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  • Recognizing and treating radiation sickness

    http://www.ehow.com/how_2070353_trea...-sickness.html

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    <!-- google_ad_section_start() -->How to Treat Radiation Sickness

    <!-- google_ad_section_end() --><CITE>By an eHow Contributor </CITE>
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    <!-- google_ad_section_start() -->There is no cure for radiation sickness, which is caused by body tissue exposed to radioactive substances. The symptoms are treated on a case by case basis since the degree of sickness and the symptoms vary from person to person. The effects cannot be reversed, but if they're treated in a timely manner the damage may be contained.
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    Difficulty: Challenging
    Instructions


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    1. 1
      Receive treatment immediately if you have been exposed to radioactive substances. In mild cases the exposure may result in nausea, diarrhea, vomiting and weakness. These symptoms can be treated with specific medications designed to reduce these complaints. Blood transfusions may be needed to treat anemia and antibiotics to reduce the threat of infections.
    2. 2
      Receive a bone marrow transplant if you have experienced a massive does of radiation. Death is usually immediate, but some people have survived with successful transplant surgery. The drug filgrastim is used in patients after chemotherapy to stimulate white blood cells and may be helpful in repairing damage to bone marrow.
    3. 3
      Take potassium iodide orally either before or after exposure, although it works best if taken before exposure. The non-radioactive potassium salts take up residence in the thyroid gland, leaving only one percent of space for contamination by radioactive iodines. If exposure is limited to hands and feet and no vital organs have been contaminated the danger is greatly reduced and radiation poisoning will not occur.
    4. 4
      Be aware of any new treatments or medications that become available. Neumune, used as a counteractive to radiation poisoning, is now going through phase I trials. FDA approved Radiogardase, pentetate calcium trisodium and pentetate zinc trisodium are drugs used to rid the body of radioactive substances.
    5. 5
      Return to your doctor for exams regularly even if you've recovered from the initial symptoms of radioactive poisoning. Over the months and years following exposure, there's always a danger of related health problems and delayed effects.
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    Radiation Treatmentswww.CancerCenter.com
    Chat w/a Cancer Info Expert About Radiation Treatment Options





    Read more: How to Treat Radiation Sickness | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_2070353_trea...#ixzz1Gb3AhklL
    Please do not ask me for medical advice, I am not a medical doctor.

    Avatar is a painting by Alan Pollack, titled, "Plague". I'm sure it was an accident that the plague girl happened to look almost like my twin.
    Thank you,
    Shannon Bennett

  • #2
    Re: Recognizing and treating radiation sickness

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/rad...ents-and-drugs


    Treatments and drugs

    By Mayo Clinic staff
    The treatment goals for radiation sickness are to prevent further radioactive contamination, treat damaged organs, reduce symptoms and manage pain.
    Decontamination
    Decontamination is the removal of as much external radioactive particles as possible. Removing clothing and shoes eliminates about 90 percent of external contamination. Gently washing with water and soap removes additional radiation particles from the skin.
    Decontamination prevents further distribution of radioactive materials and lowers the risk of internal contamination from inhalation, ingestion or open wounds.
    Treatment for damaged bone marrow
    A protein called granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, which promotes the growth of white blood cells, may counter the effect of radiation sickness on bone marrow. Treatment with this protein-based medication, which includes filgrastim (Neupogen) and pegfilgrastim (Neulasta), may increase white blood cell production and help prevent subsequent infections.
    If you have severe damage to bone marrow, you may also receive transfusions of red blood cells or blood platelets.
    Treatment for internal contamination
    Some treatments may reduce damage to internal organs caused by radioactive particles. Medical personnel would use these treatments only if you've been exposed to a specific type of radiation. These treatments include the following:
    • Potassium iodide. This is a nonradioactive form of iodine. Because iodine is essential for proper thyroid function, the thyroid becomes a "destination" for iodine in the body. If you have internal contamination with radioactive iodine (radioiodine), your thyroid will absorb radioiodine just as it would other forms of iodine. Treatment with potassium iodide may fill "vacancies" in the thyroid and prevent absorption of radioiodine. The radioiodine is eventually cleared from the body in urine.
    • Prussian blue. This type of dye binds to particles of radioactive elements known as cesium and thallium. The radioactive particles are then excreted in feces. This treatment speeds up the elimination of the radioactive particles and reduces the amount of radiation cells may absorb.
    • Diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). This substance binds to metals. DTPA binds to particles of the radioactive elements plutonium, americium and curium. The radioactive particles pass out of the body in urine, thereby reducing the amount of radiation absorbed.
    Supportive treatment
    If you have radiation sickness, you may receive additional medications or interventions to treat:
    • Bacterial infections
    • Headache
    • Fever
    • Diarrhea
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Dehydration
    End-of-life care
    A person who has absorbed large doses of radiation (6 Gy or greater) has little chance of recovery. Depending on the severity of illness, death can occur within two days or two weeks. People with a lethal radiation dose will receive medications to control pain, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. They may also benefit from psychological or pastoral care.
    Please do not ask me for medical advice, I am not a medical doctor.

    Avatar is a painting by Alan Pollack, titled, "Plague". I'm sure it was an accident that the plague girl happened to look almost like my twin.
    Thank you,
    Shannon Bennett

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Recognizing and treating radiation sickness

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/rad...CTION=symptoms

      Symptoms

      By Mayo Clinic staff
      The severity of signs and symptoms of radiation sickness depends on how much radiation you've absorbed. How much you absorb depends on the strength of the radiated energy and the distance between you and the source of radiation.
      Absorbed dose and duration of exposure
      The absorbed dose of radiation is measured in a unit called a gray (Gy). Diagnostic tests that use radiation, such as an X-ray, result in a small dose of radiation — typically well below 0.1 Gy, focused on a few organs or small amount of tissue.
      Signs and symptoms of radiation sickness usually appear when the entire body receives an absorbed dose of at least 1 Gy. Doses greater than 6 Gy to the whole body are generally not treatable and usually lead to death within two days to two weeks, depending on the dose and duration of the exposure.
      Initial signs and symptoms
      The initial signs and symptoms of treatable radiation sickness are usually nausea and vomiting. The amount of time between exposure and when these symptoms develop is an indicator of how much radiation a person has absorbed.
      After the first round of signs and symptoms, a person with radiation sickness may have a brief period with no apparent illness, followed by the onset of new, more serious symptoms.
      In general, the greater your radiation exposure, the more rapid and more severe your symptoms will be.
      <TABLE class=content border=1 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=3><TBODY><TR><TH colSpan=5>Early symptoms of radiation sickness </TH></TR><TR class=bodyrowg><TD> </TD><TD width="20&#37;">Mild exposure (1-2 Gy) </TD><TD width="20%">Moderate exposure (2-6 Gy) </TD><TD width="20%">Severe exposure (6-8 Gy) </TD><TD width="20%">Very severe exposure (8-10 Gy or higher) </TD></TR><TR><TD>Nausea and vomiting </TD><TD>Within 6 hours </TD><TD>Within 2 hours </TD><TD>Within 1 hour </TD><TD>Within 10 minutes </TD></TR><TR><TD>Diarrhea </TD><TD>-- </TD><TD>Within 8 hours </TD><TD>Within 3 hours </TD><TD>Within 1 hour </TD></TR><TR><TD>Headache </TD><TD>-- </TD><TD>Within 24 hours </TD><TD>Within 4 hours </TD><TD>Within 2 hours </TD></TR><TR><TD>Fever </TD><TD>-- </TD><TD>Within 3 hours </TD><TD>Within 1 hour </TD><TD>Within 1 hour </TD></TR><TR><TH colSpan=5>Later symptoms of radiation sickness </TH></TR><TR><TD>Dizziness and disorientation</TD><TD>-- </TD><TD>--</TD><TD>Within 1 week</TD><TD>Immediate </TD></TR><TR><TD>Weakness, fatigue </TD><TD>Within 4 weeks</TD><TD>Within 1-4 weeks</TD><TD>Within 1 week</TD><TD>Immediate </TD></TR><TR><TD>Hair loss, bloody vomit and stools, infections, poor wound healing, low blood pressure </TD><TD>-- </TD><TD>Within 1-4 weeks </TD><TD>Within 1 week </TD><TD>Immediate</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
      Source: Adapted from "Bushberg JT. Radiation exposure and contamination. The Merck Manuals: The Merck Manual for Healthcare Professionals" and "Upton AC. Radiation injury. In: Goldman L, et al., eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2007."
      When to see a doctor
      An accident or attack that causes radiation sickness would no doubt cause a lot of attention and public concern. If an event occurs, monitor radio, television or online reports to learn about emergency instructions for your area.
      If you know you've been exposed to radiation, seek emergency medical care.
      Causes Definition
      <!--googleoff: index-->References
      1. Upton AC. Radiation injury. In: Goldman L, et al., eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2007. http://www.mdconsult.com/das/book/bo...9--cesec10_713. Accessed March 23, 2010.
      2. Colwell CB, et al. Radiation injuries. In: Marx JA, et al., eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 6th ed. St. Louis, Mo.: Mosby; 2006. http://www.mdconsult.com/book/player...&sid=972411702. Accessed March 23, 2010.
      3. Siegel D. Preparation for terrorist threats: Radiation injury. Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine. 2009;10:136.
      4. Bushberg JT. Radiation exposure and contamination. The Merck Manuals: The Merck Manual for Healthcare Professionals. http://merck.com/mmpe/sec21/ch317/ch317a.html#CHDCIEIA. Accessed March 23, 2010.
      5. Ferri FF, et al. Radiation exposure. In: Ferri FF. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2010. St. Louis, Mo.: Mosby; 2009. http://www.mdconsult.com/das/book/bo...7--s0170_11313. Accessed March 23, 2010.
      6. Vetter RJ (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 3, 2010.


      <!--googleon: index-->DS00432
      May 8, 2010
      &#169; 1998-2011 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved. A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. "Mayo," "Mayo Clinic," "MayoClinic.com," "EmbodyHealth," "Enhance your life," and the triple-shield Mayo Clinic logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.
      Please do not ask me for medical advice, I am not a medical doctor.

      Avatar is a painting by Alan Pollack, titled, "Plague". I'm sure it was an accident that the plague girl happened to look almost like my twin.
      Thank you,
      Shannon Bennett

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Recognizing and treating radiation sickness

        News Hub: Doctor on Japan Nuclear Radiation Risks <small>3/14/2011 5:13:15 PM</small>

        New York-Presbyterian Hospital's Radiation Oncologist-in-Chief Clifford Chao helps explain the health risks and symptoms that could result from a meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Northern Japan.


        http://online.wsj.com/video-center

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