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  • Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

    H1N1 shots start next week
    Chief medical officer urging everyone to get immunized
    By JOHN McPHEE Health Reporter
    Thu. Oct 22 - 4:46 AM

    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=200 align=left><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=10 width="100%" bgColor=#ffffff><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top bgColor=#f0f0f0><IMG title="Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer, fields questions at a news conference in Halifax on Wednesday. Dr. Strang said the first shipment of 52,000 doses of H1N1 vaccine has arrived and the province will begin immunizing the public against swine flu next week. (ANDREW VAUGHAN / CP)
    " src="http://thechronicleherald.ca/photos/large/10-22-09_vaccine1.jpg" border=0>

    The first 52,000 of an expected 1.4 million doses of the H1N1 vaccine arrived here on Monday.
    <IMG title="Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer, fields questions at a news conference in Halifax on Wednesday. Dr. Strang said the first shipment of 52,000 doses of H1N1 vaccine has arrived and the province will begin immunizing the public against swine flu next week. (ANDREW VAUGHAN / CP)
    " src="http://thechronicleherald.ca/photos/large/10-22-09_strang.jpg" border=0>

    Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia’s chief medical officer, fields questions at a news conference in Halifax on Wednesday. Dr. Strang said the first shipment of 52,000 doses of H1N1 vaccine has arrived and the province will begin immunizing the public against swine flu next week. (ANDREW VAUGHAN / CP)

    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE cellSpacing=8 cellPadding=0 width="100%" bgColor=#f0f0f0><TBODY><TR><TD class=module-titles bgColor=#ffffff><TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=10 width="100%" bgColor=#cccccc><TBODY><TR><TD class=infobox bgColor=#ffffff>WHO SHOULD GET VACCINATED:
    Who should and shouldn’t get the H1N1 vaccine:

    •Everyone 10 years of age or older should receive one dose of adjuvanted vaccine.
    •Children between six months and 10 years should receive the adjuvanted vaccine in two half-doses, administered at least 21 days apart.

    •Pregnant women are advised to get one dose of unadjuvanted vaccine, though if they are 20 weeks or more into their pregnancy and the unadjuvanted vaccine isn’t available, they are advised to get the adjuvanted shot.
    •Infants less than six months old aren’t vaccinated for any form of influenza.


    The H1N1 vaccine is strongly recommended for:
    •People under age 65 with chronic conditions
    •Health care workers
    •Children six months to five years old
    •Pregnant women
    •Household contacts and care providers for infants less than six months old
    •People whose immune systems are compromised


    Two new groups have been added to the list of those who are strongly recommended to get the seasonal flu vaccine:
    •People living in a home that is expecting a newborn during the November to April flu season
    •Anyone who lives with or cares for children less than 24 months old

    Other groups previously identified as a priority for the seasonal flu vaccine include people 65 and over, residents of long-term care facilities and adults and children with chronic illnesses.

    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
    </TD><TD>
    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>The province will begin its swine flu immunization program next week.
    The first 52,000 of an expected 1.4 million doses of the H1N1 vaccine arrived Monday.

    The vaccine will be administered at community clinics and doctors’ offices in the province’s largest-ever immunization campaign, said Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical officer for Nova Scotia.

    The rest of the vaccine will arrive over the coming weeks.

    » Check out flu activity in Canada and around the world
    » British swine flu cases double in one week

    He made the announcement at a news conference Wednesday, soon after the federal government approved the H1N1 vaccine for use in Canada.

    "I urge all Nova Scotians to get their H1N1 immunization," Dr. Strang said.

    Health Canada has identified certain groups, such as health care workers, that will benefit most from immunization. The vaccine will be distributed directly to hospitals and long-term care facilities so that staff can be immunized.

    But the vaccine will be available to everyone, whether they are in the identified priority groups or not, Dr. Strang said.

    "We’re not going to be turning people away."

    The vaccination program will begin Wednesday or Thursday of next week, he said.

    The first batch of vaccine contains an immune system booster, called an adjuvant, that has raised concerns about its safety.

    Dr. Strang stressed that the benefits of the vaccine with the immune booster far outweigh any "theoretical" risks associated with the adjuvant.

    "I am confident that this is a very safe vaccine. In Canada, we have a robust regulatory system. The vaccine would not be licensed if it were not safe."

    Details such as schedules and the exact locations of the mass immunization clinics are still being worked out, Dr. Strang said.

    The immunization announcement comes as the "second wave" of the swine flu outbreak appears to have begun in the province.

    There have been sporadic cases this week, including a confirmed case of a staff member at an Antigonish school. A cluster of students have also fallen ill, likely with the H1N1 virus, Dr. Strang said.

    The first wave of swine flu began in April at King’s-Edgehill School in Windsor. The outbreak spread across the province throughout the spring and summer. A Cape Breton woman died and 17 people were sent to hospital.

    In the second wave, "we expect to see large numbers of people becoming ill," Dr. Strang said. "This will increase stresses on the health system."

    He said young, healthy people have been hard hit by the virus, noting that they accounted for one-third of all swine flu deaths in the first wave.

    Pregnant women are also more vulnerable, but it is recommended they don’t receive the adjuvanted vaccine.

    The Public Health Agency of Canada has said pregnant women should get one dose of the vaccine without the immunity booster. But this vaccine likely won’t be available until mid-November.

    Dr. Strang also announced a change in the province’s immunization policy at the news conference.

    The province is no longer recommending that only people over 65 or in long-term health facilities get the seasonal flu vaccine.

    The province was acting on studies that indicated the H1N1 vaccine would not work for those who had received the seasonal flu shot.

    But new information has convinced health officials to administer the vaccines at the same time. Both will be available at the vaccination clinics beginning next week, Dr. Strang said.

    The federal government has shipped two million doses of the swine flu vaccine to the provinces and territories. The government aims to ship about three million doses a week.

    Pharmaceutical giant Glaxo-SmithKline has a contract to produce 50.4 million doses of pandemic vaccine at its facility in Sainte-Foy, Que.

    Nova Scotia health officials will launch an advertising and marketing campaign about the H1N1 virus in the coming weeks. This will include a live webcast next Thursday during which Dr. Strang will answer questions from the public.

    More information is available on the province’s website, www.gov.ns.ca/H1N1, or by calling the 811 HealthLink phone line.


    http://thechronicleherald.ca/Front/1148765.html
    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

  • #2
    Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD width="100%">LOCAL NEWS</TD><TD></TD><TD></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD background=images/dash.gif height=1></TD></TR><TR><TD align=right></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD height=10>Last updated at 11:12 PM on 23/10/09 </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
    H1N1 Clinics start next week
    The News

    New Glasgow – The Pictou County Health Authority will begin its H1N1 and seasonal flu immunization clinics next week as part of Nova Scotia’s biggest immunization campaign ever.

    Clinics will be offered for H1N1 and seasonal flu vaccines beginning Wednesday and running for the next five weeks. Clinic times and locations may be adjusted in response to demand and supplies.

    “The clinic schedule makes the vaccine available to everyone in Pictou County,” said Pat Lee, CEO of the Pictou County Health Authority. “We expect to receive a regular, steady supply of vaccination with the goal to immunize the majority of Pictou County residents. Getting the H1N1 vaccine is the best way to protect yourself and your family.”

    The health authority will begin immunizing its staff on Wednesday as well. The H1N1 vaccine is available for free to all Nova Scotians who want it.

    Seasonal flu shots will be offered at the same time as the H1N1 vaccine to those people who are considered high risk for seasonal flu.

    Pictou County residents with questions about the vaccines and immunization programs can go to www.gov.ns.ca/h1n1, www.pcha.nshealth.ca or call HealthLink 811.
    People are asked not to come to the clinic if they are sick or have flu symptoms. Anyone wishing to have the vaccine must bring their health card with them.

    The current schedule is:
    Oct 28-29: Westville town hall, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
    Oct. 30: Pictou Landing First Nations community gymnasium, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
    Nov. 2-6: Museum of Industry, Stellarton, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
    Nov. 7: Museum of Industry, Stellarton, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
    Nov. 9-10: Thorburn Union Presbyterian Church Hall, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
    Nov. 12-13: Scotsburn Elementary School Gymnasium, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
    Nov. 14: Scotsburn Elementary School Gymnasium, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
    Nov. 16-18: Pictou United Church Hall, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
    Nov. 19-20: Pictou County YMCA in New Glasgow, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
    Nov. 21: Pictou County YMCA in New Glasgow, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
    Nov. 23-24: Trenton Rink Annex, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
    Nov. 25-27: NSCC gymnasium, Stellarton, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.
    Nov. 28: NSCC gymnasium, Stellarton: 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


    http://www.ngnews.ca/index.cfm?sid=297178&sc=49#
    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

      Last updated at 7:35 PM on 25/10/09

      Flu, H1N1 clinics scheduled for local area

      SHERRY MARTELL
      The Truro Daily News

      TRURO – The Colchester East Hants Health Authority will roll out its H1N1 and seasonal flu immunization campaign on Monday.

      The majority of public health staff in the district has been freed up from their daily roles to focus on supporting the mass immunization clinics.

      “My understanding is that our district is one of the first, if not the first, to be starting these clinics and our entire team is to be commended for their efforts to make these clinics happen as quickly as possible,” said Krista Wood, authority spokeswoman. “This is a monumental task and our staff and volunteers have really pulled together.”

      The H1N1 vaccine has received federal authorization, which means the government of Canada is satisfied the vaccine is safe and effective.
      Nova Scotia has ordered 1.4 million doses of the vaccine. The first shipment, 52,000 doses, arrived Oct. 19. The province will pay about $4.5 million for the vaccine.

      The authority has organized clinics that will be held during the next three weeks in Truro, Tatamagouche, Debert, Stewiacke, Millbrook, Elmsdale and Indian Brook.

      “Vaccination is the most important thing you can do to protect yourself and your loved ones from the risks of H1N1 and seasonal flu,” said Wood.

      “There are some indications that H1N1 flu activity is increasing, so it is vital that residents do all they can to protect themselves. This includes vaccination.”

      Visible signs of H1N1 activity are now being seen in the province. There have been 17 cases of H1N1 in the province since Aug. 29 and there has been one death in Nova Scotia associated with the virus.

      “It is absolutely essential that our residents take this seriously and take the measures that are available to protect themselves,” said the spokeswoman.

      “Our health-care system anticipates significant increases in demand as a result of complications from both H1N1 and seasonal flu.”

      She said like other organizations, they also anticipate many members of their staff may become ill.

      “When you combine increased demands with a reduced availability of care providers it is a huge concern, so preventing illness is paramount,” she said.

      Wood said the authority’s entire health-care team is working on plans to support the continued provision of vital services should this situation become a reality.

      http://www.trurodaily.com/index.cfm?sid=297253&sc=68
      "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
      -Nelson Mandela

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

        Kings flu, H1N1 clinics underway

        by Sara Keddy/Kings County Register
        Article online since October 24th 2009

        It’ll be a one-two pinch for Nova Scotians lining up for H1N1 and seasonal flu vaccines.

        "Every Nova Scotian who wants the H1N1 vaccine will be able to receive it," Dr. Robert Strang, the province's chief public health officer, said Oct. 21.

        Nova Scotia begins its biggest immunization campaign this week with the federal authorization for H1N1 vaccine.

        "I have every confidence that the H1N1 vaccine is safe and effective," said Strang. "It is the best way to protect yourself and your community."

        District health authorities have organized community immunization clinics. The first Kings clinic is in Kentville at the fire hall Oct. 29, then again Nov. 16; or line up in Canning (Glooscap elementary) Nov. 3 or 17, at the Acadia auxiliary gym, Wolfville, Nov. 4 or 23; the Berwick fire hall Nov. 5 or 24, at the New Minas Baptist Church Nov. 10 or 26, at the Kingston fire hall Nov. 12 or 25. All clinics are between 1 p.m. and 8 p.m.

        Doctors may also offer the vaccine in their offices.

        Groups at high risk for seasonal flu can receive that vaccine at the same time.

        WEBLINKS

        www.gov.ns.ca

        http://www.novanewsnow.com/article-3...-underway.html
        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
        -Nelson Mandela

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

          Last updated at 3:55 PM on 27/10/09
          Some public health services suspended or reduced
          Halifax News Net


          Over the next several weeks, Capital Health’s Public Health Services will lead the largest vaccination campaign ever to take place in Nova Scotia, immunizing hundreds of thousands of people against H1N1 influenza.

          We are already responding to H1N1 influenza illness reports in communities across this district and are continuing to see children and young adults affected far more than would usually be the case with other influenza strains.

          Public Health departments around the province worked together on common business continuity plans in the expectation of a major effort this fall focussing on prevention of H1N1 and the potential for serious illness. With the arrival of the second wave of H1N1 in Nova Scotia, we have enacted those plans.

          As a result, some services regularly offered by Public Health have been suspended or reduced:

          § Public Health prenatal classes are suspended (the IWK Health Centre will continue to host labour and delivery classes--part of the regular prenatal class series--and Birth Pre-Admission Clinic sessions. As usual, please call 481-5842 to book prenatal labour and delivery classes. Prenatal Classes offered by Family Resource Centres are continuing).
          § Routine postpartum home visits in the community are suspended with the exception of those for vulnerable families (all mothers will be visited by a Public Health nurse before discharge from the IWK. The nurse will discuss individual support needs and inform families of available community resources).
          § Drop-in clinics at Family Resource Centres are suspended.
          § Vision screening of children in elementary school is deferred until January 2010.
          § School Health Program staff including Youth Health Centre coordinators will be available to their schools one day per week
          § International Travel Clinic is reduced to one day per week, offering yellow fever, completion of vaccine series where necessary, and TB testing.
          § Menu assessments for licensed child care centres will be delayed.
          § Delays are to be expected in all health promotion programs.
          § Contact with workplaces will continue where possible, including information and resources regarding H1N1.

          In addition to ongoing supports for expectant and new mothers offered by the IWK, resources such as Loving Care books are available for pick up at all public libraries, public health office and the IWK Family Resource Library (main floor, Women’s Building). Online resources are available through www.cdha.nshealth.ca/publichealth. Breastfeeding clinics are being offered by Public Health nurses six days a week at various community sites (call 481-5852 for information on clinics or breastfeeding support).

          The services that will continue include:
          § Immunization program for grade 10 students.
          § Surveillance and follow-up of notifiable diseases as required by law.


          "We're very concerned about the impact that these program changes will have on our clients and partners, and ultimately our community," said Linda Young, director of Public Health Services at Capital Health. "We've made every effort to continue those programs which support children, youth and families, including our contact with all new mothers at the IWK. We are also maintaining a presence in other areas like schools and Youth Health Centres and we're committed to returning to our normal operations as soon as we possibly can."


          The delivery of H1N1 vaccination is the Public Health priority for the next few weeks. A complete schedule of H1N1 and seasonal flu vaccination clinics from now until December is posted at www.cdha.nshealth.ca and www.iwk.nshealth.ca.
          It is expected that regular programming of Public Health Services will resume no later than January 3, 2010.

          http://www.halifaxnewsnet.ca/index.c...=298030&sc=608
          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
          -Nelson Mandela

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

            Pregnant? You can get your H1N1 shot right away

            Special clinic set up at IWK

            By JEFFREY SIMPSON Provincial Reporter
            Thu. Oct 29 - 4:46 AM

            Pregnant women will be able to get H1N1 vaccinations earlier than expected in Halifax as a response to the continued spread of the flu this week.

            Such women are at a higher risk of developing serious health complications from the so-called swine flu, so they’ll be able to get the vaccine today and Friday at the IWK Health Centre in Halifax.

            "We put pregnant women in a tough position by recommending they get vaccinated," Dr. Robert Strang, the province’s chief public health officer, said Wednesday.

            "At least in the Halifax area, pregnant women didn’t really have a chance this week. So (health officials) stepped up and will be offering clinics."

            RELATED
            » LINK: Find out where to get vaccinated in your area
            » COMPLETE COVERAGE: Swine flu pandemic

            The clinics will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on both days at the O.E. Smith Auditorium at the IWK.
            Everybody else in the Halifax area who wants a shot will still have to wait until next week.

            Dr. Strang is urging pregnant women past the halfway mark to get immunized immediately, even though the vaccine now available has an adjuvant that boosts the body’s immune system but hasn’t been tested on pregnant women. Health Canada has expressed confidence that it’s safe.

            Dr. Strang also said women in the first half of their pregnancy who have chronic health conditions should also get vaccinated now instead of waiting until next week when the province expects to get a batch of vaccine without the adjuvant.

            In addition to pregnant women, children under five and adults under 65 with chronic health conditions are at higher risk from the flu.
            Anyone else should wait a bit longer for their shot, he said.

            "Ultimately we want all Nova Scotians to get immunized," Dr. Strang said.

            "We will have opportunities for all Nova Scotians and we certainly will have vaccine for all Nova Scotians. But this is a mass campaign that will take several weeks to run."

            The Capital district health authority and the IWK Health Centre will also open the first flu assessment centre today at noon at the Halifax Forum.

            Staff at the site, at Windsor and Almon streets, will provide advice for people suffering from flu symptoms, thereby alleviating stress on hospitals and doctors’ offices and preventing further infection. But they won’t be testing for H1N1.

            Dr. Strang is advising people not to get tested for H1N1 because it’s unnecessary and consumes health care resources that would be better used for other purposes.

            "It will not change what advice you’re given by a doctor or the treatment," he said.

            H1N1 has spread further in the province this week, especially in the Halifax region and the Guysborough-Antigonish-Strait area. But people who have been ill and are now well enough to go back to work or class shouldn’t have to provide notes from their physician, Dr. Strang said.

            "We have a health care system that needs to address serious issues," he said.

            "We do not have the capacity to have a lot of people who are well going into doctors’ offices just to get a sick note."

            Dr. Strang said the province has worked hard in recent months to inform doctors about H1N1 and to ensure that the doctors are not offering advice that conflicts with the province’s message.

            "Our basic message is, if you’re sick, stay home," Dr. Strang said. "If you’re well, even if you’ve been exposed, go about your daily business.

            "But certainly if you’ve been exposed or possibly been exposed, watch very carefully for symptoms. And if you start to come down with symptoms, then stay home."

            Dr. Ross Layton, the president of Doctors Nova Scotia, said some physicians may have advised patients against being immunized or may have told them to stay home if they’ve been exposed to someone with the flu.

            "Even though they have all the education, there are still people with some solid opinions about things and you’re not going to change them with science," Dr. Layton said.

            The only people who shouldn’t get vaccinated are people who have had severe allergic reactions to flu shots or eggs and those who have previously had a lab-confirmed case of H1N1, Dr. Strang said.

            Staffing at the 811 help line has also been increased to deal with the heavy volume of calls so more people can get timely advice, he said. A schedule of H1N1 and seasonal vaccination clinics is posted online at www.gov.ns.ca/hpp/h1n1/h1n1-clinics.asp.


            http://thechronicleherald.ca/News/1150037.html
            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
            -Nelson Mandela

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

              Vaccine shortage limits swine flu shots in N.S. next week to priority patients


              October 30, 2009 3:45 p.m.
              <!-- ARTICLE BODY --><SCRIPT language=javascript> try { Prop8="False" } catch(err) { } </SCRIPT>

              HALIFAX, N.S. - With a looming shortage of vaccine next week and public clinics set to open in Halifax and area on Monday, Nova Scotia health officials are restricting access to swine flu shots.

              Chief public health officer Dr. Robert Strang says the immunization program will be restricted to those who are considered to be at high risk.

              People in the designated high risk categories include pregnant women, children under five, people living in First Nations communities and health care workers.

              Strang says people who show up at clinics who are not in those groups will not be vaccinated.

              To date the province has received 160,000 doses of adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine from the national supplier and expects to receive another 12,500 doses next week, but that is significantly less than expected.

              Strang says people should check ads in newspapers and a government website over the weekend for any reductions in hours or in the number of clinics in their area because of the vacccine shortage.

              http://www.metronews.ca/vancouver/li...ority-patients
              "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
              -Nelson Mandela

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                Nova Scotia Limits H1N1 Vaccine To 4 Main Risk Groups

                Source: Government of Nova Scotia
                Posted on: 2nd November 2009

                Because of national vaccine supply issues, Nova Scotia is changing its immunization strategy.

                Starting Monday, Nov. 2, H1N1 vaccine will be limited to those most at risk from the virus. These are:
                • Pregnant women
                • Children younger than five (from six months to 59 months)
                • People living in First Nations communities
                • Health-care workers in district health authorities, long-term care facilities and home-care agencies who provide direct care to patients. This includes family physicians, family practice nurses, pharmacists and pharmacy technicians.
                People who do not belong to one of these groups will not receive vaccine at this time.

                The province will re-assess its vaccine supply on an ongoing basis, and will offer immunization later to other groups, based on risk, as vaccine supply allows.

                “Today, because of the changing supply of vaccine, we’re adjusting our strategy to protect the most vulnerable Nova Scotians first,” said Dr. Robert Strang, the province’s chief public health officer.

                “I know people are concerned and have questions. I ask for Nova Scotians’ patience, calm and understanding as we work through these challenges.”

                Physicians’ offices will not receive H1N1 vaccine until further notice. Physicians who have received vaccine will be asked to only immunize people in the groups listed. Workplace immunization clinics for H1N1 will be postponed until further notice.

                Nova Scotians should watch for advertisements in their community, or visit www.gov.ns.ca/h1n1, for the most up-to-date information on community immunization clinics.

                As of today, Oct. 30, Nova Scotia has received 160,000 doses of adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine. The province expects to receive 12,500 doses of adjuvanted vaccine and 5,400 of unadjuvanted next week, significantly less than expected.

                Vaccine is being delivered to the provinces and territories weekly by the Public Health Agency of Canada, after each batch is quality tested. The supply each province receives is based on population.

                Dr. Strang said those not immunized right away should still take precautions to avoid illness:
                • Wash hands often with soap and water, especially after a sneeze or cough. When soap and water are not handy, alcohol-based hand sanitizers are an acceptable alternative.
                • Cough and sneeze into elbow or sleeve.
                • If using tissues, dispose of them appropriately and wash hands.
                • Limit touching eyes, nose and mouth.
                • Do not share drinking glasses, water bottles, mouth guards, cosmetics or eating utensils.
                • Those with flu-like symptoms who are younger than five, pregnant, or younger than 65 with a chronic medical condition for which they receive regular medical care, should go to a family physician’s office, walk-in clinic or flu assessment centre.
                • People with severe flu-like symptoms, such as shortness of breath, chest pain, dizziness, severe vomiting, high fever for more than three days, and confusion, should call 911 or go immediately to the local emergency room.
                • People with flu-like symptoms who are otherwise healthy should stay home until they are feeling well. If their condition worsens, they should seek medical care.
                • http://thegovmonitor.com/health/nova...ups-13245.html
                "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                -Nelson Mandela

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                  ‘There is H1N1 in the Valley’

                  Vaccine clinics shift gears to needle risk groups first

                  by Sara Keddy/Kings County Register
                  View all articles from Sara Keddy/Kings County Register
                  Article online since November 3rd 2009, 11:43


                  Among those attending a flu shot clinic at the Centennial Medical Clinic in North Kentville Oct. 31 was Kentville Mayor Dave Corkum. He received his seasonal flu shot at the clinic; he had hoped to get his H1N1 vaccination at the same time, but a change in regulations Friday temporarily limited H1N1 shots to pregnant women, children under five, health care workers and natives on reserves. J.DeCoste





                  Kings County Register

                  The best most of us are going to get this week is limited: only people in risk groups will be getting the H1N1 vaccinations

                  The worst we could get: the H1N1 flu itself.

                  “We hear from physicians and they are tracking an increase in emergency rooms,” says Dr. Richard Gould, the medical officer of health for Western Nova Scotia.

                  “There is H1N1 in the Valley.”

                  Annapolis Valley Health, in fact, opened a separate walk-in assessment clinic at the Eastern Kings Memorial Health Centre in Wolfville October 31. The centre is open from 12:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. and is meant for people with mild to moderate flu-like symptoms who feel they need to see a healthcare worker. Emergency departments at Valley Regional and the Western Kings Memorial Health Centre will redirect anyone with flu-like symptoms to Wolfville. On its first day open, the centre saw 20 people; by Sunday and Monday, between 70 and 80 people were walking through the doors. Of those, one-third were under the age of five.

                  “We opened the clinic at the right time,” Dr. Lynne Harigan, vice president of medicine for AVH, said Nov. 3.

                  “We were seeing it as a surge in our ERs in the district, and when flu cases hit over 20 per cent of the visits, it was a heads-up flu is coming.”

                  Setting priorities

                  AVH is also following a national shift to limit H1N1 vaccinations for the immediate future to those in risk groups only. A huge line in Kentville at the Valley’s first immunization clinic Oct. 29 was shut down early in the evening, leaving many who had been standing for hours out of luck.

                  “It’s only going to get worse,” says Fred Harvie of New Minas, who was one of those turned away within 100 feet of the door after a three-and-a-half-hour wait. Looking at the list of provincial clinics, and estimating each is seeing about 450 people a day: “You do the math - there are enough clinics to do 12,000 people.

                  “The delivery system is shameful - they should double the number of people delivering the shots and get the lines down. I have very little chance of getting the shot at a Kings County clinic.”

                  At the Middleton clinc Nov. 2, 446 people received the H1N1 vaccine, while 227 people had the seasonal flu shot - all of them in risk groups.

                  “That clinic went really well with the prioritization, but the situation is changing almost hourly, sometimes,” says Tamara Gilley, AVH’s spokeswoman.

                  ‘Don’t fret’

                  Gould agrees there has been a heightened sense of panic as the second wave of H1N1 illness rises - as expected, but “don’t fret.

                  “There has been a little bit of overreaction, but it’s not totally unwarranted: H1N1 in some people can be quite serious. We can’t trivialize that.

                  “But getting the flu is not inevitable.”

                  The precautions health officials are advertising - washing hands with soap and water, coughing and sneezing into a sleeve and keeping a few feet between you and someone with flu symptoms - will “buy you time.

                  “If you can’t get the needle until the end of November, this flu is no more infectious than normal flu. People need to be reassured.

                  “You’re not in danger.”

                  If you’re sick

                  And for those who do become ill, there is a large enough supply of Tamiflu to help those with the most severe symptoms, Gould says. Healthcare staffing is being reviewed, with retired nurses and doctors adding their names to lists for extra help if needed at immunization clinics and institutions. Non-essential projects are also on hold.

                  If you’re sick, stay home until the worst of the symptoms improve, which could take two or three days. Healthcare workers are still being asked to take seven days off. A lingering cough, say, doesn’t mean you’re still infectious if peers in the workplace, school or community are looking at you with suspicion, Gould says.

                  Vaccine is coming

                  Government is telling all Canadians there is enough vaccine to immunize everyone who wants it; this week’s “glitch,” as Harrigan calls it, was unforseen, as vaccine manufacturers switched production methods to issue a limited supply of antigen-free vaccine.

                  “The federal government will reassess its stockpile Wednesday, the provinces will know Thursday and we’ll find out here in our district Friday how to distribute it for the next period,” Harrigan says.

                  “This is thinking on your feet, but nothing has surprised us. We’ve been planning since May.”

                  Scheduled clinics

                  Annapolis Valley Health is sticking to the same schedule of H1N1 and seasonal flu vaccination clinics it set two weeks ago, but only people in risk groups will be needled. The authority anticipates a supply if H1N1 vaccine will arrive next week for a return to full service clinics.

                  For seasonal flu, people over age 65 and long-term care residents are at the first of the line.

                  For the H1N1 vaccine, risk groups include those younger than five, pregnant women, health care workers, people living in First Nations communities and people younger than 65 with a chronic medical condition.

                  All clinics are open between 1 p.m. and 8 p.m.

                  • Annapolis Royal fire hall, Nov. 9 and 18

                  • Bridgetown Legion, Nov. 17

                  • Middleton NSCC, Nov. 19

                  • Kingston fire hall, November 12 and 25

                  • Berwick fire hall, November 5 and 24

                  • Kentville fire hall, November 16

                  • New Minas Baptist Church, November 10 and 26

                  • Canning (Glooscap elementary), November 17

                  • Wolfville (Acadia auxiliary gym), November 4 and 23


                  http://www.novanewsnow.com/article-3...he-Valley.html
                  "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                  -Nelson Mandela

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                    N.S. tries to explain ever-changing vaccine rollout
                    People with chronic illnesses could get vaccine later this week

                    Last Updated: Wednesday, November 4, 2009 AT

                    CBC News


                    Health officials estimate nine per cent of Nova Scotians have been vaccinated. (CBC)

                    Nova Scotia's chief public health officer says he understands people are confused, frustrated and angry about the way the province is distributing the swine flu vaccine.

                    "They may feel that every day that we are changing our decisions and they're not sure why we're changing," Dr. Robert Strang said at a news conference Tuesday.

                    Strang said the province was blindsided when told about the sudden shortfall of the H1N1 vaccine last Friday and had to decide how to maximize the vaccine supply that remained.

                    Nova Scotia abruptly shifted gears, limiting vaccinations to children between six and 59 months old, pregnant women, those in First Nations and health-care workers providing direct care to patients.

                    Strang said the province had about 80,000 doses of the vaccine left on

                    Friday, which was simply not enough to inoculate all Nova Scotians under the age of 65 suffering from chronic health conditions — a group previously described as high-risk.

                    According to the Department of Health Promotion and Protection, 472,279 fall into that category — more than half the province's population.

                    In contrast, Nova Scotia has a combined total of 88,000 pregnant women, First Nations people, front-line health-care workers and children between six months and 59 months, and this number could reasonably be covered with the remaining vaccine, Strang said.

                    He said health officials have been losing sleep over the difficult decisions they've had to make.

                    "It's been a very tough time for our team, making these kinds of decisions," he said. "A lot of us aren't sleeping very well at night because this puts people at some risk.

                    "It does not sit well with us as health-care providers to have to say no to some folks, but that is the reality what we're dealing with and we're moving to be able to say yes as soon as possible.

                    More vaccine coming

                    Nova Scotia received 5,400 doses of the adjuvant-free vaccine for pregnant women on Tuesday and is expecting an additional 13,500 doses of the adjuvated version later this week.

                    Strang said some people with chronic conditions will be vaccinated when that happens, but the province will again limit distribution to those who need it most.

                    "In that group, there's many layers of people at different risk," he said.

                    People receiving chemotherapy, children with cystic fibrosis and those with severely suppressed immune systems will be among those who will be included in the expanded high-risk group, Strang said.

                    Health officials estimate more than 82,000 people, or about nine per cent of the population, have been vaccinated in Nova Scotia.

                    http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia...planation.html
                    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                    -Nelson Mandela

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                      <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD height=10>Last updated at 5:04 PM on 05/11/09 </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
                      H1N1 Vaccination Clinics Friday and Saturday for high risk groups in the Capital Health district
                      Halifax News Net

                      H1N1 vaccine will be available for high risk groups in the Capital Health district at clinics Friday and Saturday:

                      Friday, Nov. 6

                      · East Dartmouth Community Centre, Dartmouth 1:30 pm - 7:30 pm, o Room 103 and 105A, B & C, Lower Level

                      · Captain William Spry Community Centre, Spryfield - 1:30pm to 7:30pm, Community Meeting Room - Main Entrance

                      · St. Andrew's Centre 1:30 pm – 7:30 pm, Multipurpose Room

                      · Newbridge Academy (in the Sackville Sports Stadium) - 1:30pm-7:30pm, Gym - Hockeytown Entrance

                      Saturday, Nov. 7

                      · East Dartmouth Community Centre, Dartmouth 1:30 pm - 7:30 pm, Room 103 and 105A, B & C, Lower Level

                      · Captain William Spry Community Centre, Spryfield - 1:30pm to 7:30pm, Community Meeting Room - Main Entrance

                      · St. Andrew's Centre 2:00 pm – 7:30 pm, Multipurpose Room

                      · Newbridge Academy (in the Sackville Sports Stadium) - 1:30pm-7:30pm, Gym - Hockeytown Entrance

                      · Saint Mary’s University 8:30 am – 2:30 pm, o Loyola building, through the Sobey building front entrance


                      Flu Assessment Centres are open daily at:

                      Halifax
                      Maritime Hall at the Halifax Forum, 6209 Almon Street in Halifax
                      Hours: 9:30am to 7:30pm

                      Dartmouth
                      202 Brownlow Avenue, Unit C-CR (Next to Staples in Burnside, facing onto Burnside Drive)Hours: 9:30am to 7:30pm

                      Flu-like symptoms are fever and/or cough, and one or more of the following: unusual tiredness, headache, muscle or joint aches, sore throat, vomiting and diarrhea in children less than five years of age.
                      If you are otherwise healthy, and experiencing these symptoms, please stay at home and take care of yourself. If you need medical assistance, please go to the Assessment Centres in Halifax or Dartmouth. If you are outside the metro area and require care, please contact your family physician or go to your nearest Emergency Department.
                      Health professionals at the Assessment Centres will assess patients for flu and H1N1. They will provide advice on what you need to do to get better and they may also provide treatment. If you require additional care or follow-up, they will provide the referral. The Assessment Centre is not providing vaccinations for seasonal or H1N1 flu, is not swabbing patients to confirm H1N1 and will not offer inpatient care.
                      As with any medical emergency, if you are severely ill, you should seek immediate help by going to your nearest Emergency Department or calling 911.


                      http://www.halifaxnewsnet.ca/index.c...=300895&sc=608
                      "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                      -Nelson Mandela

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                        Two more community H1N1 clinics added to this week's schedule

                        Clinics this week in Digby, Lockeport, Barrington and Pubnico

                        Article online since November 9th 2009, 16:39





                        Two more community H1N1 clinics added to this week's schedule
                        Clinics this week in Digby, Lockeport, Barrington and Pubnico

                        South West Health has added two more community H1N1 flu shot clinics to ones already scheduled for this week.

                        Added is a clinic at the Barrington and Islands Fire Hall on Friday, Nov. 13 from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., and one at the Pubnico Legion on Saturday, Nov. 14 from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.

                        These clinics, and the others taking place this week (Monday and Tuesday from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Digby Curling Centre and Thursday, Nov. 12 from 3-7 p.m. at the Lockeport Fire Hall) are only for the people in the high-risk priority groups identified by the province.

                        These groups include:

                        •Children 19 or younger with chronic medical conditions;

                        •Women who have just given birth, and their partners;

                        •Pregnant women (including those that are four weeks postpartum);

                        •Children from 6 months to under five years of age;

                        •Front-line healthcare workers;

                        •First Nations communities.

                        The priority list will expand as more vaccine becomes available.

                        ALSO NOTE: The Flu Assessment Clinic at the Yarmouth Hospital is open from 1 to 5 p.m. seven days a week. No appointment is needed but do bring your health card.

                        Also attached is the new Influenza Decision Chart to help people decided when and where to seek treatment for flu:

                        gov.ns.ca

                        The public is also reminded not to visit the Yarmouth hospital if you are sick. As well, the health district has limited visitors to just two per patient.


                        http://www.novanewsnow.com/article-3...-schedule.html
                        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                        -Nelson Mandela

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                          More Nova Scotians eligible for H1N1 shot

                          Health minister says some won't be vaccinated until new year

                          Last Updated: Wednesday, November 11, 2009 | 12:52 AM AT

                          CBC News


                          Nova Scotia expects nearly 52,000 more doses of H1N1 vaccine next week. (CBC)


                          Nova Scotia added three new groups to its H1N1 vaccine eligibility list Tuesday, including those under 65 with chronic medical conditions.

                          Dr. Robert Strang, the province's chief public health officer, gave the details at a news conference Tuesday afternoon.

                          People living with those who have compromised immune systems and people living with and caring for infants less than six months of age may also be inoculated. The last addition includes people who work in residential-care facilities and group homes.

                          Strang said the changes are effective immediately.

                          Pregnant women, children between the ages of five months and 59 months, people under the age of 19 with chronic health conditions, people in First Nations communities and front-line health workers continue to be eligible for the vaccine.

                          With the inclusion of the three new high-risk groups, there are now more than 470,000 Nova Scotians who can be inoculated.

                          Strang said there are about 66,500 doses of the vaccine currently available and the province may run out before the week is done.

                          "It's entirely possible we may run out of vaccine before we run out of eligible people who want to get it this week," he said. "But I would rather see us run out of vaccine than have it sit in fridges where it won't protect anyone."

                          The province narrowed the list to only priority groups because of a Canada-wide vaccine shortfall. As of Tuesday, Nova Scotia has received 207,400 doses of H1N1 vaccine and about 15 per cent of the population has been inoculated.

                          Strang said officials were originally expecting to receive between 350,000 and 450,000 doses by this time.

                          Immunizing in new year

                          Maureen MacDonald, the province's health minister, said it could be well after the flu season has passed before everyone in Nova Scotia will be able to receive a vaccination against swine flu.

                          "We still have a ways to go," she said. "This program will continue all of this month and well into December and possibly beyond."

                          MacDonald refused to be critical of the federal government's handling of the H1N1 immunization program or of GlaxoSmithKline, the company hired to supply vaccine to the country.

                          "We didn't plan for the flu to hit us this time. We don't have any control," she said. "We have no control over when the flu actually emerges in the population."

                          She said the vaccine was only ready in the last week of October when evidence of the second wave of the flu was already seen in Nova Scotia.
                          Immunization clinics will be closed Wednesday for Remembrance Day, but H1N1 assessment centres will be open.

                          Strang's latest update comes as Nova Scotia records its second H1N1-related death — the firstto occur during the second wave of the pandemic this fall.

                          The patient who died was a woman in her 50s who lived in the Guysborough Antigonish Strait Health district. She died last Friday after spending several days in the intensive-care unit of an Antigonish hospital.

                          She had underlying health conditions, Strang said Monday.

                          Annette Sampson, who died in July, was the province's first recorded death linked to H1N1. She was also in her 50s and had underlying medical conditions.


                          http://www.cbc.ca/canada/nova-scotia...ne-groups.html
                          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                          -Nelson Mandela

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                            South West Health H1N1 flu immunization clinic schedule

                            Article online since November 13rd 2009, 12:50




                            South West Health H1N1 flu immunization clinic schedule


                            South West Health has issued its latest schedule for H1N1 flu clinics in Yarmouth, Digby and Shelburne counties. These clinics are for the groups that have been identified at this point as being eligible for the flu vaccine.

                            Due to the limited supply of vaccine, health officials have placed those at high-risk of developing complications from H1N1 at the head of the line. All others will be vaccinated as the supply becomes available.

                            The schedule is:

                            Barrington and Island Fire Hall: Friday, Nov 13 from 3 pm to 7 pm

                            Pubnico Legion:Saturday, Nov 14 from 12 pm to 4 pm

                            Yarmouth Lions Club: Monday, Nov 16 from 2 to 6 p.m.

                            Weymouth Legion: Tuesday, Nov 17 from 1 to 6 p.m.

                            Tusket, Ecole Belleville: Wednesday, Nov 18 from 3 to 7 p.m.

                            Wedgeport Legion: Thursday, Nov 19 from 1 to 6 p.m.

                            Carleton Legion: Friday, Nov 20 from 1 to 6 p.m.

                            Barrington & Island Fire Hall: Saturday, Nov 21 from 12 to 4 p.m.



                            South West Health cautions the public that the clinic Schedule may change on short notice due to vaccine supply. Changes to the flu shot clinic schedule will be posted on

                            www.swndha.nshealth.ca

                            Any changes to the schedule will also be posted on NovaNewsNow.com

                            People in the following groups are eligible to receive H1N1 vaccine:

                            •people younger than 65 with chronic medical conditions

                            •people living with, or providing care in the home for, infants less than six months of age, people living with those at high-risk who cannot be immunized, and those who are immuno-compromised and may not respond to vaccine;

                            •people who work in residential-care facilities, community-based option and small-option homes, group homes and developmental residences.

                            •pregnant women, and women up to four weeks postpartum and their partner

                            •women who have just given birth, and their partner

                            •children aged six months to younger than five years old

                            •children 19 or younger with chronic medical conditions for which they receive regular medical attention

                            •people living on First Nations communities

                            •Front-line health-care workers

                            Note: The Yarmouth Hospital Flu Assessment Clinic is open seven days a week from 1-5 p.m. People with mild flu symptoms should stay home until they feel better. If your illness gets worse, and you need to see a health care professional, you can visit the Flu Assessment Clinic instead of the Emergency Department. No appointment needed, but please bring your Health Card.

                            http://www.novanewsnow.com/article-i...-schedule.html
                            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                            -Nelson Mandela

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Nova Scotia - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                              Seniors worried not yet on H1N1 list
                              Strang says older people are next group to receive vaccination
                              By EVA HOARE Staff Reporter
                              Sat. Nov 14 - 4:46 AM
                              <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=200 align=left><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=10 width="100%" bgColor=#ffffff><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top bgColor=#f0f0f0><IMG title="Dr. Robert Strang
                              " src="http://thechronicleherald.ca/photos/large/ARC_ING050209swine3_Provincial_11-14-09_7GD3QC8.jpg" border=0>

                              Dr. Robert Strang



                              </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD><TD>


                              </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>Some Nova Scotia seniors are getting concerned they haven’t yet received the H1N1 vaccine.

                              "I’ve been getting a few emails. The feeling seems to be the same; are we getting shoved aside?" said Mary Fleck, president of the Federation of Senior Citizens and Pensioners of Nova Scotia.

                              Mrs. Fleck said no one is trying to queue jump, but seniors hope provincial health officials will soon let them know when it’s their turn to get the shot.

                              "I have to reiterate, I do not want to get it ahead of others," Mrs. Fleck said Friday from her Inverness home.

                              "I want to be sure the others who need it, get it," she said. "I want to be sure those babies, those small children, the pregnant mothers — yes, they should have it first. But I don’t like this idea; if you’re over 65, forget about it."

                              Many seniors would feel a lot better if they had an idea when they could get vaccinated, said Mrs. Fleck, who’s also third vice-president of the National Federation of Pensioners and Senior Citizens Federation.

                              Dr. Robert Strang, chief medical health officer for Nova Scotia, said Friday that seniors are the "next big group" in line for immunization, combined with essential services workers such as police officers and firefighters.

                              "I certainly appreciate where they’re coming from," he said, referring to seniors’ concerns.

                              Seniors have the lowest likelihood of being infected by H1N1, but once hit with the virus are at "highest risk for severe disease," he said.

                              Dr. Strang said it was emphasized during a conference call Friday of national pandemic strategists that seniors should be immunized next.
                              Dr. Strang said 34,000 more vaccine doses are coming in late Monday or early Tuesday and there may be "an additional amount on top of that" shortly.

                              Earlier this week, Nova Scotia’s health minister said it could be February when all Nova Scotians receive their H1N1 shots.

                              The vaccine was originally distributed to a number of com-munity centres, but after a week, a countrywide shortage forced health officials to restrict it to pregnant women, children under five, front-line health-care workers and First Nations people.

                              The program here was expanded late this week to include those under 65 with chronic conditions. Also included are people living with or providing care for infants under six months; people living with those at high risk who cannot be immunized (for ex., those with severe egg allergies), and those who are immunocompromised and may not respond to the vaccine.

                              People who work in residential care facilities or community-based option and small options homes and group homes are now eligible for the shot, as are women who have given birth in the last four weeks, and their partners.

                              Health-care staffers at long-term care facilities and those employed by home-care agencies that provide direct care to patients may also be immunized. Family doctors and nurses, pharmacists and pharmacy technicians are getting vaccinated as well.

                              Mrs. Fleck said as the illness spreads throughout Nova Scotia many in her age group, including herself, are feeling worried.

                              Since swine flu broke out in Nova Scotia last April, two women in their 50s have died. Both had underlying health problems.

                              A Capital Health spokesman said Friday that doctors’ offices in the province previously qualified to distribute flu shots either had started receiving H1N1 doses, or would be in the coming days. The vaccine would be designated for the most vulnerable, John Gillis said in a news release.

                              http://thechronicleherald.ca/News/1152715.html
                              "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                              -Nelson Mandela

                              Comment

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