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  • Wild Birds with H5N1 in England 2008

    New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans



    Jo Revill, Observer chief Whitehall correspondent
    Thursday January 10, 2008
    Guardian Unlimited



    Three dead swans found on a nature reserve in Dorset were today found to have been carrying the lethal strain of bird flu, sparking fears that the virus had again landed on Britain's shores.
    Urgent tests were under way to check the other birds and ducks at the swannery in Abbotsbury, where the dead mute swans were found in the past 48 hours. The department for the environment, food and rural affairs (Defra) was expected to issue a statement later this today to confirm that the H5N1 strain had been found in the birds.

    The latest cases, coming after an outbreak at the Bernard Matthews factory in Suffolk last year, will particularly worry experts because the pattern suggests the infection may have come from wild birds.

    In previous cases, human errors such as contaminated transport or feed were found to have caused outbreaks of the disease in birds.
    The mute swans had not migrated into Britain - when they do fly, they normally travel very short distances. It appears likely they caught the virus from other wild birds or ducks that came into the swannery for the winter months.
    Tests being carried out at government laboratories will reveal whether the birds had a highly dangerous form of the virus, categorised as "low pathogen" or "high pathogen".
    Bird flu currently remains a disease that affects poultry, but there are fears that, if it mutates, it could turn into a form that is highly contagious to human beings, and form a flu pandemic.
    The Abbotsbury swannery is a highly popular visitor attraction in the summer, and was originally set up during the 1040s by monks in Dorset who regarded swan meat as a great delicacy. Close to the south Dorset shore, it consists of different pools in which swans can feed and breed. From mid-May to late June, hundreds of fluffy cygnets hatch from eggs in nests on or near the pathways.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/birdflu/st...238598,00.html
    <!--Article is not commented: 0 -->

  • #2
    Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

    Avian flu discovered in wild birds in Dorset

    News | 10 January, 2008
    By Alistair Driver
    DEFRA is expected to announce the discovery of avian flu in wild birds on the Dorset coast this afternoon.
    It is understood the disease has been found in three wild swans but it is not yet known if the strain of the disease found is of the highly pathogenic variety.


    As the disease has not been found in farmed of domestic poultry, it is also understood that movement restrictions will not be put in place. More news when we get it.

    http://www.farmersguardian.com/story...code=15538&c=1

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

      New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans



      Jo Revill, Observer chief Whitehall correspondent
      Thursday January 10, 2008
      Guardian Unlimited



      Abbotsbury Swannery, in Dorset. Photograph: David Mansell



      Three dead swans found on a nature reserve in Dorset were today found to have been carrying the lethal strain of bird flu, sparking fears that the virus had again landed on Britain's shores.
      Urgent tests were under way to check the other birds and ducks at the swannery in Abbotsbury, where the dead mute swans were found in the past 48 hours. The department for the environment, food and rural affairs (Defra) was expected to issue a statement later this today to confirm that the H5N1 strain had been found in the birds.

      The latest cases, coming after an outbreak at the Bernard Matthews factory in Suffolk last year, will particularly worry experts because the pattern suggests the infection may have come from wild birds.

      In previous cases, human errors such as contaminated transport or feed were found to have caused outbreaks of the disease in birds.
      The mute swans had not migrated into Britain - when they do fly, they normally travel very short distances. It appears likely they caught the virus from other wild birds or ducks that came into the swannery for the winter months.
      Tests being carried out at government laboratories will reveal whether the birds had a highly dangerous form of the virus, categorised as "low pathogen" or "high pathogen".
      Bird flu currently remains a disease that affects poultry, but there are fears that, if it mutates, it could turn into a form that is highly contagious to human beings, and form a flu pandemic.
      The Abbotsbury swannery is a highly popular visitor attraction in the summer, and was originally set up during the 1040s by monks in Dorset who regarded swan meat as a great delicacy. Close to the south Dorset shore, it consists of different pools in which swans can feed and breed. From mid-May to late June, hundreds of fluffy cygnets hatch from eggs in nests on or near the pathways.

      http://observer.guardian.co.uk/uk_ne...rc=rss&feed=15
      <!--Article is not commented: 0 -->

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

        Commentary at

        http://www.recombinomics.com/News/01...and_Swans.html

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

          Nobel House, 17 Smith Square, London SW1P 3JR
          Out of hours telephone 020 7270 8960
          <!-- #BeginEditable "Pre-title" --><!-- #EndEditable -->

          <!-- #BeginEditable "Title" -->Avian Influenza H5N1 confirmed in wild birds in Dorset <!-- #EndEditable -->

          <!-- #BeginEditable "Body" -->Defra has today confirmed Avian Influenza in three dead wild mute swans in the Chesil Beach area in Dorset, following positive test results from the Veterinary Laboratories Agency for the highly pathogenic strain of H5N1. These birds were found and tested following our routine surveillance programme.

          A Wild Bird Control Area and Monitoring Area are being established around the premises, encompassing Chesil Beach and Portland Bill, and the shape of these is based on expert ornithological advice.

          Inside these areas bird keepers are required to house their birds or otherwise isolate them from contact with wild birds, bird movements will be restricted, and bird gatherings are banned. Defra is also working closely with ornithological and other experts to consider what wider measures may be needed.

          No disease has been found in domestic birds, and a programme of surveillance is being carried out in the local wild bird population. There will be no culling of wild birds because such action may disperse birds further and would not aid control.

          Acting Chief Veterinary Officer Fred Landeg said:

          ?While this is obviously unwelcome news, we have always said that Britain is at a constant low level of risk of introduction of Avian Influenza. Our message to all bird keepers, particularly those in the area, is that they must be vigilant, report any signs of disease immediately, and practice the highest levels of biosecurity.?

          A full epidemiological investigation is underway.

          All poultry keepers on the GB Poultry Register are being notified, and the EU Commission has been informed.
          <!-- #EndEditable --><!-- #BeginEditable "Editors" -->Notes to editors<!-- #EndEditable -->

          <!-- #BeginEditable "Notes" -->
          1. Information is available from the Defra Helpline (08459 33 55 77) - see www.defra.gov.uk for current opening hours. Bird keepers can also call the Animal Health recorded information line for the latest updates on 0844 884 4600.
          2. Avian Influenza is a disease of birds. While it can pass very rarely and with difficulty to humans, this usually requires extremely close contact with infected birds, particularly faeces. Advice from the Food Standards Agency remains that properly cooked poultry and poultry products, including eggs, are safe to eat.
          3. All Avian Influenza (H1 to H16) can be low pathogenic but only H5 and H7 are known to become highly pathogenic.
          4. Inside the Control Area and the Monitoring Area, the measures required by the EU Wild Bird Decision will be applied, including bird movements which will be restricted.
          5. All poultry keepers registered with the GB Poultry Register will be contacted by text message with updates. All poultry keepers responsible for a premises with 50 or more birds are legally required to register. Defra strongly encourages those with less than 50 birds to register voluntarily.
          6. The details on the measures that apply in the current zones can be found on the Defra website at www.defra.gov.uk/avianflu
          7. This is the second highly pathogenic H5N1 Avian Influenza case detected in a wild bird in the British Isles. The previous case was the swan found in Cellardyke, Fife in April 2006.
          8. Recent H5N1 cases in commercial poultry in Britain:
            November 2007 ? premises near Diss, Norfolk
            February 2007 ? premises in Upper Holton, Suffolk
            October 2005 ? quarantine premises in Essex
          <!-- #EndEditable -->
          End
          Public enquiries: 08459 335577
          News releases available on our website:
          www.defra.gov.uk
          Defra's aim is sustainable development
          <!--End of Central Content editable text area --><!--Date Modified and Published--><!-- InstanceBeginEditable name="PubDate" -->Page published: 10 January 2008: 14:55

          http://www.defra.gov.uk/news/2008/080110b.htm<!-- InstanceEndEditable --><!--End Date-->
          <!--Footer-->

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          • #6
            Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

            Map

            http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UT...3&t=h&z=6&om=0

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

              Swans test positive for bird flu









              Three dead wild swans test positive for deadly bird flu

              Three wild swans found dead in Dorset have tested positive for the H5N1 strain of bird flu, the Government confirmed.
              The birds were found in the Chesil Beach area of the county during routine surveillance.

              A control area has been set up in the area, within which bird owners must isolate their flocks from wild birds. No disease has been found in domestic birds, and a programme of surveillance of wild birds is to be carried out.

              Defra said there were no plans to cull wild flocks as this may disperse birds further. The Government's acting chief veterinary officer, Fred Landeg, said: "While this is obviously unwelcome news, we have always said that Britain is at a constant low level of risk of introduction of avian influenza.

              "Our message to all bird keepers, particularly those in the area, is that they must be vigilant, report any signs of disease immediately, and practice the highest levels of biosecurity."

              John Houston, general manager at Abbotsbury Tourism Ltd, said the dead birds were found by a member of staff at Abbotsbury Swannery and Defra was notified as part of standard procedure.

              Three mute swans from the Swannery have been identified as having the deadly H5N1 virus, he said in a statement.

              "Our main concern is the welfare of the swans, our staff and the general public," Mr Houston said. "We are working closely with Defra to ensure that this outbreak is contained and that the number of swans affected is limited. We are also working with the Health Protection Agency to ensure that staff and public are fully protected."

              The Abbotsbury Swannery is a reserve for free flying swans and wild birds and is part of an internationally important wetland. The Swannery has been under the stewardship of the Ilchester Estates since 1541, although records of a Swannery on the site date back to 1354.

              It is a seasonal tourist attraction which closed to the public on October 28 last year and is due to reopen on March 15.

              http://www.portsmouth.co.uk/latest-n...ird.3661580.jp

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

                A link to the Swannery in Abbotsbury:

                http://www.abbotsburytourism.co.uk/swannery/home.htm
                ?Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights ? that must be our call to arms"
                Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

                  Bird flu discovered in three dead swans

                  Thursday, January 10, 2008

                  Three wild swans found dead in Dorset have tested positive for the H5N1 strain of bird flu, the Government confirmed today.
                  The birds were found in the Chesil Beach area of the county during routine surveillance.
                  A control area has been set up in the area, within which bird owners must isolate their flocks from wild birds.
                  No disease has been found in domestic birds, and a programme of surveillance of wild birds is to be carried out.
                  More will follow...

                  http://www.metro.co.uk/news/article....34&ito=newsnow

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

                    H5N1 bird flu strain kills three swans in England
                    10 Jan 2008 15:00:44 GMT
                    <!-- 10 Jan 2008 15:00:44 GMT ## for search indexer, do not remove -->Source: Reuters

                    <!-- AN5.0 article title end -->
                    <SCRIPT language=JavaScript src="/bin/js/article.js"></SCRIPT>
                    </SPAN> <!-- H5N1 bird flu strain kills three swans in England --><!-- Reuters -->LONDON, Jan 10 (Reuters) - The highly pathogenic H5N1 bird flu strain has been confirmed in three wild mute swans found dead in Dorset, southern England, Britain's farm ministry said on Thursday. (Reporting by Nigel Hunt; Editing by Michael Roddy)

                    http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/L10868766.htm

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

                      DEADLY BIRD FLU FOUND IN SWANS




                      The lethal strain was found in wild swans


                      Thursday January 10,2008

                      By Nicola McCafferty for express.co.uk


                      THREE dead wild swans have been found to contain the lethal HN51 strain of the bird flu virus, it was confirmed today.

                      The Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) carried out an investigation into the deaths of the three swans earlier today and found they were infected with the HN51 strain of the virus.

                      The examination began after three swans were found dead in the Chesil Beach area of Dorset during routine surveillance.

                      A control area has been set up in the area, within which bird owners must isolate their flocks from wild birds.

                      No disease has been found in domestic birds, and a programme of surveillance of wild birds is to be carried out.

                      Defra said there were no plans to cull wild flocks as this may disperse birds further.

                      The Government's acting chief veterinary officer, Fred Landeg, said: "While this is obviously unwelcome news, we have always said that Britain is at a constant low level of risk of introduction of avian influenza.

                      "Our message to all bird keepers, particularly those in the area, is that they must be vigilant, report any signs of disease immediately, and practice the highest levels of biosecurity."

                      John Houston, general manager at Abbotsbury Tourism Ltd, said the dead birds were found by a member of staff at Abbotsbury Swannery and Defra was notified as part of standard procedure.

                      http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/...found-in-swans

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

                        Commentary at

                        http://www.recombinomics.com/News/01...Confirmed.html

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

                          Three dead swans found with H5N1 bird flu on Dorset reserve owned by one of Britain's richest women

                          Last updated at 16:20pm on 10th January 2008
                          Comments
                          Three dead swans found on a nature reserve in Dorset were carrying the lethal strain of bird flu, sparking fears that the virus had again landed on Britain's shores.


                          Urgent tests are under way to check the other birds and ducks at Abbotsbury swannery where the dead swans were found in the past 48 hours.
                          The Abbotsbury Swannery on the Ilchester Estate is owned by Charlotte Townshend, who is one of the richest women in Britain. Scroll down for more...
                          The three dead swans are currently being tested by DEFRA (file picture)


                          Charlotte Townshend's husband is the Dorset chairman of the Countryside Alliance and she owns 40 acres of in London's exclusive Holland Park.
                          Defra said there were no plans to cull wild flocks as this may disperse birds further.
                          The Government's acting chief veterinary officer, Fred Landeg, said: "While this is obviously unwelcome news, we have always said that Britain is at a constant low level of risk of introduction of avian influenza.
                          "Our message to all bird keepers, particularly those in the area, is that they must be vigilant, report any signs of disease immediately, and practice the highest levels of biosecurity."
                          John Houston, general manager at Abbotsbury Tourism Ltd, said the dead birds were found by a member of staff at Abbotsbury Swannery and Defra was notified as part of standard procedure.
                          Three mute swans from the Swannery have been identified as having the deadly H5N1 virus, he said in a statement. "Our main concern is the welfare of the swans, our staff and the general public," Mr Houston said.
                          "We are working closely with Defra to ensure that this outbreak is contained and that the number of swans affected is limited.
                          "We are also working with the Health Protection Agency to ensure that staff and public are fully protected."

                          Today's discovery comes less than a month after restrictions on poultry movement were lifted in Norfolk and Suffolk.
                          The restriction zone, which covered parts of the two counties, was imposed following an outbreak of H5N1 on a free range turkey farm in November, and only removed on December 19.
                          Thousands of birds on six premises were culled in the wake of the outbreak, which Defra said had been contained to two farms in Suffolk.
                          In a preliminary report into the outbreak, Defra said wild birds could not be ruled out as the source of infection - although there was no evidence of H5N1 in wild birds in the area.
                          Epidemiological research found no evidence that the virus was introduced by infected poultry or poultry products, or by vehicles or people transporting them, from countries which have the disease in domestic flocks.
                          The Abbotsbury Swannery is a reserve for free flying swans and wild birds and is part of an internationally important wetland.
                          The Swannery has been under the stewardship of the Ilchester Estates since 1541, although records of a Swannery on the site date back to 1354. It is a seasonal tourist attraction which closed to the public on October 28 last year and is due to reopen on March 15.

                          http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/liv...=1770&ito=1490

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

                            Bird flu sends shock-waves through Dorset
                            By Julie Magee
                            THE confirmation of a bird flu outbreak in Dorset has sent shock-waves through local communities.
                            News that three dead swans at Abbotsbury had been found carrying the deadly H5N1 strain, is the last thing farmers, tourist chiefs and poultry owners wanted to hear.
                            Thursday's discovery comes less than a month after restrictions on poultry movement were lifted in Norfolk and Suffolk.
                            The restriction zone was imposed following an outbreak of H5N1 on a free range turkey farm in November and only removed on December 19.
                            Thousands of birds on six premises were culled in the wake of the outbreak, which Defra said had been contained to two farms in Suffolk.
                            In a preliminary report into the outbreak, Defra said wild birds could not be ruled out as a source of infection.
                            Thursday's shock discovery in the Chesil Beach area is the second H5N1 avian influenza case detected in a wild bird in the British Isles.
                            The previous case, also involving a swan, was confirmed in Cellardyke, Fife in April 2006.
                            As fears grew of a bird flu epidemic, following the discovery of an infected swan, Dorset residents dialled the emergency services at the mere sighting of a dead sparrow.
                            Dorset police wildlife officer PC John Snellin advised people not to touch dead birds but contact Defra if a swan, goose or group of birds were involved.
                            He said: "Bird flu doesn't affect all birds - it's really just waterfowl such as swans and geese."
                            Avian influenza is a disease of birds. While it can pass very rarely and with difficulty to humans, this usually requires extremely close contact with infected birds, particularly faeces.
                            If the virus gained the ability to pass easily between humans the results could be "catastrophic", scientists have claimed.
                            Should it mutate, experts predict anything between two million and 50 million deaths.
                            Symptoms in humans are similar to other types of flu and may include a fever or cough, shortness of breath, headache, sore eyes, muscle aches or a sore throat. People cannot be affected by properly cooked poultry.
                            H5N1 claimed its first human victim; a three-year-old boy, in Hong Kong in May 1997.
                            Since being detected again in February 2003, it has spread west through Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Africa, despite mass bird culls and exclusion zones.
                            According to figures from the World Health Organisation there have been 335 confirmed cases of H5N1 in humans, leading to 206 deaths.
                            Advice from the Food Standards Agency remains that property cooked poultry and poultry products, including eggs, are safe to eat.
                            Local councils have contingency plans in the event of an outbreak of bird flu in their area.
                            Ian Johnson, South West spokesman for the National Farmers' Union, said: "After the last 12 months of plague and pestilence, this is the last thing on God's green earth we would have wished for.
                            "We have got to deal with it expediently but there is no need to panic as it appears to have been contained.
                            "Vigilance is important amongst poultry keepers but, given a fair wind and co-operation in minding the controls, there is no reason to believe it is anything but an isolated yet regrettable outbreak and we are working very closely with Defra."
                            West Dorset MP Oliver Letwin, whose constituency includes the swannery, said: "Obviously this is very worrying for poultry farmers and others but I am glad to see it is being treated with the seriousness it deserves.
                            "I very much hope we will get through this with the swannery intact, because it is a remarkable national institution of real beauty and real ecological significance."
                            5:47pm today

                            http://www.thisisdorset.net/display....ugh_dorset.php

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: New bird flu fears as virus found in dead swans (England)

                              Mute Swans Infected With Bird Flu In Dorset, England

                              10 Jan 2008

                              Authorities are trying to find out how the virulent H5N1 bird flu virus strain infected and killed three mute swans in Dorset, England. Other birds at Abbotsbury Swannery are being tested. Abbotsbury Swannery, approximately 9 miles from Weymouth, is a bird sanctuary. According to Defra (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs), the dead birds were found while routine surveillance was taking place.

                              Authorities are asking all bird keepers, particularly those in Dorset, to be extra vigilant. Experts say birds will not be culled as this move could disperse birds further away.

                              John Houston, Abbotsbury Swannery, said this latest outbreak is a "big shock" for him and all his staff. He stressed that his main concern is for the welfare of the swans, staff and the general public. "We are also working with the Health Protection Agency to ensure that staff and public are fully protected," he said.

                              Experts say this latest outbreak is more worrying because it involves wild birds.

                              Defra informs that tests from the Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA) confirm that the swans were infected with the highly pathogenic (virulent) H5N1 avian influenza virus strain. A 3km Control Area and 10km Monitoring Area are being established around the premises. Within these areas bird gatherings will be banned, and bird keepers must house their birds or make sure they are cannot come into contact with wild birds or their feathers and droppings.

                              Defra adds that it is working closely with ornithological experts to consider what wider measures may be required. So far, no domestic birds have been reported as infected.

                              More information on movement restrictions applying during an Avian Influenza outbreak

                              If you need to report dead wild gulls, waders, ducks, geese or swans; groups of dead birds or need advice on avian flu, please contact the Defra Helpline 08459 33 55 77 Mon - Fri, 9am - 5pm. More information on finding dead birds is available. For information on the disposal of poultry please see Defra's Fallen Stock pages.

                              -- Abbotsbury Swannery
                              -- Map (Zoom out to see more of UK)
                              -- Defra - Avian Flu Page
                              -- "Avian Influenza - Still a Disease of Birds", British Veterinary Association

                              Written by - Christian Nordqvist
                              Copyright: Medical News Today
                              Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today


                              <HR SIZE=1>Article URL: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/93615.php

                              Main News Category: Bird Flu / Avian Flu
                              Also Appears In: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses, Veterinary,

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