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High Rate of Texas Bugs Carrying Chagas Disease

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  • High Rate of Texas Bugs Carrying Chagas Disease

    Source: http://www.newswise.com/articles/hig...chagas-disease


    High Rate of Texas Bugs Carrying Chagas Disease
    Released: 17-Sep-2015 12:05 PM EDT
    Source Newsroom: University of Texas at El Paso

    Newswise — A deadly parasite that causes Chagas disease is widespread in a common Texas insect, according to a new study by University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) researchers. The finding suggests that the risk of Texans contracting the disease may be higher than previously thought.

    Curious to know the prevalence of T. cruzi in west Texas insects, UTEP biologists set traps to collect the bugs at the University’s Indio Mountains Research Station. The station sits about 100 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border in Hudspeth County, Texas.

    In all, the researchers trapped 39 kissing bugs (Triatoma rubida) and tests revealed that 24 bugs— or 61 percent — were infected with T. cruzi. The findings were published in the journal Acta Tropica...

  • #2
    Historical Perspectives on the Epidemiology of Human Chagas Disease in Texas and Recommendations for Enhanced Understanding of Clinical Chagas Disease in the Southern United States

    November 5, 2015

    Abstract


    Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi infection) has recently been identified as an important neglected tropical disease in the United States. Anecdotally referred to as a “silent killer,” it leads to the development of potentially fatal cardiac disease in approximately 30% of those infected. In an attempt to better understand the potential of Chagas disease as a significant underlying cause of morbidity in Texas, we performed a historical literature review to assess disease burden.

    Human reports of triatomine bites and disease exposure were found to be prevalent in Texas. Despite current beliefs that Chagas disease is a recently emerging disease, we report historical references dating as far back as 1935. Both imported cases and autochthonous transmission contribute to the historical disease burden in Texas.

    We end by discussing the current knowledge gaps, and recommend priorities for advancing further epidemiologic studies and their policy implications.


    LINK TO FULL ARTICLE
    Chagas disease ( Trypanosoma cruzi infection) has recently been identified as an important neglected tropical disease in the United States. Anecdotally referred to as a “silent killer,” it leads to the development of potentially fatal cardiac disease in approximately 30% of those infected. In an attempt to better understand the potential of Chagas disease as a significant underlying cause of morbidity in Texas, we performed a historical literature review to assess disease burden. Human reports of triatomine bites and disease exposure were found to be prevalent in Texas. Despite current beliefs that Chagas disease is a recently emerging disease, we report historical references dating as far back as 1935. Both imported cases and autochthonous transmission contribute to the historical disease burden in Texas. We end by discussing the current knowledge gaps, and recommend priorities for advancing further epidemiologic studies and their policy implications.
    “Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights – that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

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