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  • Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection in Wales

    HPA Press Statement
    25 May 2007
    Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection
    The Health Protection Agency is providing expert support and advice to the National Public Health Service for Wales after an H7N2 avian influenza infection was found in birds on a small farm in north Wales. The Agency has carried out tests on specimens from nine people associated with the incident; seven are from Wales and two were from north west England.
    Four of the test results were positive - two of these were from Wales and two were from north west England.The remaining five test results came back as negative. However because these five cases were associated with the birds and had a compatible illness, they are being treated as a precaution.
    H7N2 is a low pathogenic strain of avian flu. It is different to the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain currently circulating in South East Asia, and in Europe last year. In almost all human cases to date, H7N2 infection has generally been associated with a mild disease. The risk to the general public is considered to be very low.
    Pat Troop, Chief Executive of the Health Protection Agency said:-
    “As a routine precaution, we have tested those who were associated with the infected or dead birds and reported flu-like symptoms. We tested samples from nine people in our laboratories and confirmed infection in four.
    “These test results confirm that human infection with the avian flu virus has occurred. The cases so far have been associated with the infected birds. “It is important to remember that H7N2 avian flu remains largely a disease of birds.
    The virus does not transmit easily to humans. Worldwide, almost all human H7N2 infections documented so far, including those associated with this most recent incident, have been associated with infected poultry.
    Three of the nine individuals were initially hospitalised. They have all, however, now been discharged.
    The National Public Health Service for Wales and HPA North West is tracing and following up all close contacts of the individuals who have been ill as a precautionary measure.
    Notes to Editors:
    1. For further information please contact the HPA Press Office on 0208 327 7097/7098/6055. Out of hours please call 020 8200 44002.
    2. For further information about avian flu go to: http://www.hpa.org.uk/infections/topics_az/influenza/avian/default.htm
    3. A Q&A information sheet prepared by The National Public Health Service for Wales and is available to download from the link: Q&A Avian Influenza in North Wales.
    Situation updates are also available from the Welsh Assembly Government website at: http://new.wales.gov.uk/news/presreleasearchive/1469510/?lang=en.

    A map detailing the Avian Influenza Restricted Zone declared in accordance with Article 55 of the Avian Influenza and Influenza of Avian Origin in Mammals (Wales) (No.2) Order 2006 is also given on the Welsh Assembly website at: Welsh Assembly Government Avian Influenza Restricted Zone
    4. As part of the tracing exercise, and epidemiological investigation, Defra would like to hear from anyone, who has not already been contacted by Animal Health officials, who has:
    • Purchased from or supplied to Chelford Market in Cheshire on Monday 7 May 2007 or
    • Any poultry keeper who visited Chelford Market on this date whose birds have subsequently become ill.
    • These people should contact their local Animal Health Office (details to be found at www.defra.gov.uk/animalhealth) or from the Defra helpline 08459 33 55 77 (open between 9am - 5pm 7 days a week).
    According to Defra all bird keepers throughout the UK should continue their efforts to maintain high levels of biosecurity and maintain vigilance by continuing to monitor their birds for signs of disease. If you are concerned about the health of your birds you should seek the advice of your veterinary surgeon, if you suspect that your birds have avian influenza you should report it to your Local Animal Health Office.
    There is absolutely no reason for anyone to abandon their birds (or any other pet) because of any fears or worries of infection from avian influenza. This is an offence under the abandonment of Animals Act. The welfare of birds is seriously compromised when they are abandoned and they are at risk from starvation or accident and are more vulnerable to disease.

    All those persons wishing to seek general information about animal health should not call the local Animal Health office, but should call the Defra Helpline on 08459 33 55 77, or visit the Defra website at www.defra.gov.uk.
    Further biosecurity guidance can be found on the Avian Influenza pages on the Defra website at: www.defra.gov.uk

    http://www.hpa.org.uk/hpa/news/artic...n_flu_H7N2.htm

  • #2
    Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

    I started a new thread with the official press reelase on the four confirmed cases, since some media are now dicussing 2 confirmed cases, which I thought was rather odd since this official report was dated May 25.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

      Avian influenza (bird flu) confirmed in North Wales<!-- #EndEditable --><!--End of title--><!--Central Content Area text--><!-- #BeginEditable "body" -->
      Chief veterinary officer for Wales Dr Christianne Glossop has confirmed a case of avian influenza (bird flu) on a farm in North Wales.
      The strain identified is H7N2 low pathogenic avian influenza. The strain is different to the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain currently circulating in South East Asia, and in Europe last year.
      Great Britain and Wales contingency plans have been activated and the UK’s chief vet Debby Reynolds, has formally confirmed the presence of the virus in the UK.
      The farm has been placed under restriction and a 1km restriction zone has been placed around it. The 30 remaining birds on the farm are being slaughtered today.
      The source of infection is being investigated.
      Poultry keepers are being reminded to report any suspicious signs of a notifiable avian disease to their local Animal Health Divisional Office. Members of the National Poultry Register will receive updates by text.
      Avian influenza is a disease of birds. It is very rare for humans to become infected and even then it is normally associated with close contact with infected birds. The risk to the health of the general public is very low.
      Routine tests are being carried out on people who work on the farm and anybody else who has been in close contact.

      http://www.defra.gov.uk/news/latest/...nimal-0524.htm

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

        Confirmation of avian influenza in North Wales


        The Chief Veterinary Officer for Wales, Dr Christianne Glossop, confirmed a case of avian influenza in birds in North Wales on 24 May 2007. The strain identified is H7N2 low pathogenic avian influenza. The strain is different to the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain currently circulating in South East Asia, and in Europe last year.
        GB and Wales contingency plans have been activated. In line with this, the farm has been placed under restriction and a 1km restriction zone has been placed around the infected premises. Within this zone, birds and bird products cannot be moved, bird gatherings can only take place under licence from Animal Health, we are advising poultry keepers to observe strict biosecurity measures.
        The 30 remaining birds on the farm are being slaughtered today.
        The source of infection is being investigated.
        We would like to remind poultry keepers to report any suspicious signs of a notifiable avian disease to their local Animal Health Divisional Office. These numbers are below.
        Members of the National Poultry Register will receive updates by text.
        Avian influenza is a disease of birds. It is very rare for humans to become infected and even then it is normally associated with close contact with infected birds. The risk to the health of the general public is very low.
        Routine tests are being carried out on people who work on the farm and anybody else who has been in close contact.
        The small number of people who have potentially come into contact is very low. There are no on-going risks to the public but if people have concerns NHS Direct is always available for general health advice. The NHS Direct number is 0845 46 47.
        Further information is available from www.wales.gov.uk/avianflu
        Dr Christianne Glossop speaking at the press conference on 24 May 2007 (mp3, 2.3Mb)
        Animal Health Divisional Office numbers:
        Cardiff 029 20768500
        Caernarfon 01286 674144
        Carmarthen 01267 245400

        Notes
        All avian influenzas (H1 to H16) can be low pathogenic but only H5 and H7 have been shown to have the potential to become highly pathogenic.
        The 1km zone restricts the movement of poultry, poultry products and eggs, additional biosecurity measures must be taken and gatherings can only take place under licence from Animal Health.
        Poultry keepers within the zone will not be asked to house their birds, however good biosecurity measures are encouraged.
        The Food Standards Agency advises that avian flu does not pose a food safety risk for UK consumers. The risk of people getting avian influenza from eating poultry meat and eggs is low. Further information is available on the Food Standards Agency website at www.food.gov.uk

        http://new.wales.gov.uk/news/presrel...69510/?lang=en

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

          Dr Glossop said,
          We are testing birds at the farm because of its link with Chelford Market on 7 May 2007. There is a police presence currently at the farm, to ensure no unnecessary access to the premises. A decision on any further action required regarding birds on the farm will be taken on the basis of the test results.
          As part of the tracing exercise, I repeat my request for anyone, who has not already been contacted by Animal Health officials, and who has purchased from or supplied to Chelford Market in Cheshire on Monday 7 May 2007 or any poultry keeper who visited Chelford Market on this date whose birds have subsequently become ill, to contact their local Animal Health Office or the Defra helpline.
          All bird keepers in Wales should continue their efforts to maintain high levels of biosecurity and maintain vigilance by continuing to monitor their birds for signs of disease. If you are concerned about the health of your birds you should seek the advice of your veterinary surgeon, if you suspect that your birds have avian influenza you should report it to your Local Animal Health Office.
          The Defra helpline number is 08459 33 55 77. (Open between 9am - 5pm 7 days a week).
          26 May 2007 14:50

          http://new.wales.gov.uk/news/presrel...26may/?lang=en

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

            Originally posted by niman View Post
            I started a new thread with the official press reelase on the four confirmed cases, since some media are now dicussing 2 confirmed cases, which I thought was rather odd since this official report was dated May 25.
            Good idea.

            Henry do you want to explain why we are following this so closely even though it is not H5N1 and appears not to be a strain with a high case fatality rate?
            "May the long time sun
            Shine upon you,
            All love surround you,
            And the pure light within you
            Guide your way on."

            "Where your talents and the needs of the world cross, lies your calling."
            Aristotle

            “In a gentle way, you can shake the world.”
            Mohandas Gandhi

            Be the light that is within.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

              Pupils offered bird flu drug <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE class=headerTable cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=* border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>May 28 2007

              </TD></TR><TR><TD>
              </TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=2>icWales
              </TD></TR></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=400 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD colSpan=3> </TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=3>
              SCHOOL pupils and staff are being offered anti-flu drugs after a child became infected in the bird flu outbreak in north Wales, health chiefs said today.
              A dozen schoolchildren aged nine and 10 and two teachers are being given Tamiflu treatments as a precaution after it emerged they had spent time with the youngster.
              The child, who lives close to the farm in Corwen where the H7N2 strain was first discovered, is responding to treatment at home.
              A statement released by the National Public Health Service for Wales (NPHS) said staff and pupils from Years 5 and 6 at Ysgol Henllan school in Denbighshire were at a “very slight” risk of infection.
              A total of 12 people are thought to have been infected with the flu but none are seriously ill.

              Story continues
              ADVERTISEMENT

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              This most recent variety of avian flu is less aggressive than the H5N1 strain.

              Health officials could not rule out the disease had spread from person-to-person but stressed inquiries were ongoing.

              A NPHS spokesman said: “Person to person spread would be very unusual but limited spread of this type has been seen in elsewhere in the past in some cases of bird flu.”

              Chickens from a second farm in the Llyn Peninsula were being tested and restrictions were imposed on movement of people and animals from the property.

              A total of 30 chicken from the smallholding in Corwen have now been slaughtered after 15 birds died.

              They were 22-week-old Rhode Island Red chickens bought by the farm two weeks ago from Chelford Market in Cheshire.

              The NPHS statement said: “As a precaution, pupils in Years 5 and 6 at Ysgol Henllan, Denbighshire, are being offered Tamiflu to protect them from the very slight risk of infection with the H7 flu virus.

              “This precautionary action has been taken because a child in Year 5, linked to the smallholding near Corwen, is believed to have avian flu.

              “Twelve children and two teachers have been identified as being in prolonged close contact with the child in the classroom on the days when there was a very small risk of the child being infectious.

              “The parents of each child are being contacted by staff at the NPHS.

              Only these children and staff have been offered Tamiflu, an antiviral medication which reduces the severity of any impact of the infection.”

              Dr Brendan Mason, a consultant epidemiologist with the National Public Health Service for Wales, said, “This is an unusual step for us to take because the risk of the infection being passed from the child to other pupils is so small.

              However, this particular virus usually only affects birds and is relatively unknown in humans. Its clinical characteristics have not been fully defined.

              “It is very rare to see this particular flu virus so we are taking every reasonable precaution to eliminate it from the community.”

              There are a total of 58 children at the school but only those 12 who have been in close contact with the infected child, will receive treatment.

              Health official contacted parents of all the children at the school by letter informing them of the situation and inviting them to a meeting to discuss any concerns.

              The school was expected to reopen as normal after half term.

              Victims of the virus present typical flu symptoms such as aches, coughs, a fever and sore throat or conjunctivitis.

              The Defra helpline number is 08459 33 55 77.
              </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
              http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk/0100n...name_page.html
              CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

              treyfish2004@yahoo.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

                There are a total of 58 children at the school but only those 12 who have been in close contact with the infected child, will receive treatment.





                arent children in schools in close contact with each other,classes dinner rooms passing each other in corridors swopping classes,etc i thought it would have been wise to treat all of them,schools after all are potential breeding grounds for bugs that this virus could mutate with surely.......?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

                  Avian Flu cases in North Wales

                  Monday, 28 May 2007


                  Cases of the H7 flu virus have been identified following the discovery of avian flu at a smallholding near Corwen in North Wales.

                  The latest update can be found here.

                  Key messages
                  • The illness people are experiencing is, for the most part, not serious. No one is seriously ill.
                  • Preliminary investigations indicate that we cannot exclude person to person spread having occurred in this outbreak. Person to person spread would be very unusual but limited spread of this type has been seen elsewhere in the past in some cases of bird flu. There is no laboratory confirmation. As a precautionary measure the NPHS is continuing to offer people who have had contact with individuals with this illness antiviral medication to minimise the risk of spread.
                  • Experience of this particular bird flu virus in humans is limited so we are actively managing the public health response.
                  • The risk to the health of the general public is assessed to be low.
                  Avian flu cases and contacts in people

                  By 3pm yesterday, Sunday 27 May, 12 avian flu contacts had been identified who have or have had symptoms of a flu like illness or conjunctivitis. No one is seriously ill.

                  The National Public Health Service for Wales (NPHS) has identified 142 people who may have had contact with the avian flu:
                  • 47 in the household setting
                  • 14 in school
                  • 81 in the workplace setting
                  The list is constantly changing as possible contacts are added to or taken off the database. Contacts are added if contact was possible. They are taken off if detailed questioning shows that there was no contact.

                  The National Public Health Service (NPHS) is using the following definitions of cases and contacts:
                  • A case is an individual with influenza-like illness (fever above 38° C, aches and pains, cough/head cold, sore throat or conjunctivitis) who has been in contact with affected premises or to known infected poultry (handling/within one metre) or close contact with another human case.
                  • A contact is defined as an individual who has been in contact with affected premises or with known infected poultry (handling/within one meter) or has had close contact with another person with confirmed or presumptive avian influenza).
                  Investigations

                  The National Public Health Service for Wales (NPHS) has received microbiological test results from nine people in Wales so far. These are from swabs taken from the nose and throat and eyes. They have been tested for the Influenza A viruses, including the H7 subtype that has been isolated from the affected poultry. Two tests have been reported as positive for H7 subtype.

                  Definition of a case of avian flu relies as much on clinical symptoms with a history of contact with infected birds or another human case.

                  For this reason, the NPHS is contacting every individual who has been in close contact with the people who are cases. People identified as contacts are being offered medication to reduce the severity of any impact from the infection.

                  The NPHS is continuing to investigate and identify potential contacts today.
                  Dr Marion Lyons, Lead Consultant in Communicable Disease Control for the National Public Health Service for Wales, said: “We are actively managing the outbreak. This involves taking every precaution in identifying possible contacts of the infected poultry or people who have been ill after contact with the infected poultry.

                  “We have identified contacts of a child in a school setting and a number of possible contacts in workplaces. Each of these is being followed up to establish whether they had symptoms or not.

                  “We are looking for people who have had flu like symptoms or conjunctivitis. It is the symptoms which are important to identify. It is reassuring that so few of the large number of contacts have had symptoms.”

                  “People who have had contact with someone who is well but who we have identified as a contact need not be worried.

                  “People can also be confident that, the more remote the contact with infected birds, the less likely that the symptoms that we have defined would really be H7 flu.”
                  Control Measures

                  People with symptoms of conjunctivitis and flu and meet the definition of a case have been given treatment. They have been advised to stay at home until they are better.

                  All well contacts are being given medication to reduce the severity of any impact from the infection.
                  Public Health Messages

                  Dr Marion Lyons, Lead Consultant in Communicable Disease Control for the National Public Health Service for Wales, said: “We believe the risk to the health of the general public is low. Avian flu is primarily a disease of birds. H7N2 is different to and very mild compared with H5N1.

                  “Of the people with conjunctivitis or a flu-like illness, some did not have close contact with infected poultry.
                  “The illness people are experiencing is, for the most part, not serious. No one is seriously ill.

                  “Preliminary investigations indicate that we cannot exclude person to person spread having occurred in this outbreak. Person to person spread would be very unusual but limited spread of this type has been seen elsewhere in the past in some cases of bird flu. There is no laboratory confirmation. As a precautionary measure the NPHS is continuing to offer people who have had contact with individuals with this illness antiviral medication to minimise the risk of spread.

                  “Investigations also show that, when it spreads from person to person, the illness experienced becomes milder.

                  “Experience of this particular bird flu virus (H7N2) in humans is limited so we are actively managing the public health response.”

                  Communication

                  A Special Helpline available for general information about avian flu in people is open from 7am to 8pm daily. The number is 0845 600 3678.

                  Further information will be posted on this website as it becomes available.

                  An information sheet prepared by the NPHS for people who may have been exposed to Avian Flu is available from the link: Information for people who may have been exposed to avian flu

                  This information sheet is also available in Welsh from the link: Gwybodaeth i bobl a allai fod wedi cael eu hamlygu i ffliw adar

                  An updated Q&A information sheet for the public prepared by the NPHS is available to download from the link: Q&A Avian Influenza in North Wales (updated 26/05/2007)

                  This information sheet is also available in Welsh from the link: Gwybodaeth i’r Cyhoedd ar ffurf Cwestiynau ac Atebion am Ffliw Adar H7N2 yng Ngogledd Cymru

                  Situation updates are also available from the Welsh Assembly Government website at: http://new.wales.gov.uk/news/presreleasearchive/?lang=en

                  A map detailing the Avian Influenza Restricted Zone declared in accordance with Article 55 of the Avian Influenza and Influenza of Avian Origin in Mammals (Wales) (No.2) Order 2006 is also given on the Welsh Assembly website at: http://new.wales.gov.uk/topics/environmentcountryside/ahw/disease_surveillance_control/avianflu/avianfludeclaration/?lang=en

                  More information about avian influenza is also available from the Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) website at: http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/diseases/notifiable/disease/ai/index.htm



                  Source: National Public Health Service for Wales (NPHS)

                  http://www.wales.nhs.uk/sites3/news....contentid=6796

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

                    Originally posted by Florida1 View Post
                    Good idea.

                    Henry do you want to explain why we are following this so closely even though it is not H5N1 and appears not to be a strain with a high case fatality rate?
                    This outbreak is important for two reasons. One is the speed at which the H7N2 infections can grow. The outbreak in the Netherlands quickly grew to over 1000 people, although this number was obtained retrospectively by looking at serum of contacts. The initial tests, which looked for virus detected 80 some odd patients who were cullers or contacts of cullers.

                    The most recent H7 infections in British Columbia and England had more limited spread, but both were H7N3, and both had lab confirmed cases.

                    Initial reports of 11 patients with symptoms from an outbreak involving 10 dead chickens suggested that this may indeed be another example of very efficient H2H transmission. The second poultry site, and possible distribution of infected birds to multiple small holdings, raised the possibility of multiple foci that could expand rapidly.

                    H7 in humans is not a good situation because the virus can change. Morover, the receptor binding domain on H7 can be acquired by H5N1, which is quite lethal and could be quite devastating if it acquired the H2H transmissiblilty seem previously, and possibly currently, by H7.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

                      Originally posted by niman View Post

                      H7 in humans is not a good situation because the virus can change. Morover, the receptor binding domain on H7 can be acquired by H5N1, which is quite lethal and could be quite devastating if it acquired the H2H transmissiblilty seem previously, and possibly currently, by H7.
                      So it's the receptor binding domain on H7 that makes it so readily transmissible?

                      Is there anything else about H7 that makes it so easily transmissibile?

                      So an H7 outbreak in close vicinity of an H5 carrying fowl or mammal would be the worst case scenary for recombination?

                      J.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

                        Originally posted by cartski View Post
                        So it's the receptor binding domain on H7 that makes it so readily transmissible?

                        Is there anything else about H7 that makes it so easily transmissibile?

                        So an H7 outbreak in close vicinity of an H5 carrying fowl or mammal would be the worst case scenary for recombination?

                        J.
                        Yes, in addition to the human cases linked to H7 poultry isolates, H7N7 has been isolates from horses and a seal

                        A/seal/Mass/1/1980(H7N7).

                        These isolates have M230I, which is in all three human serotypes (H1N1, H3N2, and influenza B) and H5N1 in Egypt has two versions of M230I. One version matches the sequnece in H7, so it is likely that some recombination has already happened.
                        Last edited by HenryN; May 28th, 2007, 02:15 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

                          If H7N2 were to combine with H5N1, would it result in a new (H?N?) avian influenza virus or would it be a new strain of H7N2 or H5N1? How different would the recombined virus need to be in order to be reclassified as a new virus? Please explain answer in lay terms, as much as possible. Thank you!
                          "In the beginning of change, the patriot is a scarce man (or woman https://flutrackers.com/forum/core/i...ilies/wink.png), and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for it then costs nothing to be a patriot."- Mark TwainReason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it. -Thomas Paine

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

                            could be H7N1,H7N2,H5N1,H5N2 with reassortment.
                            I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
                            my current links: [url]http://bit.ly/hFI7H[/url] ILI-charts: [url]http://bit.ly/CcRgT[/url]

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Confirmation of Avian Influenza H7N2 Infection

                              I'm starting to write down the cases.
                              I have positive: The pupil today, 2 from Wales and 2 from N. England. No names. Is that correct?

                              Comment

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