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  • #61

    COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


    Updated May 21, 2021



    Interpretive Summary for May 21, 2021
    Summer, Sun, and Safe Fun


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    COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths are going down, and the number of people vaccinated continues to go up, providing a sense of optimism as summer approaches. As of May 20, 48.4% of the U.S. population ages 18 years and older is fully vaccinated, and 60.5% have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Additionally, as of last week, millions more are now eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. These trends and new CDC evidence-based guidance on masking provide encouragement that we are making progress toward returning to a sense of normalcy.

    As you look ahead to summer, consider how COVID-19 is spreading in your community when choosing activities. Outdoor activities and visits are safer than those indoors, but fully vaccinated people can participate in most indoor activities without much risk. If you are not yet vaccinated, you should continue to practice prevention strategies such as wearing a well-fitted mask, practicing physical distancing, avoiding crowds, and washing your hands.

    For more than a year, many people have focused on staying safe from COVID-19. While this continues to be important, returning to regular activities when you are fully vaccinated, such as travel, events, and other social gatherings, can provide hope for the days ahead. In addition, taking simple actions such as deep breathing, physical activity, healthy eating, practicing good sleep habits, and safely connecting with family, friends, and neighbors can improve your well-being.


    Reported Cases


    The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (27,789) decreased 19.5% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (34,502). Compared with the highest peak on January 8, 2021 (252,768), the current 7-day average decreased 89.0%. A total of 32,855,010 COVID-19 cases have been reported as of May 19.

    32,855,010
    Total Cases Reported

    27,789
    Current 7-Day Average*

    34,502
    Prior 7-Day Average

    -19.5%
    Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

    *Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 85,596 historical cases reported retroactively, 246 were reported on the most recent submission date; 1,918 in the current week; and 1,461 were reported in the prior week.

    Note: In the above table, historical data with missing report dates are excluded from current and prior 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

    Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

    7-Day moving average

    resize iconView Larger
    More Case Data



    SARS-CoV-2 Variants


    Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally and within the United States. To date, five variants have been classified as a variant of concern (VOC). Nowcast estimates* of SARS-CoV-2 cases caused by these VOCs for the two weeks ending May 8 are summarized here. Nationally, B.1.1.7 proportions are predicted to increase to 74%; P.1 proportions are predicted to increase to 7%; B.1.427/B.1.429 proportions are predicted to increase; and B.1.351 proportions are predicted to decrease. Nowcast estimates predict that B.1.1.7 proportions will increase to more than 60% in all but HHS region 1. B.1.351 is predicted to increase in regions 3, 4, 9, and 10; P.1 is predicted to increase in all regions; and B.1.427/429 will be highest in regions 9 and 10. B.1.617.2, a new variant of interest, is predicted to be highest in regions 1, 6, 8, and 9.

    *Current nowcast estimates are modeled data based on sequencing data from previous weeks. Nowcast provides timely estimates for the present, while accounting for limited sequence data availability, as specimens from the most current time interval are still being processed.

    SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

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    resize iconView Larger
    More Variants Data



    Testing


    The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests) that are positive (percent positivity) has decreased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 3.0%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for May 7-May 13 was 1,007,699, down 9.4% from 1,112,391 for the prior 7 days.

    437,214,993
    Total Tests Reported

    1,007,699
    7-Day Average Tests Reported

    3.0%
    7-Day Average % Positivity

    3.4%
    Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

    -12.6%
    Change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

    COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

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    More Testing Dataexternal icon



    Vaccinations


    The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of May 20, 279.4 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 160.2 million people, or 48.2% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 126.6 million people, or 38.1% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of May 20, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 1.8 million, a 12.5% decrease from the previous week.

    The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of May 19, 84.9% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 73.2% are fully vaccinated. Over half (60.5%) of people ages 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 48.4% are fully vaccinated.

    279,397,250
    Vaccines Administered

    160,177,820
    People who received at least one dose

    126,605,166
    People who are fully vaccinated*

    48.2%
    Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

    38.1%
    Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

    +1.6
    Percentage point increase from last week

    +2.3
    Percentage point increase from last week

    *People who are fully vaccinated represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

    Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


    7-Day moving average

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    More Vaccination Data



    Hospitalizations

    New Hospital Admissions


    The current 7-day average for May 12–May 18 was 3,438. This is a 15.1% decrease from the prior 7-day average (4,051) from May 5–May 11. The 7-day moving average for new admissions has been consistently decreasing since April 19.

    2,202,437
    Total New Admissions

    3,438
    Current 7-Day Average

    4,051
    Prior 7-Day Average

    -15.1%
    Change in 7-Day Average

    Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

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    New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EST snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Timeseries Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the CMS Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

    More Hospital Data



    COVID-NET: Recent Trends in Hospitalizations in Non-Hispanic Black Persons


    Since the start of the pandemic, people from racial and ethnic minority groups have been at increased risk for COVID-19-associated hospitalizations compared to non-Hispanic White persons. While rates of hospitalizations have fallen in all race and ethnicity groups since January 2021, the hospitalization rate for non-Hispanic Black persons remains higher than other groups and has been nearly twice as high as rates in non-Hispanic White persons since late January. After falling in January and February 2021, hospitalization rates increased again in all groups beginning in early March. The weekly rate of hospitalizations for non-Hispanic Black persons reached 17.3 per 100,000 population for the week ending April 17, double the rate for non-Hispanic White persons (7.9 per 100,000 population for the same week). While preliminary data for late April and early May show rates again decreasing for all groups, the hospitalization rate in non-Hispanic Black persons remains one of the highest.

    Trends in Hospitalizations by Race/Ethnicity*


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    *Only White, Black, and Hispanic/Latino groups were included in this figure. Additional race/ethnicity groups can be viewed by selecting Weekly Rates by Race/Ethnicity at the More COVID-NET Data link.

    The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associate­­d Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.
    More COVID-NET Data

    Deaths


    The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (498) decreased 10.5% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (556). As of May 19, a total of 584,975 COVID-19 deaths have been reported.

    584,975
    Total Deaths Reported

    498
    Current 7-Day Average*

    556
    Prior 7-Day Average

    -10.5%
    Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

    *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 11,165 historical deaths reported retroactively, 182 were reported for the most recent submission date; 223 in the current week; and 6 were reported in the prior week.

    Note: In the above table, historical data with missing report dates are excluded from current and prior 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

    Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

    7-Day moving average

    resize iconView Larger
    More Death Data



    Recent CDC COVID-19 Publications
    1. Characteristics of COVID-19 Cases and Outbreaks at Child Care Facilities — District of Columbia, July–December 2020
    2. Disparities in COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage Between Urban and Rural Counties — United States, December 14, 2020–April 10, 2021
    3. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices’ Interim Recommendation for Use of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine in Adolescents Aged 12–15 Years — United States, May 2021
    4. Interim Estimates of Vaccine Effectiveness of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 Vaccines Among Health Care Personnel — 33 U.S. Sites, January–March 2021
    Recent COVID Data Tracker Updateshttps://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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    • #62

      COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


      Print
      Subscribe to the Weekly Review


      Interpretive Summary for June 4, 2021
      Trending: Teens


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      A recent CDC study found COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates among adolescents ages 12-17 years increased during March and April, following declines in January and February 2021. This trend differed from hospitalization rates among people ages 65 years and older—the age group with the highest COVID-19 vaccination coverage—who saw hospitalization rates stabilize during the same timeframe.

      While rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalization in adolescents are lower than those in adults, cases of severe disease (including those requiring ICU admission or mechanical ventilation) have been documented in this age group. Recent increases in COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates and the potential for severe disease in adolescents reinforce the importance of continued prevention strategies, including vaccination and the correct and consistent use of masks in those who are not yet fully vaccinated.

      With summer upon us, many adolescents are looking forward to returning to activities they may have missed last summer, including travel, hanging out with friends, work, and summer camp. Vaccinating adolescents is an important step toward stopping the spread of COVID-19. As of June 3, 2021, more than 5.9 million adolescents ages 12-17 years have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Fully vaccinated adolescents are at low risk of symptomatic or severe infection and are less likely to transmit COVID-19 to others. If you or someone you know is considering adolescent vaccination, talk with your pediatrician or healthcare provider about the benefits of vaccination. To find a vaccine provider near you, visit vaccines.gov.

      Note to Readers: This week, CDC celebrates the 70th anniversary of the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) program, a unique training program of service and on-the-job learning. CDC’s EIS officers—better known as CDC’s elite “disease detectives”—have served on the front lines of public health, investigating threats in the United States and around the world. During the COVID-19 pandemic, more than 120 EIS officers have deployed nearly 400 times to airport screening stations, quarantine stations, state and local health departments, and the CDC Emergency Operations Center to assist with the nation’s response to COVID-19.


      Reported Cases


      The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (14,349) decreased 35.2% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (22,139). Compared with the highest peak on January 9, 2021 (251,374), the current 7-day average decreased 94.3%. A total of 33,130,027 COVID-19 cases have been reported as of June 2.

      33,130,027
      Total Cases Reported

      14,349
      Current 7-Day Average*

      22,139
      Prior 7-Day Average

      -35.2%
      Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

      *Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 71,176 historical cases reported retroactively, 1 was reported in the current week and none were reported in the prior week.

      Note: In the above table, historical data with missing report dates are excluded from current and prior 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.


      Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

      7-Day moving average

      resize iconView Larger
      More Case Data



      SARS-CoV-2 Variants


      Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally and within the United States. To date, five variants have been classified as a variant of concern (VOC). Nowcast estimates* of SARS-CoV-2 cases caused by these VOCs for the two weeks ending May 22 are summarized here. Nationally, B.1.1.7 proportions are predicted to increase to 73%; P.1 proportions are predicted to increase to 9.8%. B.1.427/B.1.429 proportions are predicted to decrease; and B.1.351 proportions are predicted to stay the same. Nowcast estimates predict that B.1.1.7 proportions will remain at more than 60% in all but HHS regions 1, 2, and 10. B.1.351 is predicted to remain higher in regions 7, 9, and 10; P.1 is predicted to be more than 10% in regions 1 and 10; and B.1.427/429 will remain highest in regions 9 and 10. B.1.617.2, a variant of interest, is predicted to be higher in regions 6, 7, 8, and 9.

      *Current Nowcast estimates are modeled data based on sequencing data from previous weeks. Nowcast provides timely estimates for the present, while accounting for limited sequence data availability, as specimens from the most current time interval are still being processed.

      SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

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      resize iconView Larger
      More Variants Data



      Testing


      The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests) that are positive (percent positivity) has decreased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 2.2%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for May 21-May 27 was 814,444, down 11.2% from 916,804 for the prior 7 days.

      449,236,831
      Total Tests Reported

      814,444
      7-Day Average Tests Reported

      2.2%
      7-Day Average % Positivity

      2.5%
      Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

      -14.5%
      Change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

      COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

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      More Testing Dataexternal icon



      Vaccinations


      The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of June 3, 297.7 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 169.1 million people, or 50.9% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 136.6 million people, or 41.2% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated. As of June 3, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 1.0 million, a 38.2% decrease from the previous week.

      The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of June 3, 86% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 75% are fully vaccinated. Over half (63%) of people ages 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 52% are fully vaccinated.

      297,720,928
      Vaccines Administered

      169,090,262
      People who received at least one dose

      136,644,618
      People who are fully vaccinated*

      50.9%
      Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

      41.2%
      Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

      +1.0
      Percentage point increase from last week

      +1.2
      Percentage point increase from last week

      *People who are fully vaccinated represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

      Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


      7-Day moving average

      resize iconView Larger
      More Vaccination Data



      Hospitalizations

      New Hospital Admissions


      The current 7-day average for May 26–June 1 was 2,574. This is a 17.8% decrease from the prior 7-day average (3,132) from May 19–May 25. The current 7-day average is the lowest 7-day average since August 1, 2020.* The 7-day moving average for new admissions has been consistently decreasing since April 19.

      2,227,705
      Total New Admissions

      2,574
      Current 7-Day Average

      3,132
      Prior 7-Day Average

      -17.8%
      Change in 7-Day Average

      *The start of consistent reporting of hospitalization data was August 1, 2020.

      Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

      resize iconView Larger
      New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EST snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Timeseries Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the CMS Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

      More Hospital Data



      COVID-NET: Rate of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations in Adolescents Ages 12–17 Years


      CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) now has data describing COVID-19-associated hospitalizations in adolescents ages 12–17 years. While rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalization in adolescents ages 12–17 years are lower than those in adults, cases of severe disease have been documented in this younger age group. Weekly adolescent hospitalization rates peaked at 2.1 per 100,000 in early January 2021, declined to 0.6 in mid-March, and then rose again through April and early May to a peak of 1.5 per 100,000.

      Additional information on COVID-19-associated hospitalizations in adolescents ages 12–17 years can be found in a new report using COVID-NET data here.

      Rate of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations in Adolescents Ages 12–17 Years


      resize iconView Larger
      The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.
      More COVID-NET Data

      Deaths


      The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (325) has decreased 21.6% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (414). As of June 2, a total of 592,776 COVID-19 deaths have been reported.

      592,776
      Total Deaths Reported

      325
      Current 7-Day Average*

      414
      Prior 7-Day Average

      -21.6%
      Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

      *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 11,315 historical deaths reported retroactively, 293 were reported in the current week and 134 were reported in the prior week.

      Note: In the above table, historical data with missing report dates are excluded from current and prior 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

      Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

      7-Day moving average

      resize iconView Larger
      More Death Data



      Recent CDC COVID-19 Publications
      1. Hospitalization of Adolescents Aged 12–17 Years with Laboratory-Confirmed COVID-19 — COVID-NET, 14 States, March 1, 2020–April 24, 2021
      2. COVID-19 Severity and COVID-19-Associated Deaths Among Hospitalized Patients with HIV Infection — Zambia, March–December 2020
      3. Impact of Policy and Funding Decisions on COVID-19 Surveillance Operations and Case Reports — South Sudan, April 2020–February 2021
      4. Patterns in COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage, by Social Vulnerability and Urbanicity — United States, December 14, 2020–May 1, 2021
      Recent COVID Data Tracker Updates
      https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

      Comment


      • #63

        COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


        Print
        Subscribe to the Weekly Review


        Interpretive Summary for June 11, 2021
        Healthier Together


        resize iconView Larger


        Long-standing systemic health and social inequities have put many people from racial and ethnic minority groups at increased risk from COVID-19. These inequities can also undermine a person’s physical, social, economic, and emotional health. Since the beginning of the pandemic, some racial and ethnic minority groups have experienced higher rates of COVID-19 infection, severe illness, hospitalization, and death.

        Conditions in the places where people live, learn, work, play, worship, and age affect a wide range of health risks and outcomes. These and other conditions are known as social determinants of health. Some of the many inequities in the social determinants of health that put racial and ethnic minority groups at increased risk of getting sick and dying from COVID-19 include discrimination, healthcare access, occupation, gaps in education or income, and housing. These factors and others may have also contributed to higher rates of some medical conditions that increase a person’s risk of severe illness from COVID-19. In addition, community strategies to slow the spread of COVID-19 might cause unintentional harm, such as lost wages, reduced access to services, and increased stress for some racial and ethnic minority groups.

        We all have a part in helping to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and in promoting fair access to health. To do this, we must work together to ensure that all people have resources to maintain their physical and mental health. Achieving health equity requires valuing everyone equally with focused and ongoing efforts to address avoidable inequities and historical and contemporary injustices, and to eliminate health and healthcare disparities. When policies, programs, and systems that support health are equitable, poor health outcomes can be reduced, health disparities can be prevented, and the whole of society benefits.

        Note to Readers: COVID Data Tracker recently released a new Health Equity Data Page that catalogs current health equity-related data on the COVID Data Tracker. To explore additional information about health equity and the activities CDC supports to address health disparities within the COVID-19 response, visit Health Equity: Promoting Fair Access to Health and Health Equity in Action.


        Reported Cases


        The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (13,997) decreased 6.0% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (14,890). Compared with the highest peak on January 10, 2021 (251,834), the current 7-day average decreased 94.4%. A total of 33,246,578 COVID-19 cases have been reported as of June 9.

        33,246,578
        Total Cases Reported

        13,997
        Current 7-Day Average*

        14,890
        Prior 7-Day Average

        -6.0%
        Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

        *Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 83,655 historical cases reported retroactively, 12,479 were reported in the current week and 1 was reported in the prior week.

        Note: In the above table, historical data with missing report dates are excluded from current and prior 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.


        Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

        7-Day moving average

        resize iconView Larger
        More Case Data



        SARS-CoV-2 Variants


        Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally and within the United States. To date, five variants have been classified as a variant of concern (VOC). Nowcast estimates* of SARS-CoV-2 cases caused by these VOCs for the two weeks ending June 5 are summarized here. Nationally, B.1.1.7 proportions are predicted to remain at 69%; P.1 proportions are predicted to increase from 8% to 11%. B.1.427/B.1.429 proportions are predicted to decrease; and B.1.351 proportions are predicted to decrease. Nowcast estimates predict that B.1.1.7 proportions will remain at more than 60% in all but HHS regions 1 and 2. B.1.351 is predicted to be less than 1% in all regions; P.1 is predicted to be more than 10% in regions 1, 4, 5, 7, 9 and 10; and B.1.427/429 will continue to decline in all regions. B.1.617.2, a variant of interest, is predicted to be more than 4% in all but region 4 and highest in regions 8 and 9.

        *Current nowcast estimates are modeled data based on sequencing data from previous weeks. Nowcast provides timely estimates for the present, while accounting for limited sequence data availability, as specimens from the most current time interval are still being processed.

        SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

        resize iconView Larger

        resize iconView Larger
        More Variants Data



        Testing


        The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests) that are positive (percent positivity) has decreased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 1.8%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for May 28-Jun 3 was 677,764 down 17.8% from 824,188 for the prior 7 days.

        454,141,202
        Total Tests Reported

        677,764
        7-Day Average Tests Reported

        1.8 %
        7-Day Average % Positivity

        2.2%
        Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity

        -16.5%
        Change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

        COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

        resize iconView Larger
        More Testing Dataexternal icon



        Vaccinations


        The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of June 10, 305.7 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 172.4 million people, or 51.9% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 141.6 million people, or 42.6% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of June 10, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported to CDC per day was 1.1 million, a 13.87% increase from the previous week.

        The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of June 10, 86.5% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 75.8% are fully vaccinated. For people ages 18 or older, 64% have received at least one dose of vaccine and 53.4% are fully vaccinated. For people ages 12 or older, 61.5% have received at least one dose of vaccine and 50.5% are fully vaccinated.

        305,687,618
        Vaccines Administered

        172,423,605
        People who received at least one dose

        141,583,252
        People who are fully vaccinated*

        51.9%
        Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

        42.6%
        Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

        +1.0
        Percentage point increase from last week

        +1.4
        Percentage point increase from last week

        *People who are fully vaccinated represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

        Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


        7-Day moving average

        resize iconView Larger
        More Vaccination Data



        Hospitalizations

        New Hospital Admissions


        The current 7-day average for June 2–June 8 was 2,239. This is a 12.8% decrease from the prior 7-day average (2,567) from May 26–June 1. The 7-day moving average for new admissions has been generally decreasing since April 19.

        2,243,371
        Total New Admissions

        2,239
        Current 7-Day Average

        2,567
        Prior 7-Day Average

        -12.8%
        Change in 7-Day Average

        *The start of consistent reporting of hospitalization data was August 1, 2020.

        Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

        resize iconView Larger
        New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EST snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Timeseries Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the CMS Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

        More Hospital Data



        COVID-NET: Recent Trends in Hospitalizations in Non-Hispanic American Indian and Alaska Native People


        Since the start of the pandemic, people from racial and ethnic minority groups have been at increased risk for COVID-19-associated hospitalizations compared to non-Hispanic White persons. While rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations have fallen in all race and ethnicity groups since January 2021, the hospitalization rates for non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native people have risen in recent weeks.* In late March 2021, the rate of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations in non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native people reached 4.6 per 100,000 people, one of the lowest rates seen in this group since the start of the pandemic. Since then, rates have risen to 14.4 per 100,000 people for the week ending May 8, the highest seen in all race and ethnicity groups for that week.

        *It is important to note that these increases might be driven by a limited number of COVID-NET sites and might not be nationally representative.

        Trends in Hospitalizations by Race/Ethnicity*


        resize iconView Larger
        *Only White, Black, and American Indian/Alaska Native groups were included in this figure. Additional race/ethnicity groups can be viewed by selecting Weekly Rates by Race/Ethnicity at the More COVID-NET Data link.

        The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are collected using a standardized case reporting form.
        More COVID-NET Data

        Deaths


        The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (347) has increased 1.9% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (340). As of June 9, a total of 596,059 COVID-19 deaths have been reported.

        596,059
        Total Deaths Reported

        347
        Current 7-Day Average*

        340
        Prior 7-Day Average

        +1.9%
        Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

        *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 7,632 historical deaths reported retroactively, 68 were reported in the current week and 294 were reported in the prior week.

        Note: In the above table, historical data with missing report dates are excluded from current and prior 7-day averages, and the percent change in the 7-day average.

        Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

        7-Day moving average

        resize iconView Larger
        More Death Data



        Recent CDC COVID-19 Publications
        1. Decreases in COVID-19 Cases, Emergency Department Visits, Hospital Admissions, and Deaths Among Older Adults Following the Introduction of COVID-19 Vaccine — United States, September 6, 2020–May 1, 2021
        2. Genomic Surveillance for SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States, December 2020–May 2021 | MMWR
        3. Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Administration of Selected Routine Childhood and Adolescent Vaccinations — 10 U.S. Jurisdictions, March–September 2020
        Recent COVID Data Tracker Updates
        https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

        Comment


        • #64


          COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


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          Interpretive Summary for July 2, 2021
          Freedom from the Virus


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          The United States has made tremendous progress in the fight against COVID-19. As of July 1, 54.6% of the U.S. population had received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. At the same time, work remains to be done to reach freedom from the virus. COVID-19 cases are increasing in some parts of the country, and on June 23, 2021, the United States surpassed 600,000 total deaths from COVID-19. Additionally, vaccination rates among people ages 18-29 remain low, and a recent CDC report showed intent to get vaccinated was lowest among adults ages 18-39. Unvaccinated people are at serious risk of getting the virus and spreading it to others.

          The emergence and spread of variants also have the potential to chip away at our nation’s progress to end this pandemic. On June 15, 2021, CDC announced classification of the SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.617.2 (Delta) as a variant of concern because it spreads more easily. The spread of the more transmissible B.1.617.2 variant combined with the U.S. population that remains unvaccinated leaves many people at risk of infection. With B.1.617.2 now spreading across the country and infecting people worldwide, it’s more important than ever that all eligible people get vaccinated as soon as possible.

          The COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States offer protection against all known variants, including the B.1.617.2 variant. Getting vaccinated will protect you and the people you love. COVID-19 vaccines are free and available for everyone ages 12 and up. They are nearly 100% effective against severe disease and death, meaning nearly every death due to COVID-19 is preventable. No matter your age, or your health history, until you’re fully vaccinated*—you are at risk of infection. By getting vaccinated and encouraging those around you to do the same, you can safely engage in activities you enjoyed prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Get vaccinated, help others get vaccinated, and use prevention measures if not fully vaccinated so we can all celebrate our freedom from the virus.

          * People are considered fully vaccinated 2 weeks after their second dose in a 2-dose series (such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines), or 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine (such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine). If you don’t meet these requirements, regardless of your age, you are not fully vaccinated. Keep taking all precautions until you are fully vaccinated.

          Note to readers: To find a vaccine provider near you, visit Vaccines.gov or your state or local public health department website. You can also text your zip code to 438829 to get 3 locations near you with vaccines in stock. If you prefer your information in Spanish, text your zip code to 822862. You can also call the National COVID-19 Vaccination Assistance Hotline at 1-800-232-0233 to get help in English, Spanish, and more than 150 other languages. It also has a TTY line to support access by hearing impaired callers. If you or someone you know is hesitant about COVID-19 vaccination, CDC has information and answers to frequently asked questions to help inform the decision.


          Reported Cases


          The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (12,514) increased 9.1% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (11,472). Compared with the highest peak on January 10, 2021 (252,905), the current 7-day average decreased 95.0%. A total of 33,496,454 COVID-19 cases have been reported as of June 30.

          33,496,454
          Total Cases Reported

          12,514
          Current 7-Day Average*

          11,472
          Prior 7-Day Average

          +9.1%
          Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

          *Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 72,725 historical cases reported retroactively, 810 were reported in the current week and 1,034 were reported in the prior week.

          Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

          7-Day moving average

          resize iconView Larger
          More Case Data



          SARS-CoV-2 Variants


          Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally and within the United States. To date, four variants have been classified as a variant of concern (VOC). Nowcast estimates* of SARS-CoV-2 cases caused by these VOCs for the two weeks ending June 19 are summarized here. Nationally, the proportion of cases attributed to B.1.1.7 (Alpha) is predicted to decrease to 47.8%; B.1.617.2 (Delta) proportion is predicted to increase to 26.1%; P.1 (Gamma) proportion is predicted to increase to 14.5%; and B.1.351 (Beta) is predicted to decrease to 0.3%. Nowcast estimates predict that B.1.1.7 (Alpha) proportions will be less than 50% in HHS regions 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, and 10. B.1.617.2 (Delta) is predicted to increase in all regions and to be more than 50% in regions 7 and 8. P.1 (Gamma) is predicted to be more than 20% in regions 1 and 10; and B.1.351 (Beta) is predicted to be below 1% in all HHS regions.

          *The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. CDC’s Nowcast is a data projection tool that helps fill this gap by generating timely estimates of variant proportions for variants that are circulating in the United States. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

          SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

          resize iconView Larger

          resize iconView Larger
          More Variants Data



          Testing


          The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests) that are positive (percent positivity) has increased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 2.0 %. The 7-day average number of tests reported for June 18-June 24 was 598,859, down 8.1% from 651,734 for the prior 7 days.

          468,067,207
          Total Tests Reported

          598,859
          7-Day Average Tests Reported

          2.0%
          7-Day Average % Positivity

          1.8%
          Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity


          +14.5%
          Change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

          COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

          resize iconView Larger
          More Testing Dataexternal icon



          Vaccinations


          The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of July 1, 328.2 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 181.3 million people, or 54.6% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 155.9 million people, or 47.0% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of July 1, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported (by date administered) to CDC per day was 334,816, a 45.3% decrease from the previous week.

          The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of July 1, 88.2% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 78.3% are fully vaccinated. Two-thirds (66.7%) of people ages 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 57.7% are fully vaccinated. For people ages 12 or older, 63.9% have received at least one dose of vaccine and 54.9% are fully vaccinated.

          328,152,304
          Vaccines Administered

          181,339,416
          People who received at least one dose

          155,884,601
          People who are fully vaccinated*

          54.6%
          Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

          47.0%
          Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

          +0.9
          Percentage point increase from last week

          +1.4
          Percentage point increase from last week

          *People who are fully vaccinated represents the number of people who have received the second dose in a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series or one dose of the single-shot J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine.

          Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


          7-Day moving average

          resize iconView Larger
          More Vaccination Data



          Hospitalizations

          New Hospital Admissions


          The current 7-day average for June 23–June 29 was 1,871. This is a 1.1% increase from the prior 7-day average (1,851) from June 16–June 22. The 7-day moving average for new admissions had been generally decreasing from April 19-June 22 but appears to have since plateaued.

          2,283,486
          Total New Admissions

          1,871
          Current 7-Day Average

          1,851
          Prior 7-Day Average

          +1.1%
          Change in 7-Day Average

          The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

          Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

          resize iconView Larger
          New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EST snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Timeseries Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the CMS Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

          More Hospital Data



          COVID-NET: Trends in Hospitalizations in Adults


          CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that across the entire COVID-19 pandemic, rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations in adults ages 18 years and older have been decreasing as the number of vaccinated adults has increased. Rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations for adults peaked at 26 per 100,000 people in early January 2021. Since then, rates in this group have fallen considerably. For the week ending June 12, 2021, the rate of COVID-19-associated hospitalization was 2.8 per 100,000 people. For this age group, this is the lowest rate of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations since March 2020.

          Rate of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations in Adults Ages 18 Years and Older


          resize iconView Larger
          The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associate­­d Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are standardized case reporting form.
          More COVID-NET Data

          Deaths


          The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (206) has decreased 11.5% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (233). As of June 30, a total of 602,401 COVID-19 deaths have been reported.

          602,401
          Total Deaths Reported

          206
          Current 7-Day Average*

          233
          Prior 7-Day Average

          -11.5%
          Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

          *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 6,181 historical deaths reported retroactively, 13 were reported in the current week and 24 were reported in the prior week.

          Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

          7-Day moving average

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          More Death Data



          Recent CDC COVID-19 Publications
          1. Symptoms of Depression, Anxiety, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Suicidal Ideation Among State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Public Health Workers During the COVID-19 Pandemic — United States, March–April 2021
          2. COVID-19 Surveillance and Investigations in Workplaces — Seattle and King County, Washington, June 15–November 15, 2020
          3. COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage Among Adults — United States, December 14, 2020–May 22, 2021
          4. COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage and Intent Among Adults Aged 18–39 Years — United States, March–May 2021
          5. Disparities in Learning Mode Access Among K–12 Students During the COVID-19 Pandemic, by Race/Ethnicity, Geography, and Grade Level — United States, September 2020–April 2021
          Recent COVID Data Tracker Updates
          • Addition of “Total Vaccines Administered” (US level only) to the Daily and Total Trends tab to allow for visualization alongside case, death, testing volume, percent positivity, daily vaccination trends and ED visits
          Science & Research
          https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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          • #65

            COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


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            Interpretive Summary for July 9, 2021
            A Needle Today Helps Keep COVID Away


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            The highly transmissible B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant continues to spread across the United States at a rapid pace. Early data suggest that B.1.617.2 now makes up more than 50% of COVID-19 cases. In some parts of the country, this percentage is even higher, especially in areas with low vaccination rates. This rapid rise is concerning and threatens the progress the United States has made toward ending the pandemic.

            We have seen the success of the U.S. vaccination program over the last 8 months. As of July 8, 2021, 183.2 million people have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, and 158.3 million are fully vaccinated.* However, we are also seeing new and emerging trends that are concerning. Cases and hospitalizations are on the rise in areas with low vaccination coverage. Data from recent weeks show that adults ages 18–49 now account for more than 40% of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations.

            Fortunately, we have safe and effective vaccines that prevent severe disease, hospitalization, and death. People who are fully vaccinated are protected from B.1.617.2. If you are not yet vaccinated, you are at risk of infection and should continue to practice prevention strategies and get vaccinated as soon as possible. Turning the corner on the pandemic, getting back to normal, and stopping the spread of B.1.617.2 requires all of us doing our part.

            * People are considered fully vaccinated 2 weeks after their second dose in a 2-dose series (such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines), or 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine (such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine). If you don’t meet these requirements, regardless of your age, you are not fully vaccinated. Keep taking all precautions until you are fully vaccinated.

            Note to readers: To find a vaccine provider near you, visit Vaccines.gov or your state or local public health department website. You can also text your zip code to 438829 to get 3 locations near you with vaccines in stock. If you prefer your information in Spanish, text your zip code to 822862. You can also call the National COVID-19 Vaccination Assistance Hotline at 1-800-232-0233 to get help in English, Spanish, and more than 150 other languages. It also has a TTY line to support access by hearing impaired callers. If you or someone you know is hesitant about COVID-19 vaccination, CDC has information and answers to frequently asked questions to help inform the decision.


            Reported Cases


            The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (14,885) increased 16.0% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (12,832). Compared with the highest peak on January 10, 2021 (251,897), the current 7-day average decreased 94.1%. A total of 33,604,986 COVID-19 cases have been reported as of July 7.

            33,604,986
            Total Cases Reported

            14,885
            Current 7-Day Average*

            12,832
            Prior 7-Day Average

            +16.0%
            Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

            *Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 72,292 historical cases reported retroactively, 697 were reported in the current week and 360 were reported in the prior week.

            Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

            7-Day moving average

            resize iconView Larger
            More Case Data



            SARS-CoV-2 Variants


            Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally and within the United States. To date, four variants have been classified as a variant of concern (VOC). Nowcast estimates* of SARS-CoV-2 cases caused by these VOCs for the two weeks ending July 3 are summarized here. Nationally, the proportion of cases attributed to B.1.617.2 (Delta) is predicted to increase to 51.7%, becoming the predominant lineage in the United States; B.1.1.7 (Alpha) proportion is predicted to decrease to 28.7%; P.1 (Gamma) proportion is predicted to decrease to 8.9%; and B.1.351 (Beta) is predicted to decrease slightly to 0.2%. Nowcast estimates predict that B.1.617.2 (Delta) will increase in all HHS regions and be more than 70% in regions 7 and 8. B.1.1.7 (Alpha) is predicted to be less than 50% in all HHS regions. P.1 (Gamma) is predicted to be more than 10% in regions 1, 4, 5, 9, and 10; and B.1.351 (Beta) is predicted to be less than or equal to 0.5% in all HHS regions.

            *The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. CDC’s Nowcast is a data projection tool that helps fill this gap by generating timely estimates of variant proportions for variants that are circulating in the United States. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

            SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

            resize iconView Larger

            resize iconView Larger
            More Variants Data



            Testing


            The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests) that are positive (percent positivity) has increased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 2.7%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for June 25 – July 01 was 558,867, down 7.9% from 606,864 for the prior 7 days.

            472,035,159
            Total Tests Reported

            558,867
            7-Day Average Tests Reported

            2.7%
            7-Day Average % Positivity

            2.0%
            Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity


            +31.9%
            Change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

            COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

            resize iconView Larger
            More Testing Dataexternal icon



            Vaccinations


            The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of July 8, 332.3 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 183.2 million people, or 55.2% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 158.3 million people, or 47.7% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of July 8, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported (by date administered) to CDC per day was 239,497, a 54.5% decrease from the previous week.

            The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of July 8, 88.5% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 78.8% are fully vaccinated. Just over two-thirds (67.3%) of people ages 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 58.5% are fully vaccinated. For people ages 12 or older, 64.5% have received at least one dose of vaccine and 55.8% are fully vaccinated.

            332,345,797
            Vaccines Administered

            183,237,046
            People who received at least one dose

            158,287,566
            People who are fully vaccinated*

            55.2%
            Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

            47.7%
            Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

            +0.6
            Percentage point increase from last week

            +0.7
            Percentage point increase from last week

            *People are considered fully vaccinated 2 weeks after their second dose in a 2-dose series (such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines), or 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine (such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine).







            Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


            7-Day moving average

            resize iconView Larger
            More Vaccination Data



            Hospitalizations

            New Hospital Admissions


            The current 7-day average for June 29–July 5 was 2,037. This is an 8.6% increase from the prior 7-day average (1,875) from June 23–June 29. The 7-day moving average for new admissions has been consistently increasing since June 28, 2021.

            2,297,764
            Total New Admissions

            2,037
            Current 7-Day Average

            1,875
            Prior 7-Day Average

            +8.6%
            Change in 7-Day Average

            The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

            Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

            resize iconView Larger
            New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EST snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Timeseries Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the CMS Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

            More Hospital Data



            COVID-NET: Trends in Hospitalizations in Adults 18–49 Years


            CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, people ages 65 years and older were the age group with the largest percentage of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations, sometimes accounting for more than half of hospitalizations. Data from May and June show that as more adults ages 65 and older became vaccinated, they accounted for fewer than 1 in 3 hospitalizations. However, data from recent weeks show that even though the number of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations continues to decline in all age groups, the proportion of hospitalized adults ages 18–49 years continues to climb and now accounts for more than 40% of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations. Since April, these younger adults now account for more hospitalizations than people 65 years and older, likely reflecting lower vaccination rates in this age group compared with older adults.

            Proportion of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations by Age Group


            resize iconView Larger
            The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associate­­d Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are standardized case reporting form.
            More COVID-NET Data

            Deaths


            The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (154) has decreased 25.2% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (205). As of July 7, a total of 603,958 COVID-19 deaths have been reported.

            603,958
            Total Deaths Reported

            154
            Current 7-Day Average*

            205
            Prior 7-Day Average

            -25.2%
            Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

            *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 6,134 historical deaths reported retroactively, 30 were reported in the current week and 10 were reported in the prior week.

            Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

            7-Day moving average

            resize iconView Larger
            More Death Data



            Recent CDC COVID-19 Publications
            1. Use of mRNA COVID-19 Vaccine After Reports of Myocarditis Among Vaccine Recipients: Update from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices — United States, June 2021
            2. Efficacy of Portable Air Cleaners and Masking for Reducing Indoor Exposure to Simulated Exhaled SARS-CoV-2 Aerosols — United States, 2021
            3. Outcomes Among Patients Referred to Outpatient Rehabilitation Clinics after COVID-19 diagnosis — United States, January 2020–March 2021
            Recent COVID Data Tracker Updates
            • A new Vaccination Equity tab displays a combined county-level view of vaccine coverage and Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) rating to visualize how each county’s vaccine coverage and estimated vulnerability level intersect
            • Static bivariate maps that illustrate cases by vaccination coverage were added to the COVID Data Tracker Communications Toolkit
            homeScience & Research
            https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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            • #66

              COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


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              Interpretive Summary for July 16, 2021
              Location, location, location


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              The conditions in which people live, learn, work, and play can affect a wide range of health risks and outcomes. Differences in the prevalence of many risks and outcomes differ by metropolitan and non-metropolitan* areas. Long-standing systemic health and social inequities have put some rural residents at increased risk of getting or having severe illness from COVID-19. The COVID-19 cumulative death rate in non-metropolitan areas has exceeded that of metropolitan areas since December 2020.

              Approximately 1 in 5 people in the United States live in rural communities. Rural areas can face different health challenges depending on where they are located. Many are considered highly vulnerable according to CDC’s Social Vulnerability Index (SVI), which includes factors such as housing, transportation, socioeconomic status, race, and ethnicity. Additionally, rural communities often have a higher proportion of residents who lack health insurance, live with a chronic disease or disability, are older than 65 years, and have limited access to health care facilities with intensive care capabilities. These factors place residents of rural communities at increased risk for COVID-19-associated illness and death.

              Because of this increased risk, vaccination disparities between urban and rural areas could further undermine efforts to reduce morbidity and mortality from COVID-19 nationally. A recent CDC report found that COVID-19 vaccination coverage was lower in rural counties compared to urban counties. Efforts are underway to raise awareness about COVID-19 vaccines, and to make vaccines more accessible to residents of rural communities. We must work together to ensure that all people, regardless of geographic location, have resources to maintain and manage their physical and mental health, including easy access to accurate information and affordable medical care so all communities can thrive.

              * Metropolitan vs. Non-Metropolitan classification type groups 6 National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) Urban-Rural classifications, where “Metro” counties include Large Central Metro, Large Fringe Metro, Medium Metro, and Small Metro and “Non-Metro” counties include Micropolitan and Non-Core (Rural). Urban/rural classification type is based on the 2013 National Center for Health Statistics Urban-Rural Classification Scheme for Counties.

              Note to readers: To find a vaccine provider near you, visit Vaccines.gov or your state or local public health department website. You can also text your zip code to 438829 to get 3 locations near you with vaccines in stock. If you prefer your information in Spanish, text your zip code to 822862. You can also call the National COVID-19 Vaccination Assistance Hotline at 1-800-232-0233 to get help in English, Spanish, and more than 150 other languages. It also has a TTY line to support access by hearing impaired callers. If you or someone you know is hesitant about COVID-19 vaccination, CDC has information and answers to frequently asked questions to help inform the decision.


              Reported Cases


              The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (26,306) increased 69.3% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (15,541). The current 7-day moving average is 89.6% lower than the peak observed on January 10, 2021 (251,880) and is 129.3% higher than the lowest value observed on June 20, 2021 (11,472). A total of 33,797,400 COVID-19 cases have been reported as of July 14.

              33,797,400
              Total Cases Reported

              26,306
              Current 7-Day Average*

              15,541
              Prior 7-Day Average

              +69.3%
              Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

              *Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 73,766 historical cases reported retroactively, 1,474 were reported in the current week and 697 were reported in the prior week.

              Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

              7-Day moving average

              resize iconView Larger
              More Case Data



              SARS-CoV-2 Variants


              Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally, including within the United States. To date, four variants have been classified as a variant of concern (VOC). Nowcast estimates* of SARS-CoV-2 cases caused by these VOCs for the two weeks ending July 3 are summarized here. Nationally, the proportion of cases attributed to B.1.617.2 (Delta) is predicted to increase to 57.6%, becoming the predominant lineage in the United States; B.1.1.7 (Alpha) proportion is predicted to decrease to 24.9%; P.1 (Gamma) proportion is predicted to decrease to 7.7%; and B.1.351 (Beta) is predicted to decrease slightly to 0.1%. Nowcast estimates predict that B.1.617.2 (Delta) will be the predominant lineage circulating in all HHS regions and be more than 75% in regions 7 and 8. B.1.1.7 (Alpha) is predicted to be less than 40% in all HHS regions. P.1 (Gamma) is predicted to be more than 10% in regions 1, 5, and 10; and B.1.351 (Beta) is predicted to be less than or equal to 0.5% in all HHS regions.

              *The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. CDC’s Nowcast is a data projection tool that helps fill this gap by generating timely estimates of variant proportions for variants that are circulating in the United States. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

              SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

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              resize iconView Larger
              More Variants Data



              Testing


              The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests) that are positive (percent positivity) has increased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 4.0%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for July 02 – July 08 was 507,379 down 11.0% from 569,778 for the prior 7 days.

              476,020,464
              Total Tests Reported

              507,379
              7-Day Average Tests Reported

              4.0%
              7-Day Average % Positivity

              2.8%
              Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity


              +40.7%
              Change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

              COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

              resize iconView Larger
              More Testing Dataexternal icon



              Vaccinations


              The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of July 15, 336.1 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 185.1 million people, or 55.8% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 160.4 million people, or 48.3% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of July 15, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported (by date administered) to CDC per day was 270,592, a 35.7% decrease from the previous week.

              The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of July 15, 88.9% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 79.3% are fully vaccinated. Just over two-thirds (67.9%) of people ages 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 59.2% are fully vaccinated. For people ages 12 or older, 65.2% have received at least one dose of vaccine and 56.5% are fully vaccinated.

              336,054,953
              Vaccines Administered

              185,135,757
              People who received at least one dose

              160,408,538
              People who are fully vaccinated*

              55.8%
              Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

              48.3%
              Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

              +0.6
              Percentage point increase from last week

              +0.6
              Percentage point increase from last week

              *People are considered fully vaccinated 2 weeks after their second dose in a 2-dose series (such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines), or 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine (such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine).







              Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


              7-Day moving average

              resize iconView Larger
              More Vaccination Data



              Hospitalizations

              New Hospital Admissions


              The current 7-day average for July 7–July 13 was 2,794. This is a 35.8% increase from the prior 7-day average (2,058) from June 30–July 6. The 7-day moving average for new admissions has consistently increased since June 25, 2021.

              2,317,457
              Total New Admissions

              2,794
              Current 7-Day Average

              2,058
              Prior 7-Day Average

              +35.8%
              Change in 7-Day Average

              The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

              Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

              resize iconView Larger
              New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EST snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Timeseries Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the CMS Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

              More Hospital Data



              Cumulative Trends in Hospitalizations in People in Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups


              CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, people from racial and ethnic minority groups have been at increased risk for COVID-19-associated hospitalizations compared to non-Hispanic White people. The cumulative hospitalization rates* for many groups demonstrate how much some communities were disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. For the week ending July 3, 2021, the cumulative rate of hospitalizations was 1129.8 per 100,000 population for American Indian/Alaska Native people, 880.4 per 100,000 population for non-Hispanic Black people, and 733.0 per 100,000 population for Hispanic people. In comparison, the cumulative rate of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations in non-Hispanic White people is 422.1 per 100,000 population.

              *While these rates are not adjusted for differences in age, additional data on age-adjusted rates by race/ethnicity for COVID-19-associated hospitalizations can be found here.

              Trends in Hospitalizations in People in Racial and Ethnic Minority Groups


              resize iconView Larger
              The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associate­­d Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are standardized case reporting form.
              More COVID-NET Data

              Deaths


              The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (211) has increased 26.3% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (167). As of July 14, a total of 605,905 COVID-19 deaths have been reported.

              605,905
              Total Deaths Reported

              211
              Current 7-Day Average*

              167
              Prior 7-Day Average

              +26.3%
              Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

              *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 6,110 historical deaths reported retroactively, 9 were reported in the current week and 1 was reported in the prior week.

              Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

              7-Day moving average

              resize iconView Larger
              More Death Data



              Recent CDC COVID-19 Publications
              1. Acceptability of Adolescent COVID-19 Vaccination Among Adolescents and Parents of Adolescents — United States, April 15–23, 2021
              2. SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.2 (Delta) Variant COVID-19 Outbreak Associated with a Gymnastics Facility — Oklahoma, April–May 2021
              Recent COVID Data Tracker Updates
              • A new Vaccination Equity tab displays a combined county-level view of vaccine coverage and Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) rating to visualize how each county’s vaccine coverage and estimated vulnerability level intersect
              • Static bivariate maps that illustrate cases by vaccination coverage were added to the COVID Data Tracker Communications Toolkit
              homeScience & Research
              https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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              • #67
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                • #68

                  COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


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                  Subscribe to the Weekly Review


                  Interpretive Summary for July 23, 2021
                  Our Shot to End the Pandemic


                  resize iconView Larger
                  The United States is once again seeing a rise in COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths. As of July 22, 35% of U.S. counties are experiencing high levels of community transmission. COVID-19 cases are on the rise in nearly 90% of U.S. jurisdictions, and we are seeing outbreaks in parts of the country that have low vaccination coverage. These worrisome trends are due, in part, to the rapid spread of the highly transmissible B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant. An increase in the number of cases will put more strain on healthcare resources and could lead to more hospitalizations and deaths.

                  An increase in COVID-19 cases also creates more opportunities for the virus to mutate, which could lead to the emergence of new variants. Variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are now responsible for all cases in the United States. The original strain is no longer detected among variants circulating throughout the country. The B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant is now the predominant variant in the United States, making up an estimated 83.2% of recent U.S. cases. The best way to slow the emergence of new variants is to reduce the spread of infection by taking measures to protect yourself, including getting a vaccine when it’s available to you.

                  COVID-19 is now a preventable disease. The COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States are safe and are effective against B.1.617.2 and other variants. If you receive a Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, you will need 2 shots to get the most protection. You should get your second shot even if you have side effects after the first shot, unless a vaccination provider or your doctor tells you not to get it. If you are only partially vaccinated, you are more likely to get infected, get sick, and spread the virus to other people. When you are fully vaccinated, you are protected against severe illness, hospitalization, and death.

                  Note to readers: To find a vaccine provider near you, visit Vaccines.gov or your state or local public health department website. You can also text your zip code to 438829 to get 3 locations near you with vaccines in stock. If you prefer your information in Spanish, text your zip code to 822862. You can also call the National COVID-19 Vaccination Assistance Hotline at 1-800-232-0233 to get help in English, Spanish, and more than 150 other languages. It also has a TTY line to support access by hearing impaired callers. If you or someone you know is hesitant about COVID-19 vaccination, CDC has information and answers to frequently asked questions to help inform the decision.


                  Reported Cases


                  The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (40,246) increased 46.7% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (27,443). The current 7-day moving average is 84.2% lower than the peak observed on January 10, 2021 (254,052), and is 250.6% higher than the lowest value observed on June 19, 2021 (11,480). A total of 34,248,054 COVID-19 cases have been reported as of July 21.

                  34,248,054
                  Total Cases Reported

                  40,246
                  Current 7-Day Average*

                  27,443
                  Prior 7-Day Average

                  +46.7%
                  Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

                  *Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 75,699 historical cases reported retroactively, 1,469 were reported in the current week and 1,474 were reported in the prior week.

                  Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

                  7-Day moving average

                  resize iconView Larger
                  More Case Data



                  SARS-CoV-2 Variants


                  Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally, including within the United States. To date, four variants have been classified as a variant of concern (VOC). Nowcast estimates* of SARS-CoV-2 cases caused by these VOCs for the two weeks ending July 17 are summarized here. Nationally, the proportion of cases attributed to B.1.617.2 (Delta) is predicted to increase to 83.2%; B.1.1.7 (Alpha) proportion is predicted to decrease to 8.3%; P.1 (Gamma) proportion is predicted to decrease to 3.3%; and B.1.351 (Beta) is predicted to decrease to below 0.1%. Nowcast estimates predict that B.1.617.2 (Delta) will continue to be the predominant lineage circulating in all HHS regions and be more than 75% in eight HHS regions. B.1.1.7 (Alpha) is predicted to be less than 20% in all HHS regions. P.1 (Gamma) is predicted to be less than 7% in all HHS regions; and B.1.351 (Beta) is predicted to be less than or equal to 0.1% in all HHS regions.

                  *The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. CDC’s Nowcast is a data projection tool that helps fill this gap by generating timely estimates of variant proportions for variants that are circulating in the United States. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

                  SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

                  resize iconView Larger

                  resize iconView Larger
                  More Variants Data



                  Testing


                  The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests) that are positive (percent positivity) has increased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 5.8%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for July 09 – July 15 was 599,054 up 15.9% from 516,701 for the prior 7 days.

                  480,535,511
                  Total Tests Reported

                  599,054
                  7-Day Average Tests Reported

                  5.8%
                  7-Day Average % Positivity

                  4.2%
                  Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity


                  +36.0%
                  Change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                  COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

                  resize iconView Larger
                  More Testing Dataexternal icon



                  Vaccinations


                  The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of July 22, 339.8 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 187.2 million people, or 56.4% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 162.2 million people, or 48.8% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of July 22, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported (by date administered) to CDC per day was 291,565, a 35.2% decrease from the previous week.

                  The COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of July 22, 89.2% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 79.6% are fully vaccinated. Just over two-thirds (68.6%) of people ages 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 59.7% are fully vaccinated. For people ages 12 or older, 65.9% have received at least one dose of vaccine and 57.1% are fully vaccinated.

                  339,763,765
                  Vaccines Administered

                  187,216,168
                  People who received at least one dose

                  162,174,165
                  People who are fully vaccinated*

                  56.4%
                  Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

                  48.8%
                  Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

                  +0.6
                  Percentage point increase from last week

                  +0.5
                  Percentage point increase from last week

                  *People are considered fully vaccinated 2 weeks after their second dose in a 2-dose series (such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines), or 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine (such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine).







                  Daily Change in Number of COVID-19 Vaccinations in the United States Reported to CDC


                  7-Day moving average

                  resize iconView Larger
                  More Vaccination Data



                  Hospitalizations

                  New Hospital Admissions


                  The current 7-day average for July 13–July 19 was 3,521. This is a 32.2% increase from the prior 7-day average (2,663) from July 6–July 12. The 7-day moving average for new admissions has consistently increased since June 25, 2021.

                  2,338,869
                  Total New Admissions

                  3,521
                  Current 7-Day Average

                  2,663
                  Prior 7-Day Average

                  +32.2%
                  Change in 7-Day Average

                  The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

                  Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

                  resize iconView Larger
                  New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EST snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Timeseries Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the CMS Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                  More Hospital Data



                  COVID-NET: Trends in Hospitalizations in Adults Ages 65 Years and Older


                  CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, people ages 65 years and older were the age group with the highest rates of hospitalization among all adults. While hospitalization rates in this age group had been decreasing over several months, preliminary data from the past 3 weeks show that rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations are again rising in adults ages 65 years and older. These are the first increases in rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations seen in this age group since April 2021.

                  Trends in Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations in Adults Ages 65 Years and Older


                  resize iconView Larger
                  The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associate­­d Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are standardized case reporting form.
                  More COVID-NET Data

                  Deaths


                  The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (223) has increased 9.3% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (204). As of July 21, a total of 607,684 COVID-19 deaths have been reported.

                  607,684
                  Total Deaths Reported

                  223
                  Current 7-Day Average*

                  204
                  Prior 7-Day Average

                  +9.3%
                  Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

                  *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 6,125 historical deaths reported retroactively, 15 were reported in the current week and 9 were reported in the prior week.

                  Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

                  7-Day moving average

                  resize iconView Larger
                  More Death Data



                  Recent CDC COVID-19 Publications
                  1. COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage Among Insured Persons Aged ≥16 Years, by Race/Ethnicity and Other Selected Characteristics — Eight Integrated Health Care Organizations, United States, December 14, 2020–May 15, 2021
                  2. COVID-19 Vaccine Administration, by Race and Ethnicity — North Carolina, December 14, 2020–April 6, 2021
                  3. Changes in Influenza and Other Respiratory Virus Activity During the COVID-19 Pandemic — United States, 2020–2021
                  Recent COVID Data Tracker UpdateshomeScience & Research
                  https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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                  • #69

                    COVID Data Tracker Weekly Review


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                    Subscribe to the Weekly Review


                    Interpretive Summary for July 30, 2021
                    Don’t Run Down the Shot Clock


                    COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths are once again increasing in nearly all states, fueled by the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, which is much more contagious than past versions of the virus. The highest spread of cases and severe outcomes is happening in places with low vaccination rates. Although COVID-19 vaccination is the most effective prevention measure, vaccination rates across the United States have varied.

                    COVID-19 vaccines are very effective, but no vaccine is perfect. In some instances, fully vaccinated people will get COVID-19 and may be contagious. These are called “vaccine breakthrough cases.” A new CDC study finds that B.1.617.2 (Delta) can lead to breakthrough infections. This means that while vaccinated people are much less likely to get sick, it will still happen in some cases. As the number of people who are vaccinated goes up, the number of breakthrough cases is also expected to increase, even as the vaccines remain highly effective.

                    United States Levels of Community Transmission by County as of July 27, 2021

                    resize iconView Larger
                    Vaccines help protect people from getting COVID-19 or from getting severely ill from it. Unvaccinated people should get vaccinated and continue masking. CDC also recommends that fully vaccinated people wear masks in public indoor settings in areas of substantial or high transmission. With the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant rapidly spreading throughout the country, this is more urgent than ever. To find a vaccine provider near you, visit Vaccines.gov or your state or local public health department website. If you or someone you know is hesitant about COVID-19 vaccination, CDC has information and answers to frequently asked questions to help them inform their decision.

                    Note to readers: On July 27, 2021, CDC announced updated Guidance for COVID-19 Prevention Strategies. Among strategies to prevent COVID-19, CDC recommends all unvaccinated people wear masks in public indoor settings. Based on emerging evidence of the B.1.617.2 (Delta) variant, CDC also recommends that fully vaccinated people wear masks in public indoor settings in areas of substantial or high transmission. To see the level of community transmission in your county, visit COVID Data Tracker.


                    Reported Cases


                    The current 7-day moving average of daily new cases (66,606) increased 64.1% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (40,597). The current 7-day moving average is 73.8% lower than the peak observed on January 10, 2021 (254,063) and is 480.1% higher than the lowest value observed on June 19, 2021 (11,483). A total of 34,722,631 COVID-19 cases have been reported as of July 28.

                    34,722,631
                    Total Cases Reported

                    66,606
                    Current 7-Day Average*

                    40,597
                    Prior 7-Day Average

                    +64.1%
                    Change in 7-Day Average since Prior Week

                    *Historical cases are excluded from daily new cases and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset for the applicable date. Of 77,785 historical cases reported retroactively, 2,086 were reported in the current week and 1,469 were reported in the prior week.

                    Daily Trends in COVID-19 Cases in the United States Reported to CDC

                    7-Day moving average

                    resize iconView Larger
                    More Case Data



                    SARS-CoV-2 Variants


                    Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally, including within the United States. Currently, four variants are classified as a variant of concern (VOC). Nowcast estimates* of SARS-CoV-2 cases caused by these VOCs for the two weeks ending July 17 are summarized here. Nationally, the proportion of cases attributed to B.1.617.2 (Delta) is predicted to increase to 82.2%; B.1.1.7 (Alpha) proportion is predicted to decrease to 9.0%; P.1 (Gamma) proportion is predicted to decrease to 3.8%; and B.1.351 (Beta) is predicted to remain steady at 0.1%. Nowcast estimates predict that B.1.617.2 (Delta) will continue to be the predominant lineage circulating in all HHS regions and be more than 70% in nine HHS regions. B.1.1.7 (Alpha) is predicted to be less than or equal to 21% in all HHS regions. P.1 (Gamma) is predicted to be less than 9% in all HHS regions; and B.1.351 (Beta) is predicted to be less than or equal to 0.2% in all HHS regions.

                    *The median time from specimen collection to sequence data reporting is about 3 weeks. As a result, weighted estimates for the most recent few weeks may be unstable or unavailable. CDC’s Nowcast is a data projection tool that helps fill this gap by generating timely estimates of variant proportions for variants that are circulating in the United States. View Nowcast estimates on CDC’s COVID Data Tracker website on the Variant Proportions page.

                    SARS-CoV-2 Variants Circulating in the United States

                    resize iconView Larger

                    resize iconView Larger
                    More Variants Data



                    Testing


                    The percentage of COVID-19 NAATs (nucleic acid amplification tests) that are positive (percent positivity) has increased from the previous week. The 7-day average of percent positivity from tests is now 7.8%. The 7-day average number of tests reported for July 16 – Jul 22 was 698,611 up 14.5% from 610,004 for the prior 7 days.

                    486,000,511
                    Total Tests Reported

                    698,611
                    7-Day Average Tests Reported

                    7.8%
                    7-Day Average % Positivity

                    6.0%
                    Previous 7-Day Average % Positivity


                    +31.0%
                    Change in 7-Day Average % Positivity since Prior Week

                    COVID-19 NAAT Laboratory Test 7-day Percent Positivity by State/Territory

                    resize iconView Larger
                    More Testing Dataexternal icon



                    Vaccinations


                    The U.S. COVID-19 Vaccination Program began December 14, 2020. As of July 29, 344.1 million vaccine doses have been administered. Overall, about 189.9 million people, or 57.2% of the total U.S. population, have received at least one dose of vaccine. About 163.9 million people, or 49.4% of the total U.S. population, have been fully vaccinated.* As of July 29, the 7-day average number of administered vaccine doses reported (by date of CDC report) to CDC per day was 615,404, a 16.15% increase from the previous week.

                    CDC’s COVID Data Tracker Vaccination Demographic Trends tab shows vaccination trends by age group. As of July 29, 89.7% of people ages 65 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 79.9% are fully vaccinated. Over two-thirds (69.4%) of people ages 18 or older have received at least one dose of vaccine and 60.3% are fully vaccinated. For people ages 12 or older, 66.9% have received at least one dose of vaccine and 57.7% are fully vaccinated.

                    344,071,595
                    Vaccines Administered

                    189,945,907
                    People who received at least one dose

                    163,868,916
                    People who are fully vaccinated*

                    57.2%
                    Percentage of the US population that has received at least one dose

                    49.4%
                    Percentage of the US population that has been fully vaccinated*

                    +0.8
                    Percentage point increase from last week

                    +0.6
                    Percentage point increase from last week

                    *People are considered fully vaccinated 2 weeks after their second dose in a 2-dose series (such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines), or 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine (such as Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine).







                    Daily Change in the Total Number of Administered Doses Reported to CDC by the date of CDC Report, United States



                    7-Day moving average

                    resize iconView Larger
                    More Vaccination Data



                    Hospitalizations

                    New Hospital Admissions


                    The current 7-day average for July 21–July 27 was 5,475. This is a 46.3% increase from the prior 7-day average (3,742) from July 14–July 20. The 7-day moving average for new admissions has consistently increased since June 25, 2021.

                    2,381,644
                    Total New Admissions

                    5,475
                    Current 7-Day Average

                    3,742
                    Prior 7-Day Average

                    +46.3%
                    Change in 7-Day Average

                    The start of consistent reporting of hospital admissions data was August 1, 2020.

                    Daily Trends in Number of New COVID-19 Hospital Admissions in the United States

                    resize iconView Larger
                    New admissions are pulled from a 10 am EST snapshot of the HHS Unified Hospital Timeseries Dataset. Due to potential reporting delays, data from the most recent 7 days, as noted in the figure above with the grey bar, should be interpreted with caution. Small shifts in historic data may also occur due to changes in the CMS Provider of Services file, which is used to identify the cohort of included hospitals.

                    More Hospital Data



                    COVID-NET: Trends in Hospitalizations in Adults Ages 18–49 Years


                    CDC’s Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that hospitalization rates are increasing in younger adults. While adults ages 65 years and older are most at-risk, younger adults are also at risk for COVID-19-associated hospitalizations. Rates of hospitalization remain low when compared to previous months of the pandemic, but preliminary data show that weekly rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations have increased significantly for adults ages 18 to 49 years. Compared to June 26, 2021, weekly rates in adults ages 18–49 years for the week ending July 10, 2021 have increased by nearly 40%. These are the first increases in rates of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations seen in this age group since April 2021.

                    Trends in Rates of COVID-19-Associated Hospitalizations in Adults Ages 18–49 Years


                    resize iconView Larger
                    The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)-Associate¬¬d Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) is an additional source for hospitalization data collected through a network of more than 250 acute-care hospitals in 14 states (representing ~10% of the U.S. population). Detailed data on patient demographics, including race/ethnicity, underlying medical conditions, medical interventions, and clinical outcomes, are standardized case reporting form.
                    More COVID-NET Data

                    Deaths


                    The current 7-day moving average of new deaths (296) has increased 33.3% compared with the previous 7-day moving average (222). The current 7-day moving average is 91.8% lower than the peak observed on January 13, 2021 (3,625) and is 77.1% higher than the lowest value observed on July 10, 2021 (167). As of July 28, a total of 609,853 COVID-19 deaths have been reported.

                    609,853
                    Total Deaths Reported

                    296
                    Current 7-Day Average*

                    222
                    Prior 7-Day Average

                    +33.3%
                    Change in 7-Day Average Since Prior Week

                    *Historical deaths are excluded from the daily new deaths and 7-day average calculations until they are incorporated into the dataset by their applicable date. Of 6,143 historical deaths reported retroactively, 26 were reported in the current week and 8 were reported in the prior week.

                    Daily Trends in Number of COVID-19 Deaths in the United States Reported to CDC

                    7-Day moving average

                    resize iconView Larger
                    More Death Data



                    Recent CDC COVID-19 Publications
                    1. Guidance for Implementing COVID-19 Prevention Strategies in the Context of Varying Community Transmission Levels and Vaccination Coverage
                    2. SARS-CoV-2 Infection in Public School District Employees Following a District-Wide Vaccination Program — Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, March 21–April 23, 2021
                    3. Disparities in COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage Among Health Care Personnel Working in Long-Term Care Facilities, by Job Category, National Healthcare Safety Network — United States, March 2021
                    4. Outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 Infections, including COVID-19 Vaccine Breakthrough Infections, Associated with Large Public Gatherings — Barnstable County, Massachusetts, July 2021

                    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...iew/index.html

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