639
                Current 7-Day Average**

                29,052,862
                Total Cases Reported

                61,538
                Prior 7-Day Average

                249,378
                Peak of 7-Day Average***

                -11.2%
                Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

                * New cases reported here may differ slightly from those on the COVID Data Tracker as new methods are being used to account for historical corrections.

                ** In the current week, 87,670 historical cases were excluded, and in the prior week, 8,585 historical cases were excluded.

                ***Highest peak for 7-day average (January 11, 2021).

                Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

                7-Day moving average

                resize iconView Larger
                More Case Data



                SARS-CoV-2 Variants


                CDC is closely tracking variants of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Three variants of concern have been detected in the United States: B.1.1.7, B.1.351, and P.1. A total of 3,701 B.1.1.7 variant cases have been reported in 50 jurisdictions. One hundred eight cases attributed to B.1.351 in 23 jurisdictions and 17 cases attributed to P.1 in 10 jurisdictions have also been detected in the United States. CDC and partners are increasing the numbers of specimens sequenced in laboratories around the country. The number of variants reported will likely increase as more specimens are sequenced and if the frequency of variants increases. Studies are underway to determine whether variants are more transmissible, cause more severe illness, or are likely to evade immunity brought on by prior illness or vaccination.

                Variant

                Reported Cases in US

                Number of Jurisdictions with ?1 Case Reported

                B.1.1.7

                3,701

                50

                B.1.351

                108

                23

                P.1

                17

                10



                Emerging Variant Cases of B.1.1.7 in the United States

                resize iconView Larger
                More Variants Data and Maps



                Testing


                The percent of COVID-19 RT-PCR tests that are positive (percent positivity) continues to decline. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 4.1%. The 7-day average test volume for March 5-March 11, 2021, was 1,201,691, down 2.7% from 1,235,406 for the prior 7 days.

                345,686,141
                Total Tests Reported

                1,201,691
                7-Day Average Test Volume

                4.1%
                7-Day Average
                % Positivity


                -11.1%
                Change in 7-Day
                % Positivity

                COVID-19 Viral (RT-PCR) Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

                resize iconView Larger
                More Testing Dataexternal icon



                Vaccinations


                The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14. As of March 10, 2021, 95.7 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 62.5 million people, or 18.8% of the U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 32.9 million people, or 9.9% of the U.S. population have been fully vaccinated.* As of March 10, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 2.2 million, an 8% increase from the previous week. Data by type of vaccine, which now includes the J&J/Janssen vaccine, are available on CDC?s COVID Data Tracker.

                95,721,290
                Vaccines Administered

                62,451,150
                People who received at least one dose

                32,904,161
                People who are fully vaccinated*

                *People who are fully vaccinated (formerly ?receiving 2 doses?) represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

                Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


                7-Day moving average

                resize iconView Larger
                More Vaccination Data



                New Hospital Admissions


                Hospital admissions of patients with confirmed COVID-19 decreased 70.4% from the national 7-day average peak of 16,540 admissions on January 9, 2021, to 4,889 admissions over the week ending March 9, 2021. The average number of daily admissions fell by 11%, compared to the previous week.

                5,035
                New Admissions

                4,889
                Current 7-Day Average

                1,848,853
                Total New Admissions

                5,494
                Prior 7-Day Average

                16,540
                Peak 7-Day Average

                -11%
                Change in 7-Day Average

                Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


                The most recent data in the vertical gray bar are provisional and should be interpreted with caution.
                resize iconView Larger
                More Hospital Data



                Deaths


                In recent weeks, the number of COVID-19 deaths has fluctuated. However, there has been an overall decline of 56.6% of the 7-day moving average since January 13, 2021. As of March 10, 2021, a total of 527,726 COVID-19 deaths were reported. The current 7-day average of deaths is 1,465, a 19.3% decrease from the previous 7-day average of 1,816 daily deaths.

                Jurisdictions have submitted several historical corrections in the past 2 weeks, which affect the 7-day moving averages and percent change of the 7-day moving averages. Thus, the table below represents the new deaths (not historical), the current and previous 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average with these historical data excluded. These historical corrections are included in the total deaths below.

                1,513
                New Deaths Reported*

                1,465
                Current 7-Day Average**

                527,726
                Total Deaths Reported

                1,816
                Prior 7-Day Average

                3,378
                Peak of 7-day Average***

                -19.3%
                change in the 7-Day Average Since the Prior Week




                * New deaths reported here may differ slightly from those on the COVID Data Tracker as new methods are being used to account for historical corrections.

                ** In the current week, there were 138 historical deaths excluded, and in the prior week, there were 806 historical deaths excluded.

                *** The highest peak in the 7-day average of new deaths (Jan 11, 2021).

                Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

                7-Day moving average

                resize iconView Larger
                More Death Data


                Recent Publications
                1. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in COVID-19 Incidence by Age, Sex, and Time Period Among Persons Aged <25 Years ? 16 U.S. Jurisdictions, January 1?December 31, 2020
                2. Health Equity Considerations and Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups | CDC

                Notes

                The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

                CDC?s website also provides new data views such as county-specific summaries (under ?Your Community? in Data Tracker), vaccination trends (under ?Your Community? in Data Tracker), and information on SARS-CoV-2 variants.

                Last Updated March 12, 2021

                https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019.../03122021.html

                Comment


                • #53

                  COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


                  Updated Mar. 19, 2021
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                  Interpretive Summary for March 19, 2021
                  Hindsight is 2020: A Year of Heartbreak and Hope


                  On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization first characterized COVID-19 as a pandemic. The toll of this disease, the continued loss of life around the world, and the burden in our nation are heartbreaking. In one year, we lost over half a million Americans to COVID-19. Our nation has also experienced separation from friends, family, and loved ones; food insecurity and financial burden; and an unprecedented mental health crisis.

                  After a year of this pandemic, many of us are feeling tired, lonely, and impatient. Still, through it all, there is determination; there are stories of giving and hope, of stamina and perseverance. It was a hard year, but the progress we?ve made has given us hope?
                  • Vaccines are available. Today, more than 1 in 5 Americans have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. Each day millions more people are being vaccinated, providing hope that we can soon gather with our friends and family safely. On March 12, 2021, we reached 100 million vaccine doses administered in just 88 days?thanks to three safe and effective vaccines that have been distributed throughout the United States. CDC recently released recommendations for fully vaccinated people as the first step in safely returning to normal activities.
                  • Schools across the nation are reopening. CDC released an operational strategy to help pave the way for students? return to the classroom and childcare guidelines to ensure the safety of our children. Safer communities mean safer schools.
                  • Testing is widespread. Since the beginning of the pandemic, more than 354 million RT-PCR tests to detect COVD-19 have been performed in the United States. This week, CDC released updated testing guidance to help healthcare providers and public health professionals use testing as a part of a comprehensive pandemic response strategy. Quickly identifying people infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 means they can get medical care and stay away from others, preventing the spread of COVID-19. If you think you may have COVID-19 now or may have had it in the past, learn more about the different types of COVID-19 tests and how to get tested.
                  • Hospitalizations and deaths are declining. Hospital admissions and deaths are on the decline. We have come a long way from where we were, but we still have much work to do. We must continue to follow proven prevention strategies, and get vaccinated when a vaccine is available to you. We are just starting to turn a corner and the data are moving in the right direction, but where this goes depends on whether we all do what we can to protect ourselves, our loved ones, and our communities.

                  Even when this crisis is over, we will still need a strong public health system. The COVID-19 pandemic illuminated long-standing inequalities in health among racial and ethnic minority groups; demonstrated the need for resilient, fast, and accurate data systems; and showed the essential role a robust, skilled, and diverse public health workforce plays in protecting Americans. We cannot build the public health infrastructure the nation needs overnight or in the middle of an emergency. We must work together over the months and years ahead to build on the foundations, partnerships, and innovations that we have created during this crisis. It is one way we can turn tragedy into lasting progress and improved health for all.


                  Reported Cases


                  Overall, COVID-19 cases have decreased for the past 9 weeks. The current 7-day moving average of new cases (53,200) decreased 78.7% compared with the highest peak on January 11, 2021, (249,389), and 20.9% compared with the second highest peak on July 23, 2020 (67,277). On March 17, there was a 3.0% decrease in the 7-day average number of daily cases reported compared with the prior week, which provides an encouraging sign of continued progress.

                  56,900
                  New Cases Reported*

                  53,200
                  Current 7-Day Average**

                  29,431,658
                  Total Cases Reported

                  54,825
                  Prior 7-Day Average

                  249,389
                  Peak of 7-Day Average***

                  -3.0%
                  Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

                  * New cases reported here may differ slightly from those on the COVID Data Tracker as new methods are being used to account for historical corrections.

                  ** In the current week, 4,007 historical cases were excluded, and in the prior week, 87,670 historical cases were excluded.

                  *** Highest peak for 7-day average (January 11, 2021).

                  Note: The table above excludes historical data from the new cases, the current and previous 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                  Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

                  7-Day moving average

                  resize iconView Larger
                  More Case Data



                  SARS-CoV-2 Variants


                  A total of 5,576 B.1.1.7 variant cases have been reported in 51 jurisdictions. One hundred eighty cases attributed to B.1.351 in 26 jurisdictions and 48 cases attributed to P.1 in 15 jurisdictions have also been detected in the United States. In addition, the B.1.427 and B.1.429 variants that were first identified in the United States in January 2021 are also being closely monitored. CDC and partners are increasing the numbers of specimens sequenced in laboratories around the country. Studies are underway to determine whether variants are more transmissible, cause more severe illness, or are likely to evade immunity brought on by prior illness or vaccination.

                  To better understand the significance of these emerging variants, CDC recently published a webpage describing how variants are classified. CDC also recently published a new Variant Proportions in the U.S. web page, which describes CDC characterization of the proportion of SARS-CoV-2 lineages circulating in the United States. Additionally, the page highlights the estimated proportion of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern in select states for which CDC has at least 300 genome sequences available from specimens collected during the 4-week period ending February 13, 2021.

                  Variant

                  Reported Cases in US

                  Number of Jurisdictions with ?1 Case Reported

                  B.1.1.7

                  5,576

                  51

                  B.1.351

                  180

                  26

                  P.1

                  48

                  15



                  Cases of Variants of Concern in the United States

                  resize iconView Larger
                  More Variants Data and Maps



                  Testing


                  The percent of COVID-19 RT-PCR tests that are positive (percent positivity) has increased slightly from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 4.2%. No states or territories have higher than 10% positivity. The 7-day average test volume for March 5-March 11, 2021, was 1,170,972, down 5.0% from 1,231,973 for the prior 7 days.

                  354,627,733
                  Total Tests Reported

                  1,170,972
                  7-Day Average Test Volume

                  4.2%
                  7-Day Average
                  % Positivity


                  +1.7%
                  Change in 7-Day
                  % Positivity

                  COVID-19 Viral (RT-PCR) Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

                  resize iconView Larger
                  More Testing Dataexternal icon



                  Vaccinations


                  The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14. As of March 18, 2021, 115.7 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 75.5 million people, or 22.7% of the U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 41.0 million people, or 12.3% of the U.S. population have been fully vaccinated*. As of March 18, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 2.5 million, a 12.1% increase from the previous week.

                  Recent COVID Data Tracker updates show the percent of the population 65 years and older who have been vaccinated, and breakdowns of vaccine delivery, administration, and series completion by type. As of March 18, 66.3% of people 65 years or older have received at least one dose of vaccine; 38.6% are fully vaccinated.

                  115,730,008
                  Vaccines Administered

                  75,495,716
                  People who received at least one dose

                  40,981,464
                  People who are fully vaccinated*

                  *People who are fully vaccinated (formerly ?receiving 2 doses?) represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

                  Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


                  7-Day moving average

                  resize iconView Larger
                  More Vaccination Data



                  New Hospital Admissions


                  Hospital admissions of patients with confirmed COVID-19 decreased 71.6% from the national 7-day average peak of 16,540 admissions on January 9, 2021, to 4,696 admissions over the week ending March 16, 2021. The average number of daily admissions fell by 4.2%, compared to the previous week.

                  4,927
                  New Admissions

                  4,696
                  Current 7-Day Average

                  1,881,819
                  Total New Admissions

                  4,902
                  Prior 7-Day Average


                  16,540
                  Peak 7-Day Average

                  -4.2%
                  Change in 7-Day Average

                  Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


                  The most recent data in the vertical gray bar are provisional and should be interpreted with caution.
                  resize iconView Larger
                  More Hospital Data



                  Deaths


                  In recent weeks, the number of COVID-19 deaths has declined. Overall, deaths have decreased for the past 9 weeks. The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (1,025) decreased 69.7% compared with the highest peak on January 13, 2021 (3,379), and 10.7% compared with the peak on August 1, 2020 (1,148). As of March 17, 2021, a total of 535,217 COVID-19 deaths were reported.

                  1,118
                  New Deaths Reported*

                  1,025
                  Current 7-Day Average**

                  535,217
                  Total Deaths Reported

                  1,476
                  Prior 7-Day Average

                  3,378
                  Peak of 7-day Average***

                  -30.6%
                  Change in the 7-Day Average Since the Prior Week




                  * New deaths reported here may differ slightly from those on the COVID Data Tracker as new methods are being used to account for historical corrections.

                  ** In the current week, there were 195 historical deaths excluded, and in the prior week, there were 138 historical deaths excluded.

                  *** The highest peak in the 7-day average of new deaths (Jan 11, 2021).

                  Note: The table above excludes historical data from the new deaths, the current and previous 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                  Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

                  7-Day moving average

                  resize iconView Larger
                  More Death Data


                  Recent Publications
                  1. Association of Children?s Mode of School Instruction with Child and Parent Experiences and Well-Being During the COVID-19 Pandemic ? COVID Experiences Survey, United States, October 8?November 13, 2020 | MMWR (cdc.gov)
                  2. COVID-19 Vaccine Second-Dose Completion and Interval Between First and Second Doses Among Vaccinated Persons ? United States, December 14, 2020?February 14, 2021
                  3. Effectiveness of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine Among Residents of Two Skilled Nursing Facilities Experiencing COVID-19 Outbreaks ? Connecticut, December 2020?February 2021
                  4. Low SARS-CoV-2 Transmission in Elementary Schools ? Salt Lake County, Utah, December 3, 2020?January 31, 2021
                  5. Minimal SARS-CoV-2 Transmission After Implementation of a Comprehensive Mitigation Strategy at a School ? New Jersey, August 20?November 27, 2020

                  Notes

                  The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.

                  CDC?s website also provides new data views such as county-specific summaries (under ?Your Community? in Data Tracker), vaccination trends (under ?Your Community? in Data Tracker), and information on SARS-CoV-2 variants.
                  homeCases, Data & Surveillance
                  https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

                  Comment


                  • #54

                    COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


                    Updated Mar. 26, 2021
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                    Interpretive Summary for March 26, 2021
                    Testing?testing?1,2,3


                    A robust and responsive laboratory testing system is essential to our success in stopping the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Testing is important to diagnose illness when someone has symptoms or has been exposed to COVID-19, and to track illness trends in communities. Expanded testing helps pandemic response efforts in the United States and informs individuals? actions to stop further spread.

                    CDC?s updated guidance on SARS-CoV-2 testing offers a comprehensive approach that helps prevent the spread of COVID-19. The new guidance explains reasons for testing, the impact of vaccination on testing, available tests used to detect COVID-19 infection, how to choose which test to use, and health equity issues related to testing. These recommendations can help health department staff, healthcare providers, school officials, and the public make informed decisions about COVID-19 testing as a critical component of our national testing strategy.

                    Last week, the U.S. Department of Education announcedexternal icon it would provide all states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia with $122 billion to support states to reopen K-12 schools safely and equitably expand opportunity for students who need it most. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services also recently announcedexternal icon $10 billion to support expanded COVID-19 testing in schools nationwide. Testing to diagnose COVID-19 in schools, together with universal and correct use of masks, physical distancing, handwashing, and cleaning and maintaining healthy facilities, can help schools protect students and their families, teachers and staff, and the broader community by slowing the spread of COVID-19 while returning to in-person learning safely.

                    CDC is also investing $2.25 billion to address COVID-19 health disparities and advance health equity among people who are underserved or at higher risk of exposure, infection, hospitalization, and mortality, including racial and ethnic minority groups and people living in rural areas. To help track disparities, COVID-NET Hospitalization Surveillance Network data now allows COVID Data Tracker users to view COVID-19-associated hospitalizations by race/ethnicity over time. Ending this pandemic requires that everyone has equal access to affordable and timely testing, treatment, and vaccination.


                    Reported Cases


                    Overall, COVID-19 cases have decreased for the past 10 weeks, although we have seen consistent increases in the 7-day average of new cases over the past few days. The current 7-day moving average of new cases (56,995) decreased 77.2% compared with the highest peak on January 11, 2021 (250,400), and 15.4% compared with the second highest peak on July 23, 2020 (67,337). On March 24, there was a 6.7% increase in the 7-day average number of daily cases reported compared with the prior week.

                    64,397
                    New Cases Reported*

                    56,995
                    Current 7-Day Average**

                    29,834,734
                    Total Cases Reported

                    53,433
                    Prior 7-Day Average

                    250,400
                    Peak of 7-Day Average***

                    +6.7%
                    Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

                    *New cases and 7-day averages reported here may differ slightly from those on the COVID Data Tracker as we continue to incorporate jurisdictions? updates to their historical data.

                    ** In the current week, 1,775 historical cases were excluded, and in the prior week, 4,007 historical cases were excluded.

                    ***Highest peak for 7-day average (January 11, 2021).

                    Note: The table above excludes historical data from the new cases, the current and previous 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                    Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

                    7-Day moving average

                    resize iconView Larger
                    More Case Data



                    SARS-CoV-2 Variants


                    CDC recently published a Variant Proportions in the U.S. web page, which describes how CDC characterizes the proportion of SARS-CoV-2 lineages circulating in the United States. This page also highlights the estimated proportion of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern in select states for which CDC has at least 300 genome sequences available from specimens collected during the 4-week period ending February 27, 2021.

                    This is updated every Wednesday, and additional work is underway to produce model-based estimates of the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 variants. These model-based estimates will be reported on the COVID Data Tracker soon.

                    As of March 25, a total of 8,337 B.1.1.7 variant cases have been reported in 51 jurisdictions. Also, 266 cases attributed to B.1.351 in 29 jurisdictions and 79 cases attributed to P.1 in 19 jurisdictions have been reported in the United States. In addition, the B.1.427 and B.1.429 variants that were first identified in the United States in January 2021 are also being closely monitored. CDC and partners are increasing the numbers of specimens sequenced in laboratories around the country. Studies are underway to determine whether variants are more transmissible, cause more severe illness, or are likely to evade immunity brought on by prior illness or vaccination.

                    Variant

                    Reported Cases in US

                    Number of Jurisdictions with ?1 Case Reported

                    B.1.1.7

                    8,337

                    51

                    B.1.351

                    266

                    29

                    P.1

                    79

                    19



                    SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

                    resize iconView Larger
                    More Variants Data



                    Testing


                    The percent of COVID-19 RT-PCR tests that are positive (percent positivity) has increased slightly from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 4.7%. The 7-day average test volume for March 19-March 25, 2021, was 1,079,735, down 9.9% from 1,199,024 for the prior 7 days.

                    363,143,628
                    Total Tests Reported

                    1,079,735
                    7-Day Average Test Volume

                    4.7%
                    7-Day Average
                    % Positivity


                    +9.4%
                    Change in 7-Day
                    % Positivity

                    COVID-19 Viral (RT-PCR) Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

                    resize iconView Larger
                    More Testing Dataexternal icon



                    Vaccinations


                    The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14. As of March 24, 2021, 130.5 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 85.5 million people, or 25.7% of the U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 46.4 million people, or 14.0% of the U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated*. As of March 24, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 2.5 million, a 0.7% increase from the previous week.

                    Recent COVID Data Tracker updates show the percent of the population 65 years and older who have been vaccinated, and breakdowns of vaccine delivery, administration, and series completion by type. As of March 24, 70.3% of people 65 years or older have received at least one dose of vaccine; 43.8% are fully vaccinated.

                    130,473,853
                    Vaccines Administered

                    85,472,166
                    People who received at least one dose

                    46,365,515
                    People who are fully vaccinated*

                    *People who are fully vaccinated (formerly ?receiving 2 doses?) represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

                    Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


                    7-Day moving average

                    resize iconView Larger
                    More Vaccination Data



                    New Hospital Admissions


                    Hospital admissions of patients with confirmed COVID-19 decreased 71.5% from the national 7-day average peak of 16,540 admissions on January 9, 2021, to an average of 4,714 admissions over the 7-day period ending March 23, 2021. The average number of daily admissions increased by 0.1% compared to the previous week.

                    5,165
                    New Admissions

                    4,714
                    Current 7-Day Average

                    1,914,903
                    Total New Admissions

                    4,707
                    Prior 7-Day Average


                    16,540
                    Peak 7-Day Average

                    +0.1%
                    Change in 7-Day Average

                    Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


                    The most recent data in the vertical gray bar are provisional and should be interpreted with caution.
                    resize iconView Larger
                    More Hospital Data



                    Trends in Hospitalizations among Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups


                    Long-standing inequalities have increased the risk for severe COVID-19 illnesses and death for many people in racial and ethnic minority groups. By improving race and ethnicity data collection and reporting, we continue to increase our understanding of health disparities related to COVID-19. This knowledge helps us create more equitable public health policies and prevention strategies.

                    COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates have decreased in all races and ethnicities after peaking in early January. Rates for American Indian and Alaska Native persons have dropped by more than 50% from a peak of 46.9 per 100,000 in November to less than 15 per 100,000 in recent weeks. Similar declines of more than 50% have been seen for other race and ethnicity groups; as well, hospitalizations have decreased from their highest point in early January 2021.

                    Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization

                    resize iconView Larger
                    The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.
                    More COVID-NET Data



                    Deaths


                    The number of COVID-19 deaths has continued to decline, a trend we observed over the past 10 weeks. The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (946) decreased 72.0% compared with the highest peak on January 13, 2021 (3,379), and 17.5% compared with the peak on August 1, 2020 (1,148). As of March 24, 2021, a total of 542,584 COVID-19 deaths were reported.

                    1,262
                    New Deaths Reported*

                    946
                    Current 7-Day Average**

                    542,584
                    Total Deaths Reported

                    1,031
                    Prior 7-Day Average

                    3,379
                    Peak of 7-day Average***

                    -8.2%
                    Change in the 7-Day Average Since the Prior Week




                    *New cases and 7-day averages reported here may differ slightly from those on the COVID Data Tracker as we continue to incorporate jurisdictions? updates to their historical data.

                    ** In the current week, there were 655 historical deaths excluded, and in the prior week, there were 195 historical deaths excluded.

                    *** The highest peak in the 7-day average of new deaths (Jan 13, 2021).

                    Note: The table above excludes historical data from the new deaths, the current and previous 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                    Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

                    7-Day moving average

                    resize iconView Larger
                    More Death Data


                    Recent Publications
                    1. Counties with High COVID-19 Incidence and Relatively Large Racial and Ethnic Minority Populations ? United States, April 1?December 22, 2020
                    2. County-Level COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage and Social Vulnerability ? United States, December 14, 2020?March 1, 2021
                    3. COVID-19 in Primary and Secondary School Settings During the First Semester of School Reopening ? Florida, August?December 2020
                    4. Pilot Investigation of SARS-CoV-2 Secondary Transmission in Kindergarten Through Grade 12 Schools Implementing Mitigation Strategies ? St. Louis County and City of Springfield, Missouri, December 2020
                    Recent COVID Data Tracker Updates
                    • The enhanced Community Characteristics table on the County View tab classifies counties according to their urban/rural status and provides county, state and US estimates for each characteristic for comparison.
                    • New COVID-NET Hospitalization Surveillance Network tab in the Health Care Settings Data section allows users to view COVID-19-associated hospitalizations by age, sex, race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, and more, over time.
                    • New About Health Care Setting Data page describes the various health care setting data streams displayed.
                    • New dashboards on COVID Data Tracker display changes in the impact of the pandemic over time. This feature includes interactive visualizations that allow users to see changes in the impact of the pandemic over time by race and ethnicity.
                    • The COVID-19 Vaccinations in the US and the COVID-19 Vaccinations in Long-Term Care Facilities pages now include the Johnson & Johnson Janssen vaccine. Additional updates to the COVID-19 Vaccinations in the US page show the percent of the population 65 years and older who have been vaccinated, and the breakdown of vaccine delivery, administration, and series completion by vaccination manufacturer type.
                    homeMore Resourceshttps://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

                    Comment


                    • #55

                      COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


                      Updated Apr. 2, 2021
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                      Interpretive Summary for April 2, 2021
                      The Race to Vaccinate


                      The United States recently administered a record 3.38 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine in a single day. As of April 1, 2021, nearly 154 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in the United States, with over 56 million people having been fully vaccinated. We now have three historic, safe, and effective vaccines being administered across the country at a rapid pace, and more vaccines are in the works. A new CDC study shows that COVID-19 vaccines are effective at preventing COVID-19 infections and serious COVID-19 illness. Once fully vaccinated, a person?s risk of infection is reduced by up to 90%.

                      However, we are also seeing an increase in COVID-19 cases, including cases from new and emerging COVID-19 variants of concern. These variants of concern are mutated versions of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and have the potential to cause COVID-19 to be more severe, spread more easily between humans, require different treatments, or change the effectiveness of current vaccines.

                      Scientists continue to learn how the vaccines protect people from variants. Until most of the U.S. population is fully vaccinated, consistent use of public health prevention strategies, such as universal and correct use of masks, social distancing, hand washing, and vaccination, will help to limit the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Even if you have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, you should keep taking these everyday precautions in public places.

                      The race to vaccinate people and contain the virus is underway. The actions we take today determine how long it will take to stop the virus and end the pandemic.


                      Reported Cases


                      COVID-19 cases were steadily decreasing for approximately 10 weeks; however, trends are changing, and cases have increased during the past 12 days. The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (62,167) increased 8.4% compared with the previous 7 days. Compared with previous peaks, however, the 7-day average decreased 75.2% compared with the highest peak on January 11, 2021 (250,446), and 7.7% compared with the second highest peak on July 23, 2020 (67,337).

                      64,149
                      New Cases Reported*

                      62,167
                      Current 7-Day Average**

                      30,277,908
                      Total Cases Reported

                      57,343
                      Prior 7-Day Average

                      250,446
                      Peak of 7-Day Average***

                      +8.4%
                      Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

                      *New cases and 7-day averages reported here may differ slightly from those on the COVID Data Tracker as we continue to incorporate jurisdictions? updates to their historical data.

                      **Historical cases are excluded from 7-day average calculations. Of 22,178 historical cases reported retroactively, 4,451 were reported in the current week, and 1,775 in the prior week.

                      ***Highest peak for 7-day average (January 11, 2021).

                      Note: The table above excludes historical data from the new cases, the current and previous 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                      Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

                      7-Day moving average

                      resize iconView Larger
                      More Case Data



                      SARS-CoV-2 Variants


                      CDC recently updated the Variant Proportions in the U.S. web page to include the most recent proportions of SARS-CoV-2 variants nationally and in states where there is enough data for CDC to monitor variants. Also, a new Variant Surveillance Section of the COVID Data Tracker was recently published with sequencing data and the global variant report map by country.

                      As of April 1, 2021, 12,505 B.1.1.7 variant cases have been reported in 51 jurisdictions. The United States has detected a total of 323 cases attributed to B.1.351 in 31 jurisdictions and 224 cases attributed to P.1 in 22 jurisdictions. In addition, we are closely monitoring the B.1.427 and B.1.429 variants that were first identified in the United States in January 2021. CDC and partners are increasing the numbers of specimens sequenced in laboratories around the country. Studies are underway to determine whether variants are more transmissible, cause more severe illness, or are likely to evade immunity brought on by prior illness or vaccination.

                      Variant

                      Reported Cases in US

                      Number of Jurisdictions with ?1 Case Reported

                      B.1.1.7

                      12,505

                      51

                      B.1.351

                      323

                      31

                      P.1

                      224

                      22



                      SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

                      resize iconView Larger
                      More Variants Data



                      Testing


                      The percentage of COVID-19 RT-PCR tests that are positive (percent positivity) has increased slightly from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 5.1%. The 7-day average test volume for March 19-March 25, 2021, was 1,162,774, down 1.5% from 1,180,332 for the prior 7 days.

                      375,521,522
                      Total Tests Reported

                      1,162,774
                      7-Day Average Test Volume

                      5.1%
                      7-Day Average
                      % Positivity


                      +13.0%
                      Change in 7-Day
                      % Positivity

                      COVID-19 Viral (RT-PCR) Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

                      resize iconView Larger
                      More Testing Dataexternal icon



                      Vaccinations


                      The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14. As of April 1, 2021, 153.6 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 99.6 million people, or 30% of the U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 56.1 million people, or 16.9% of the U.S. population have been fully vaccinated.* As of April 1, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 2.9 million, a 15.7% increase from the previous week.

                      The new COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of April 1, 73.7% of people 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine; 52% are fully vaccinated. More than one-third (38.4%) of people 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine; 21.7% are fully vaccinated.

                      153,631,404
                      Vaccines Administered

                      99,565,311
                      People who received at least one dose

                      56,089,614
                      People who are fully vaccinated*

                      30%
                      Percentage of the U.S. population that has received at least 1 dose

                      16.9%
                      Percentage of the U.S. population that has been fully vaccinated*

                      *People who are fully vaccinated (formerly ?receiving 2 doses?) represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

                      Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


                      7-Day moving average

                      resize iconView Larger
                      More Vaccination Data



                      New Hospital Admissions


                      Hospital admissions of patients with confirmed COVID-19 decreased by 70.1% from the national 7-day average peak of 16,522 admissions on January 9, 2021, to an average of 4,948 admissions over the 7-day period ending March 30, 2021. This, however, is a 4.8% increase from the previous 7-day period.

                      5,261
                      New Admissions

                      4,948
                      Current 7-Day Average

                      1,947,825
                      Total New Admissions

                      4,722
                      Prior 7-Day Average


                      16,522
                      Peak 7-Day Average

                      +4.8%
                      Change in 7-Day Average

                      Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


                      The most recent data in the vertical gray bar are provisional and should be interpreted with caution.
                      resize iconView Larger
                      More Hospital Data



                      Trends in Hospitalizations among Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups


                      Long-standing systemic health and social inequities have increased the risk for severe COVID-19 illnesses and death for many people in racial and ethnic minority groups. By improving race and ethnicity data collection and reporting, we continue to increase our understanding of health disparities related to COVID-19. This knowledge helps us create more equitable public health policies and prevention strategies.

                      COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates have decreased in all races and ethnicities after peaking in early January. Rates for American Indian and Alaska Native persons have dropped from a peak of 47.4 per 100,000 in November to less than 10 per 100,000 in recent weeks. Declines of more than 50% have been seen for other race and ethnicity groups. In addition, hospitalizations have decreased from their highest point in early January 2021.

                      Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization

                      resize iconView Larger
                      The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.
                      More COVID-NET Data



                      Deaths


                      Except for an increase during March 27-28, 2021, overall, deaths have decreased for the past 11 weeks. On March 31, the 7-day average of daily new deaths decreased 7.7% compared with the prior 7 days (although the absolute number of deaths increased compared to the previous day). Compared with prior peaks, the current 7-day moving average of 880 daily new deaths decreased 74.0% compared with the highest peak on January 13, 2021 (3,379 deaths), and 23.3% compared with the peak on August 1, 2020 (1,148 deaths). As of March 31, 2021, a total of 549,098 COVID-19 deaths have been reported.

                      917
                      New Deaths Reported*

                      880
                      Current 7-Day Average**

                      549,098
                      Total Deaths Reported

                      953
                      Prior 7-Day Average

                      3,379
                      Peak of 7-day Average***

                      -7.7%
                      Change in the 7-Day Average Since the Prior Week




                      *New cases and 7-day averages reported here may differ slightly from those on the COVID Data Tracker as we continue to incorporate jurisdictions? updates to their historical data.

                      ** Of 13,233 historical deaths reported retroactively, 19 were reported on March 31, 2021; 286 were reported in the current week; and 655 in the prior week.

                      *** The highest peak in the 7-day average of new deaths (Jan 13, 2021).

                      Note: The table above excludes historical data from the new deaths, the current and previous 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                      Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

                      7-Day moving average

                      resize iconView Larger
                      More Death Data


                      Recent Publications
                      1. Death Certificate?Based ICD-10 Diagnosis Codes for COVID-19 Mortality Surveillance ? United States, January?December 2020
                      2. Interim Estimates of Vaccine Effectiveness of BNT162b2 and mRNA-1273 COVID-19 Vaccines in Preventing SARS-CoV-2 Infection Among Health Care Personnel, First Responders, and Other Essential and Frontline Workers ? Eight U.S. Locations, December 2020?March 2021
                      3. Provisional Mortality Data ? United States, 2020
                      Recent COVID Data Tracker Updates
                      • New county-level vaccination data on the County View tab allow users to view and download data at the county level, including percent of total population fully vaccinated, percent of the population ?18 years of age fully vaccinated, and percent of the population ?65 years of age fully vaccinated.
                      • New Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group.
                      • New Genomic Surveillance section of COVID Data Tracker tracks published COVID-19 genomic sequences and the global variant report map by country.
                      • New COVID-NET Hospitalization Surveillance Network tab in the Health Care Settings Data section allows users to view COVID-19-associated hospitalizations by age, sex, race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, and more, over time.



                      homeMore Resourceshttps://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

                      Comment


                      • #56

                        COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


                        Updated Apr. 9, 2021
                        Print



                        Interpretive Summary for April 9, 2021
                        Vigilance Matters When Viruses Vary


                        The United States is in the fourth week of an upward trend in COVID-19 cases. The lifting of social distancing and mask mandates in some areas could be contributing to this increase. This increase could also be due to the presence of more contagious variants of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, which is why it is important to remain vigilant.

                        Viruses change constantly through mutation, so new variants are expected to occur as the virus spreads. Some variants pose a bigger threat than others. B.1.1.7 is the most common variant circulating in the United States and has been reported in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Understanding variants and their spread will help us contain the virus.

                        CDC recently introduced a classification system to rank the risk of the variants that we are monitoring, similar to the way the weather service ranks hurricanes. The classification system characterizes emerging variants based on their characteristics and the resulting actions and consequences for public health. CDC?s three classification categories include Variants of Interest (VOI), Variants of Concern (VOC) and Variants of High Consequence (VOHC). CDC is currently monitoring five variants of concern in the United States; none of the variants circulating in the United States are classified as variants of high consequence. Many of the variants circulating in the United States do not fall into one of these categories, but CDC continues to monitor them.
                        Yes Yes Yes
                        Yes Yes Yes
                        Yes Yes Yes
                        No Yes Yes
                        No Yes Yes
                        No Yes Yes
                        No Yes Yes
                        No No Yes
                        No No Yes
                        No No Yes
                        Variants may have one or more of the listed attributes

                        *none at this time

                        The best way to slow the emergence of new variants is to slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing a mask that covers your nose and mouth, staying 6 feet away from people who don?t live with you, avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated indoor spaces, and getting a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as it is available to you.


                        Reported Cases


                        Since March 20, 2021, the 7-day moving average of new cases has consistently remained higher compared with the previous 7-day moving average. The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (64,152) increased 2.0% compared with the previous 7-day moving average. However, the 7-day average decreased 74.3% compared with the highest peak on January 8, 2021 (249,697), and 4.7% compared with the second highest peak on July 23, 2020 (67,348). A total of 30,737,477 COVID-19 cases were reported as of April 7, 2021, including 74,860 new cases.

                        74,860
                        New Cases Reported

                        64,152
                        Current 7-Day Average*

                        30,737,477
                        Total Cases Reported

                        62,869
                        Prior 7-Day Average

                        249,697
                        Peak of 7-Day Average**

                        +2.0%
                        Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

                        *Historical cases are excluded from 7-day average calculations. Of 24,809 historical cases reported retroactively, 2,631 were reported in the current week, and 4,451 were reported in the prior week.

                        **Highest peak for 7-day average (January 8, 2021).

                        Note: The table above excludes historical data from the new cases, the current and previous 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                        Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

                        7-Day moving average

                        resize iconView Larger
                        More Case Data



                        SARS-CoV-2 Variants


                        CDC recently updated the COVID Data Tracker to include the most recent proportions of SARS-CoV-2 variants nationally and in states where there is enough data for CDC to monitor variants. The Variant Surveillance section of the COVID Data Tracker provides an overview of published sequencing data and a global variant report map by country.

                        To provide a better picture of how widespread specific variants are in the US, CDC analyzes available genomic sequence data from specimens of SARS-CoV-2 collected from patients. This data is weighted to account for known differences in diagnostic testing and sequencing across time and geography. Based on the currently available data from early March, an estimated 27.2% of COVID-19 cases in the United States are caused by the SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.7. The proportion of cases caused by B.1.429 is estimated at 9.1% and the proportion of cases caused by B.1.427 is estimated at 4.3%. Variants P.1 and B.1.351 are both estimated to be 0.5% of the current COVID-19 cases.

                        CDC and partners are increasing the numbers of specimens sequenced in laboratories around the country. Studies are underway to determine whether variants are more transmissible, cause more severe illness, or are likely to evade immunity brought on by prior illness or vaccination.

                        US COVID-19 Cases Caused by Variants

                        Variant

                        Reported Cases in US

                        Number of Jurisdictions with ?1 Case Reported

                        B.1.1.7

                        19,554

                        52

                        B.1.351

                        424

                        36

                        P.1

                        434

                        28



                        SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

                        resize iconView Larger
                        More Variants Data



                        Testing


                        The percentage of COVID-19 RT-PCR tests that are positive (percent positivity) has increased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 5.5%. The 7-day average test volume for March 26?April 1, 2021, was 1,172,235, down 2.2% from 1,198,428 for the prior 7 days.

                        384,580,206
                        Total Tests Reported

                        1,172,235
                        7-Day Average Test Volume

                        5.5%
                        7-Day Average
                        % Positivity


                        +8.7%
                        Change in 7-Day
                        % Positivity

                        COVID-19 Viral (RT-PCR) Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

                        resize iconView Larger
                        More Testing Dataexternal icon



                        Vaccinations


                        The US COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14. As of April 8, 2021, 174.9 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 112.0 million people, or 33.7% of the US population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 66.2 million people, or 19.9% of the US population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of April 8, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 3.0 million, a 4.5% increase from the previous week.

                        The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of April 8, 76.9% of people 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine; 58.4% are fully vaccinated. More than one-third (43.2%) of people 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine; 25.6% are fully vaccinated.

                        174,879,716
                        Vaccines Administered

                        112,046,611
                        People who received at least one dose

                        66,203,123
                        People who are fully vaccinated*

                        33.7%
                        Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

                        19.9%
                        Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

                        +3.7
                        percentage point increase from last week

                        +3.0
                        percentage point increase from last week

                        *People who are fully vaccinated (formerly ?receiving 2 doses?) represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

                        Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


                        7-Day moving average

                        resize iconView Larger
                        More Vaccination Data



                        New Hospital Admissions


                        Hospital admissions of patients with confirmed COVID-19 decreased by 67.7% from the national 7-day average peak of 16,521 admissions on January 9, 2021, to an average of 5,336 admissions over the 7-day period ending April 06, 2021. This however is a 7.3% increase from the previous 7-day period (March 24?30, 2021).

                        6,583
                        New Admissions

                        5,336
                        Current 7-Day Average

                        1,985,128
                        Total New Admissions

                        4,974
                        Prior 7-Day Average


                        16,521
                        Peak 7-Day Average*

                        +7.3%
                        Change in 7-Day Average



                        *Highest peak for 7-day average (January 9, 2021).

                        Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States


                        The most recent data in the vertical gray bar are provisional and should be interpreted with caution.
                        resize iconView Larger
                        More Hospital Data



                        Trends in Hospitalizations by Age Group


                        Older adults are at increased risk for severe COVID-19 illness, including an increased risk for hospitalization. Since the start of the pandemic, adults aged 65 years and older were the age group with the highest rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalization. While rates of hospitalization have fallen for all age groups since the peak in early January 2021, the rates for these older adults have fallen the most. Rates of hospitalization in adults aged 65 years and older have decreased by more than 70% in the past two months, from 70.2 per 100,000 in early January to less than 20 per 100,000 in recent weeks. However, rates have plateaued or risen in recent weeks in all age groups.

                        Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations

                        resize iconView Larger
                        The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.
                        More COVID-NET Data



                        Deaths


                        Overall, the 7-day moving average of daily new deaths has generally decreased for the past 12 weeks. On April 7, the 7-day average of daily new deaths (711) decreased 20.6% compared with the prior 7-day average; decreased 79.2% compared with the highest peak on January 13, 2021 (3,409); and decreased 38.2% compared with the peak on August 1, 2020 (1,151). As of April 7, 2021, a total of 556,106 COVID-19 deaths have been reported, including 871 new deaths.

                        871
                        New Deaths Reported

                        711
                        Current 7-Day Average*

                        556,106
                        Total Deaths Reported

                        895
                        Prior 7-Day Average

                        3,409
                        Peak of 7-day Average**

                        -20.6%
                        Change in the 7-Day Average Since the Prior Week




                        *Of 13,386 historical deaths reported retroactively, 153 were reported in the current week, and 286 were reported in the prior week.

                        ** The highest peak in the 7-day average of new deaths (Jan 13, 2021).

                        Note: The table above excludes historical data from the new deaths, the current and previous 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                        Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

                        7-Day moving average

                        resize iconView Larger
                        More Death Data


                        Recent CDC COVID-19 Publications
                        1. Community Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 Associated with a Local Bar Opening Event ? Illinois, February 2021
                        2. Factors Associated with Participation in Elementary School?Based SARS-CoV-2 Testing ? Salt Lake County, Utah, December 2020?January 2021
                        Recent COVID Data Tracker Updates
                        https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


                          Updated Apr. 23, 2021
                          Print
                          Subscribe to the Weekly Review


                          Interpretive Summary for April 23, 2021
                          Have You Heard? We?re at One-Third!


                          As of April 22, 2021, one in three people in the United States over the age of 18 years are fully vaccinated and more than half of U.S. adults have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Widespread vaccination is a critical tool to help stop the pandemic. A recent CDC study shows that, once fully vaccinated, a person?s risk of infection is reduced by up to 90%.* The efficacy seen in clinical trials is now being shown in the real world. Current data also suggest that COVID-19 vaccines offer protection against the variants circulating in the United States.

                          Some people who are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 may still get sick because no vaccine is 100% effective. Last week, CDC released data on the number of ?breakthrough? infections of people who, despite being vaccinated, still tested positive for COVID-19 more than 14 days after getting their second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. However, as of last week, there were fewer than 6,000 ?breakthrough? infections reported, which represents less than 1% of people who have been fully vaccinated. Of these, approximately 30% had no symptoms at all. Two recent CDC reports1,2 show that COVID-19 vaccines help protect people who are vaccinated from getting COVID-19 and may reduce severity of illness among people who get vaccinated but still get COVID-19.

                          Getting a vaccine will help protect you, help protect others, and help end the pandemic. More vaccinations equals fewer infections and fewer variants. Previously, certain groups were prioritized for COVID-19 vaccination. Now, all people in the United States age 16 and older are eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine. Vaccines are free and increasingly available. To find a vaccination provider near you, visit Vaccine Finderexternal icon or your state or local public health department website.

                          * A recent CDC study provides strong evidence that mRNA COVID-19 vaccines, which include the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, are highly effective in preventing SARS-CoV-2 infections in real-world conditions. The study found that ?partial? vaccination (two weeks after a single dose) with either a Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine reduced the risk of infection by 80%. ?Full? vaccination (two weeks after the second dose) reduced risk of infection by 90%. Last week the FDAexternal icon and CDC recommended a pause in the use of the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen (J&J) vaccine to review data involving six reported U.S. cases of a rare and severe type of blood clot in individuals after receiving the J&J vaccine. These cases are rare and were identified through CDC?s vaccine safety monitoring system. The events of last week serve as a reminder that safety is a top priority.


                          Reported Cases


                          The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (62,596) decreased 10.1% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (69,614). Compared with the highest peak on January 8, 2021 (249,436), the current 7-day average decreased 74.9%. A total of 31,666,546 COVID-19 cases were reported as of April 21, 2021, including 62,827 new cases.

                          62,827
                          New Cases Reported

                          62,596
                          Current 7-Day Average*

                          31,666,546
                          Total Cases Reported

                          69,614
                          Prior 7-Day Average

                          249,436
                          Peak of 7-Day Average**

                          -10.1%
                          Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

                          *Historical cases are excluded from 7-day average calculations. Of 89,900 historical cases reported retroactively (with missing report dates), 5,434 were reported in the current week, and 6,301 were reported in the prior week.

                          **Highest peak for 7-day average (January 8, 2021).

                          Note: The table above excludes historical data with missing report dates from the new cases, the current and previous 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                          Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

                          7-Day moving average

                          resize iconView Larger
                          More Case Data



                          SARS-CoV-2 Variants


                          Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally and within the United States. Based on specimens collected from March 14 to March 27, an estimated 44.7% of COVID-19 cases in the United States are caused by the SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.7. The proportion of cases caused by B.1.429 is estimated at 6.9%, and the proportion of cases caused by B.1.427 is estimated at 3.1%. Variant P.1 is estimated to comprise 1.5% of COVID-19 cases, and the proportion of B.1.351 cases is estimated to be 0.7% for the end of March. Proportion estimates provided in COVID Data Tracker can now be viewed at the national or regional level in 2-week intervals.

                          CDC and partners are increasing the numbers of specimens sequenced in laboratories around the country. For the week ending April 17, over 31,000 sequences were published in public repositories through CDC sequencing efforts. Studies are underway to determine whether variants are more transmissible, cause more severe illness, or are likely to evade immunity brought on by prior illness or vaccination.

                          Note: To paint a clearer picture of how prevalent specific variants are in the United States, CDC analyzes available genomic sequence data from specimens of SARS-CoV-2 collected from patients. These data are weighted to account for known differences in diagnostic testing and sequencing across time and geography.

                          SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

                          resize iconView Larger

                          resize iconView Larger
                          More Variants Data



                          Testing


                          The percentage of COVID-19 RT-PCR tests that are positive (percent positivity) has decreased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 5.2%. The 7-day average test volume for April 9-April 15, 2021, was 1,189,820, up 1.6% from 1,170,968 for the prior 7 days.

                          404,035,737
                          Total Tests Reported

                          1,189,820
                          7-Day Average Test Volume

                          5.2%
                          7-Day Average
                          % Positivity


                          -5.4%
                          Change in 7-Day
                          % Positivity

                          COVID-19 Viral (RT-PCR) Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

                          resize iconView Larger
                          More Testing Dataexternal icon



                          Vaccinations


                          The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of April 22, 2021, 218.9 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 135.8 million people, or 40.9% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 89.2 million people, or 26.9% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of April 22, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 2.9 million, a 12% decrease from the previous week.

                          The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of April 22, 80.7% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 66% are fully vaccinated. Just over one-half (52%) of people ages 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 34.4% are fully vaccinated.

                          218,947,643
                          Vaccines Administered

                          135,791,031
                          People who received at least one dose

                          89,245,776
                          People who are fully vaccinated*

                          40.9%
                          Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

                          26.9%
                          Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

                          +3.0
                          percentage point increase from last week

                          +3.3
                          percentage point increase from last week

                          *People who are fully vaccinated (formerly ?receiving 2 doses?) represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

                          Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


                          7-Day moving average

                          resize iconView Larger
                          More Vaccination Data



                          Hospitalizations

                          New Hospital Admissions


                          New admissions have decreased considerably since their January peaks. However, since March 22, 2021, the 7-day moving average has been generally increasing. The current 7-day average for April 14?April 20, 2021, was 5,631. This is a 1.6% increase from the prior 7-day average (5,541) from April 7?April 13, 2021.

                          5,963
                          New Admissions

                          5,631
                          Current 7-Day Average

                          2,062,916
                          Total New Admissions

                          5,541
                          Prior 7-Day Average


                          16,521
                          Peak 7-Day Average*

                          +1.6%
                          Change in 7-Day Average



                          *Highest peak for 7-day average (January 9, 2021).

                          COVID-NET: Trends in Clinical Outcomes


                          CDC?s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) now has monthly data describing severe COVID-19 over the first year of the pandemic, including data related to demographics, underlying medical and clinical outcomes, including intensive care unit admission. Among hospitalized cases, the percentage of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions declined during the first 7 months of the pandemic, then leveled off or increased in November through January. The percentage of hospitalized cases admitted to the ICU decreased in February 2021, when 15.9%, or about 1 in 6 hospitalized COVID-19 patients, were admitted to the ICU. Positive trends over the pandemic, especially during the first 7 months, may in part have been due to evolving healthcare provider and system practices, guided by increasing knowledge and experience in treating patients with COVID-19.

                          Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

                          resize iconView Larger
                          New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EST snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Timeseries Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the CMS Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                          More Hospital Data
                          Trends in Intensive Care Unit Admission in COVID-19 Associated Hospitalizations


                          resize iconView Larger
                          The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.
                          More COVID-NET Data

                          Deaths


                          The 7-day average of daily new deaths (691) decreased 3.7% compared with the prior 7-day average. As of April 21, 2021, a total of 566,494 COVID-19 deaths have been reported, including 875 new deaths.

                          875
                          New Deaths Reported

                          691
                          Current 7-Day Average*

                          566,494
                          Total Deaths Reported

                          717
                          Prior 7-Day Average

                          3,457
                          Peak of 7-day Average**

                          -3.7%
                          Change in the 7-Day Average Since the Prior Week


                          *Of 13,837 historical deaths reported retroactively (with missing report dates), 257 were reported in the current week, and 194 were reported in the prior week.

                          **The highest peak in the 7-day average of new deaths (Jan 13, 2021).

                          Note: The table above excludes historical data with missing report dates from the new deaths, the current and previous 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                          Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

                          7-Day moving average

                          resize iconView Larger
                          More Death Data



                          Recent CDC COVID-19 Publications
                          1. Post-vaccination SARS-CoV-2 Infections Among Skilled Nursing Facility Residents and Staff Members ? Chicago, Illinois, December 2020?March 2021
                          2. COVID-19 Outbreak Associated with a SARS-CoV-2 R.1 Lineage Variant in a Skilled Nursing Facility After Vaccination Program ? Kentucky, March 2021
                          Recent COVID Data Tracker Updates
                          https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

                          Comment


                          • #58

                            COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


                            Updated Apr. 30, 2021
                            Print
                            Subscribe to the Weekly Review


                            Interpretive Summary for April 30, 2021
                            Think Globally. Get Vaccinated. Travel Locally.


                            The COVID-19 pandemic continues to break daily records, even as the global vaccination pace accelerates. Additionally, multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally and within the United States. On April 19, 2021, the U.S. Department of Stateexternal icon issued a Travel Advisory Updateexternal icon resulting in a significant increase in the number of countries classified as ?Level 4: Do Not Travel,? to approximately 80% of countries worldwide.

                            With summer quickly approaching and vaccination rates increasing, many people are eager to travel. Additionally, many countries and states are loosening restrictions for visitors. CDC recommends delaying travel until you are fully vaccinated because travel increases your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19. International travel poses additional risks, and even fully vaccinated travelers are at increased risk for getting and possibly spreading new COVID-19 variants. The COVID-19 situation differs from country to country, and you should pay close attention to the situation at your destination before traveling.

                            Once you are fully vaccinated, you can travel safely within the United States but you should follow domestic travel recommendations and consider levels of community transmission when selecting a domestic travel destination. Your method of transportation, type of accommodation, and activities during travel can increase your risk of getting and spreading COVID-19. If you are not fully vaccinated and must travel, you should get tested for COVID-19 before and after travel.

                            The safest way to travel is by practicing prevention strategies and getting vaccinated. To find a vaccine provider near you, visit Vaccine Finderexternal icon or your state or local public health department website.


                            Reported Cases


                            The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (52,528) decreased 16.2% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (62,653). Compared with the highest peak on January 8, 2021 (249,669), the current 7-day average decreased 79.0%. A total of 32,031,068 COVID-19 cases have been reported as of April 28.

                            32,031,068
                            Total Cases Reported

                            52,528
                            Current 7-Day Average*

                            62,653
                            Prior 7-Day Average

                            -16.2%
                            Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

                            *Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 84,981 historical cases reported retroactively, 3,462 were reported in the current week and 4,324 were reported in the prior week.

                            Note: In the above table, historical data with missing report dates are excluded from current and prior 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                            Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

                            7-Day moving average

                            resize iconView Larger
                            More Case Data



                            SARS-CoV-2 Variants


                            Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally and within the United States. To date, five variants have been classified as a variant of concern, and the proportions of cases caused by these variants are summarized below. Based on specimens collected from March 28 to April 10, an estimated 59.2% of COVID-19 cases in the United States are caused by the SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.7. The proportion of cases caused by B.1.429 is estimated at 4.5%, and the proportion of cases caused by B.1.427 is estimated at 1.8%. Variant P.1 is estimated to comprise 3.5% of COVID-19 cases, and the proportion of B.1.351 cases is estimated to be 0.9% for the two weeks ending April 10. Proportion estimates provided in COVID Data Tracker can now be viewed at the national or regional level in 2-week intervals.

                            CDC and partners are increasing the number of specimens sequenced in laboratories around the country. For the week ending April 24, over 27,000 sequences were published in public repositories through CDC sequencing efforts. Studies are underway to determine whether variants are more transmissible, cause more severe illness, or are likely to evade immunity brought on by prior illness or vaccination.

                            Note: To paint a clearer picture of how prevalent specific variants are in the United States, CDC analyzes available genomic sequence data from specimens of SARS-CoV-2 collected from patients. These data are weighted to account for known differences in diagnostic testing and sequencing across time and geography.

                            SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

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                            More Variants Data



                            Testing


                            The percentage of COVID-19 RT-PCR tests that are positive (percent positivity) has decreased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 4.5%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for April 16-April 22 was 1,213,013, down 3.1% from 1,251,597 for the prior 7 days.

                            413,060,172
                            Total Tests Reported

                            1,213,013
                            7-Day Average Tests Reported

                            4.5%
                            7-Day Average % Positivity

                            5.1%
                            Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

                            -12.2%
                            Change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                            COVID-19 Viral (RT-PCR) Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

                            resize iconView Larger
                            More Testing Dataexternal icon



                            Vaccinations


                            The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of April 29, 237.4 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 143.7 million people, or 43.3% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 99.7 million people, or 30% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of April 29, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 2.6 million, a 10.7% decrease from the previous week.

                            The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of April 29, 82.1% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 68.4% are fully vaccinated. Just over one-half (54.9%) of people ages 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 38.4% are fully vaccinated.

                            237,360,493
                            Vaccines Administered

                            143,793,565
                            People who received at least one dose

                            99,668,945
                            People who are fully vaccinated*

                            43.3%
                            Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

                            30%
                            Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

                            +2.4
                            Percentage point increase from last week

                            +3.1
                            Percentage point increase from last week

                            *People who are fully vaccinated (formerly ?receiving 2 doses?) represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

                            Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


                            7-Day moving average

                            resize iconView Larger
                            More Vaccination Data



                            Hospitalizations

                            New Hospital Admissions


                            The current 7-day average for April 21?April 27 was 5,057. This is a 9.8% decrease from the prior 7-day average (5,607) from April 14?April 20. Previously, the 7-day moving average for new admissions had been generally increasing from March 22 until April 18.

                            2,098,135
                            Total New Admissions

                            5,057
                            Current 7-Day Average

                            5,607
                            Prior 7-Day Average

                            -9.8%
                            Change in 7-Day Average

                            Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

                            resize iconView Larger
                            New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EST snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Timeseries Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the CMS Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                            More Hospital Data



                            COVID-NET: Trends in Clinical Outcomes


                            CDC?s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) now has monthly data describing severe COVID-19 over the first year of the pandemic, including data on in-hospital deaths. Among hospitalized cases, the percentage of in-hospital deaths declined during the first 8 months of the pandemic, then increased to 12.9% in December. In February 2021, the percentage of hospitalized patients who died in the hospital decreased to 6.4%, possibly as a result of a lower proportion of older patients hospitalized compared to past months. Positive trends may also in part have been due to evolving healthcare provider and system practices, guided by increasing knowledge and experience in treating patients with COVID-19.

                            Additional information on monthly trends in clinical outcomes can be found hereexternal icon.

                            Trends in In-Hospital Deaths in COVID-19 Associated Hospitalizations


                            resize iconView Larger
                            The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.
                            More COVID-NET Data

                            Deaths


                            Since April 19, the 7-day moving average has been lower compared with the 7-day moving average of the prior week. The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (628) decreased 8.2% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (684). As of April 28, a total of 571,297 COVID-19 deaths have been reported.

                            571,297
                            Total Deaths Reported

                            628
                            Current 7-Day Average*

                            684
                            Prior 7-Day Average

                            -8.2%
                            Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

                            *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 14,101 historical deaths reported retroactively, 278 were reported in the current week and 243 were reported in the prior week.

                            Note: In the above table, historical data with missing report dates are excluded from current and prior 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                            Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

                            7-Day moving average

                            resize iconView Larger
                            More Death Data



                            Recent CDC COVID-19 Publications
                            1. Updated Recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for Use of the Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) COVID-19 Vaccine After Reports of Thrombosis with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Among Vaccine Recipients ? United States, April 2021
                            2. Health Care Utilization and Clinical Characteristics of Nonhospitalized Adults in an Integrated Health Care System 28?180 Days After COVID-19 Diagnosis ? Georgia, May 2020?March 2021
                            3. Airport Traveler Testing Program for SARS-CoV-2 ? Alaska, June?November 2020
                            4. COVID-19 Outbreaks in Correctional Facilities with Work-Release Programs ? Idaho, July?November 2020
                            5. Laboratory Modeling of SARS-CoV-2 Exposure Reduction Through Physically Distanced Seating in Aircraft Cabins Using Bacteriophage Aerosol ? November 2020
                            6. Effectiveness of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna Vaccines Against COVID-19 Among Hospitalized Adults Aged ?65 Years ? United States, January?March 2021
                            Recent COVID Data Tracker Updates

                            Comment


                            • #59

                              COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


                              Updated May 7, 2021
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                              Interpretive Summary for May 7, 2021
                              Going Once? Going Twice? Vaccinated!


                              resize iconView Larger
                              Following a rapid acceleration in vaccination rates, we are now seeing U.S. vaccination progress slow. This is not surprising considering the prior focus on vaccinating people at increased risk. Also, people eager to be immunized when they became eligible may have already secured their vaccine in line with increased supply. While more than 8 in 10 people 65 years and older have received at least one dose of vaccine, only around 1 in 3 people ages 18-29 have. All age groups currently eligible for the vaccine can benefit from the protection it provides themselves and others, especially as more states are easing prevention measures.

                              Three COVID-19 vaccines are currently authorized and recommended for use in the United States, including the one-dose Johnson & Johnson/Janssen vaccine and the two-dose Pfizer BioNTech and Moderna vaccines. All three vaccines are safe, effective, and reduce your risk of severe illness. To receive the most protection, you should receive all recommended doses of a COVID-19 vaccine. It typically takes about two weeks after your last dose for the body to build full protection, which means you should still practice the same prevention measures you did before vaccination. Once you are fully vaccinated, you can start doing many things you had stopped doing because of the pandemic.

                              Everyone who gets vaccinated does so for a reason?to protect themselves and their family, or to safely get back to activities like seeing friends, resuming work, or returning to school. Still, some people are hesitant to get their COVID-19 vaccine. COVID-19 vaccines are new, and it?s normal for people to have questions about them. If you or someone you know is hesitant about COVID-19 vaccination, CDC has information to help with the decision. To find a vaccine provider near you, visit Vaccines.gov or your state or local public health department website.


                              Reported Cases


                              The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (45,817) decreased 13.2% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (52,772). Compared with the highest peak on January 8, 2021 (249,672), the current 7-day average decreased 81.6%. A total of 32,356,034 COVID-19 cases have been reported as of May 5.

                              32,356,034
                              Total Cases Reported

                              45,817
                              Current 7-Day Average*

                              52,772
                              Prior 7-Day Average

                              -13.2%
                              Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

                              *Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 86,630 historical cases reported retroactively, 1,649 were reported in the current week and 3,462 were reported in the prior week.

                              Note: In the above table, historical data with missing report dates are excluded from current and prior 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                              Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

                              7-Day moving average

                              resize iconView Larger
                              More Case Data



                              SARS-CoV-2 Variants


                              Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally and within the United States. To date, five variants have been classified as a variant of concern, and the weighted estimates of proportions of SARS-CoV-2 cases caused by these variants are summarized below.

                              Based on specimens collected from March 28 to April 10, an estimated 59.6% of COVID-19 cases in the United States are caused by the SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.1.7. Twenty-five states now have B.1.1.7 proportions greater than 30%. The proportion of cases caused by B.1.429 is estimated at 4.4%, and the proportion of cases caused by B.1.427 is estimated at 1.7%. California continues to have the highest proportion of B.1.427/429 at 38.4%. Variant P.1 is estimated to comprise 3.7% of COVID-19 cases, and the proportion of B.1.351 cases is estimated to be 1.0% for the two weeks ending April 10. Proportion estimates provided in COVID Data Tracker can now be viewed at the national or regional level in 2-week intervals.

                              Note: To paint a clearer picture of how prevalent specific variants are in the United States, CDC analyzes available genomic sequence data from specimens of SARS-CoV-2 collected from patients. These data are weighted to account for known differences in diagnostic testing and sequencing across time and geography. Nowcasting (modeling) estimates are now available on the Variant Proportions tab of the COVID Data Tracker.

                              SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

                              resize iconView Larger

                              resize iconView Larger
                              More Variants Data



                              Testing


                              The percentage of COVID-19 RT-PCR tests that are positive (percent positivity) has decreased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 4.0%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for April 23-April 29 was 1,185,345, down 3.8% from 1,232,468 for the prior 7 days.

                              421,479,492
                              Total Tests Reported

                              1,185,345
                              7-Day Average Tests Reported

                              4.0%
                              7-Day Average % Positivity

                              4.4 %
                              Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

                              -8.5%
                              Change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                              COVID-19 Viral (RT-PCR) Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

                              resize iconView Larger
                              More Testing Dataexternal icon



                              Vaccinations


                              The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of May 6, 252 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 149.5 million people, or 45% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 108.9 million people, or 32.8% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of May 6, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 2.1 million, a 26% decrease from the previous week.

                              The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of May 6, 83.0% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 70.2% are fully vaccinated. Over one-half (57%) of people ages 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 41.9% are fully vaccinated.

                              251,973,752
                              Vaccines Administered

                              149,462,265
                              People who received at least one dose

                              108,926,627
                              People who are fully vaccinated*

                              45.0%
                              Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

                              32.8%
                              Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

                              +1.7
                              Percentage point increase from last week

                              +2.8
                              Percentage point increase from last week

                              *People who are fully vaccinated represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

                              Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


                              7-Day moving average

                              resize iconView Larger
                              More Vaccination Data



                              Hospitalizations

                              New Hospital Admissions


                              The current 7-day average for April 28?May 4 was 4,640. This is an 8.4% decrease from the prior 7-day average (5,066) from April 21?April 27. The 7-day moving average for new admissions has been consistently decreasing since April 19.

                              2,127,202
                              Total New Admissions

                              4,640
                              Current 7-Day Average

                              5,066
                              Prior 7-Day Average

                              -8.4%
                              Change in 7-Day Average

                              Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

                              resize iconView Larger
                              New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EST snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Timeseries Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the CMS Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                              More Hospital Data



                              COVID-NET: Trends in Hospitalizations in Adults ?65 Years


                              Older adults are at increased risk for severe COVID-19 illness, including an increased risk for hospitalization. Since the start of the pandemic, people ages 65 and older were the age group with the largest percentage of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations, sometimes accounting for more than half of hospitalizations. Beginning in January, the proportion of cases in older adults began to decline as overall rates fell. Data from April show that people ages 65 and older now account for fewer than 1 in 3 hospitalizations. Since the beginning of April, people 18?49 years and 50?64 years both account for a larger portion of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations than people 65 years and older. This decline in the proportion of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations in older adults coincides with continued increased vaccination coverage in this age group.

                              Trends in COVID-19 Associated Hospitalizations in Adults ?65 Years




                              resize iconView Larger
                              The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associate??d Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.
                              More COVID-NET Data

                              Deaths


                              The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (656) increased 3.8% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (632). As of May 5, a total of 576,238 COVID-19 deaths have been reported.

                              576,238
                              Total Deaths Reported

                              656
                              Current 7-Day Average*

                              632
                              Prior 7-Day Average

                              3.8%
                              Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

                              *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 14,357 historical deaths reported retroactively, 256 were reported in the current week and 278 were reported in the prior week.

                              Note: In the above table, historical data with missing report dates are excluded from current and prior 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                              Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

                              7-Day moving average

                              resize iconView Larger
                              More Death Data



                              Recent CDC COVID-19 Publications
                              1. Rapid Emergence and Epidemiologic Characteristics of the SARS-CoV-2 B.1.526 Variant ? New York City, New York, January 1?April 5, 2021
                              2. Identification of and Surveillance for the SARS-CoV-2 Variants B.1.427 and B.1.429 ? Colorado, January?March 2021
                              3. Modeling of Future COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations, and Deaths, by Vaccination Rates and Nonpharmaceutical Intervention Scenarios ? United States, April?September 2021
                              4. Safety Monitoring of the Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) COVID-19 Vaccine ? United States, March?April 2021
                              5. Anxiety-Related Adverse Event Clusters After Janssen COVID-19 Vaccination ? Five U.S. Mass Vaccination Sites, April 2021
                              6. COVID-19 Outbreak Among Farmworkers ? Okanogan County, Washington, May?August 2020
                              7. COVID-19 Among Workers in the Seafood Processing Industry: Implications for Prevention Measures ? Alaska, March?October 2020
                              8. Linked Clusters of SARS-CoV-2 Variant B.1.351 ? Maryland, January?February 2021
                              9. Postvaccination SARS-CoV-2 Infections Among Skilled Nursing Facility Residents and Staff Members ? Chicago, Illinois, December 2020?March 2021
                              10. COVID-19 Outbreak Associated with a SARS-CoV-2 R.1 Lineage Variant in a Skilled Nursing Facility After Vaccination Program ? Kentucky, March 2021
                              Recent COVID Data Tracker Updates
                              • Updated Vaccination Demographic Trends tab now displays vaccination progress in the United States by sex and racial/ethnic group
                              • Updated Cases, Deaths, and Testing tab displays case, death, and testing metrics in one location along with the level of community transmission by state, territory, or jurisdiction
                              • Updated Variant Proportions tab now shows nowcast weighted estimates of variant proportions for the most recent 2-week interval

                              https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

                              Comment


                              • #60

                                COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


                                Updated May 14, 2021
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                                Interpretive Summary for May 14, 2021
                                Slay the Virus

                                On May 10, 2021, the Food and Drug Administrationexternal icon (FDA) issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine for use in adolescents ages 12-15 years. On May 14, CDC?s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) issued an interim recommendation in support of the EUA for the prevention of COVID-19 in adolescents ages 12-15 years. Additionally, CDC recently announced that fully vaccinated people, including adolescents, no longer need to wear masks in most situations. These announcements come as many families are looking forward to summer plans, including camp, youth sports, and travel. Authorization also comes as young people make up a rising proportion of new coronavirus cases in the United States.

                                Vaccinating adolescents is an important step toward stopping the spread of COVID-19. Yet, adolescent vaccination has been met with mixed reactions, with some parents eager to vaccinate their children against COVID-19, and others expressing hesitancy. Pfizer?s COVID-19 vaccine was found to be safe and effective in adolescents between the ages of 12-15 years in clinical trials. Side effects were generally consistent with those experienced by people ages 16-25 years. Side effects are typically normal signs that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19.

                                The COVID-19 pandemic has taken a toll on the mental health of many people, including adolescents. But as more people become eligible for vaccination, we have reason to be hopeful. In addition to preventing severe illness, COVID-19 vaccines will help adolescents safely return to doing the things they love ? whether that?s school, sports and other extracurricular activities, or socializing with friends. If you or someone you know is considering adolescent COVID-19 vaccination, talk with your pediatrician or family physician about the benefits of vaccination. CDC also has resources on credible vaccine information, and support for teens and young adults facing challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic.


                                Reported Cases


                                The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (35,442) decreased 23.6% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (46,390). Compared with the highest peak on January 8, 2021 (250,037), the current 7-day average decreased 85.8%. A total of 32,643,851 COVID-19 cases have been reported as of May 12.

                                32,643,851
                                Total Cases Reported

                                35,442
                                Current 7-Day Average*

                                46,390
                                Prior 7-Day Average

                                -23.6%
                                Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

                                *Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 89,986 historical cases reported retroactively, 1,651 were reported in the current week and 1,649 were reported in the prior week.

                                Note: In the above table, historical data with missing report dates are excluded from current and prior 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                                Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

                                7-Day moving average

                                resize iconView Larger
                                More Case Data



                                SARS-CoV-2 Variants


                                Nowcast estimates are now available on COVID Data Tracker. Current nowcast estimates are modeled data based on sequencing data from previous weeks. Nowcast provides timely estimates for the present, while accounting for limited sequence data availability, as specimens from the most current time interval are still being processed.

                                Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally and within the United States. To date, five variants have been classified as a variant of concern (VOC). Nowcast estimates of SARS-CoV-2 cases caused by these VOCs for the two weeks ending May 8 are summarized here. Nationally, B.1.1.7 proportions are predicted to increase to 72.4%; P.1 proportions are predicted to increase to 6.2%; B.1.427/B.1.429 proportions are predicted to decrease; and B.1.351 proportions are predicted to decrease. Nowcast estimates predict that B.1.1.7 proportions will increase to more than 60% in HHS regions 3 ? 10. B.1.351 is predicted to increase in regions 3 and 10; P.1 is predicted to increase in all regions except 7 and 8; and B.1.427/429 will be highest in regions 9 and 10. B.1.617.2, a new variant of interest, is predicted to increase in regions 2, and 7 ? 9.

                                SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

                                resize iconView Larger

                                resize iconView Larger
                                More Variants Data



                                Testing


                                The percentage of COVID-19 RT-PCR tests that are positive (percent positivity) has decreased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 3.4%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for April 30-May 6 was 1,084,898, down 9.9% from 1,203,977 for the prior 7 days.

                                429,553,942
                                Total Tests Reported

                                1,084,898
                                7-Day Average Tests Reported

                                3.4%
                                7-Day Average % Positivity

                                4.0 %
                                Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

                                -15.0%
                                Change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                                COVID-19 Viral (RT-PCR) Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

                                resize iconView Larger
                                More Testing Dataexternal icon



                                Vaccinations


                                The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of May 13, 266.6 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 154.6 million people, or 46.6% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 119 million people, or 35.8% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of May 13, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 2.09 million, a 0.06% increase from the previous week.

                                The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of May 13, 84.0% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 71.8% are fully vaccinated. Over one-half (58.9%) of people ages 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 45.6% are fully vaccinated.

                                266,596,486
                                Vaccines Administered

                                154,624,231
                                People who received at least one dose

                                118,987,308
                                People who are fully vaccinated*

                                46.6%
                                Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

                                35.8%
                                Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

                                +1.6
                                Percentage point increase from last week

                                +3.0
                                Percentage point increase from last week

                                *People who are fully vaccinated represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

                                Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


                                7-Day moving average

                                resize iconView Larger
                                More Vaccination Data



                                Hospitalizations

                                New Hospital Admissions


                                The current 7-day average for May 5?May 11 was 4,049. This is a 12.4% decrease from the prior 7-day average (4,624) from April 28?May 4. The 7-day moving average for new admissions has been consistently decreasing since April 19.

                                2,178,309
                                Total New Admissions

                                4,049
                                Current 7-Day Average

                                4,624
                                Prior 7-Day Average

                                -12.4%
                                Change in 7-Day Average

                                Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

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                                New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EST snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Timeseries Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the CMS Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                                More Hospital Data



                                COVID-NET: Trends in Hospitalizations in Children 5-17 years, including adolescents ages 12-17 years


                                Children ages 5-17 years have the lowest hospitalization rate of all age groups; however, children can experience severe illness and hospitalization associated with COVID-19. Hospitalization rates in adolescents ages 12-17 are comparable to those among children ages 0-4 years, and higher than those among children ages 5-11 years.

                                Among children ages 5-17 years, weekly COVID-19-associated hospitalization peaked at 1.3 per 100,000 persons in early January, then decreased to 0.4 per 100,000 persons in mid-March. However, data from late March and April show that hospitalization rates have steadily increased among children ages 5-17 years, increasing more than 200% since mid-March to 0.9 per 100,000 persons by late April. Hospitalization rates have increased in all pediatric age groups.

                                Rising hospitalization rates in children highlight the need for continuing prevention efforts, including mask-wearing and physical distancing. Now that COVID-19 vaccination is authorized for adolescents ages 12 years and older, implementation of COVID-19 vaccines for all eligible people is another critical tool to reduce the risk of COVID-19 hospitalization in children.

                                Trends in Hospitalizations in Children Ages 5-17 Years


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                                The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associate??d Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.
                                More COVID-NET Data

                                Deaths


                                The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (592) decreased 10.3% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (660). As of May 12, a total of 580,837 COVID-19 deaths have been reported.

                                580,837
                                Total Deaths Reported

                                592
                                Current 7-Day Average*

                                660
                                Prior 7-Day Average

                                -10.3%
                                Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

                                *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 14,470 historical deaths reported retroactively, 213 were reported in the current week and 236 were reported in the prior week.

                                Note: In the above table, historical data with missing report dates are excluded from current and prior 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

                                Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

                                7-Day moving average

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                                More Death Data



                                Recent CDC COVID-19 Publications
                                1. Demographic and Social Factors Associated with COVID-19 Vaccination Initiation Among Adults Aged ?65 Years ? United States, December 14, 2020?April 10, 2021
                                2. Diagnostic Performance of an Antigen Test with RT-PCR for the Detection of SARS-CoV-2 in a Hospital Setting ? Los Angeles County, California, June?August 2020
                                3. Community-Based Testing for SARS-CoV-2 ? Chicago, Illinois, May?November 2020
                                4. Rapid Emergence and Epidemiologic Characteristics of the SARS-CoV-2 B.1.526 Variant ? New York City, New York, January 1?April 5, 2021
                                5. Identification of and Surveillance for the SARS-CoV-2 Variants B.1.427 and B.1.429 ? Colorado, January?March 2021
                                6. Modeling of Future COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations, and Deaths, by Vaccination Rates and Nonpharmaceutical Intervention Scenarios ? United States, April?September 2021
                                7. Demographic and Social Factors Associated with COVID-19 Vaccination Initiation Among Adults Aged ?65 Years ? United States, December 14, 2020?April 10, 2021
                                Recent COVID Data Tracker Updates
                                • Addition of 12-15-year-old age group as a population of interest on the Vaccinations in the US tab
                                • Updated Vaccination data on the County View tab shows the percentage of the population 12 years and over that is fully vaccinated by county
                                • Addition of more bars to indicate vaccination administration in the last 14 days for each demographic category on the Vaccination Demographics tab
                                • Addition of a new visualization to the New Hospital Admissions tab to show hospital admissions over time by state and age group

                                https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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