Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

    Another update on plans for mass immunization clinics against the H1N1 virus is coming today. Eastern Health has called a news conference for this morning at 10 to outline when and how the vaccine will be available to the public.

    The provincial government will make the vaccine available starting on Monday through special clinics and not through individual doctor's offices. Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Faith Stratton, says the province has received 28-thousand doses with more arriving in the next few days. Dr. Stratton says there are a number of people who are at higher risk and should get their vaccine as soon as possible, including people with respiratory illnesses, children, and pregnant women. Health Minister Jerome Kennedy is strongly urging people to get immunized. 28 new cases of H1N1 were reported in the last week (error in the media...28 new cases in one day which = a 25% increase in a day), raising the total number of cases in the province since June to 145. Most of those cases were mild, and there have only been 3 cases that required hospitalization.

    The Newfoundland and Labrador Medical Association goes along with the idea of mass clinics. Official Dr. Lydia Hatcher says she will definitely be availing of the vaccine as she suspects most of her colleagues will. She says if doctors had to vaccinate their full practice, they would be doing nothing but vaccinating 50 or 60 people per day and not providing regular medical services.

    The City of St. John's will be working in conjunction with Eastern Health in the event of any significant H1N1 pandemic.Mayor Dennis O'Keefe says city council has already been briefed by the health officials and St. John's is prepared to provide whatever is needed. O'Keefe says if the health authority needed a location for large care needs such as the convention center, the city would work to make that happen.

    Central Health says distribution of the H1N1 vaccine will begin this Monday and the first group to receive it will be health and community service workers. Immunization clinics in sixteen communities will begin the following Monday, November 2nd. Central Health says vaccinations are not mandatory but are recommended for all residents and will be offered free of charge.

    The Newfoundland and Labrador Employers' Council is holding a workshop in St.John's today on doctor's notes. Executive Director Richard Alexander says the workshop will delve into employer's rights and responsibilities in dealing with the medical system to return employees to work.

    http://www.vocm.com/newsarticle.asp?mn=2&ID=2211

  • #2
    Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

    Swine flu vaccination program begins in N.L.

    1,000 shots expected to be given by Eastern Health on Monday

    Last Updated: Monday, October 26, 2009 | 3:11 PM NT

    CBC News


    A health-care worker at a hospital in St. John's gets the H1N1 shot on Monday morning. (CBC)

    Newfoundland and Labrador's Health Department began its swine flu vaccination program Monday morning.

    Health-care workers were being offered the shots at special clinics that have been set up throughout the province.

    The program for the public begins next Monday.

    Eastern Health, the province's largest health board, responsible for services from St. John's to Bonavista on the northeast coast and Grand Bank on the south coast, expects to vaccinate up to 1,000 employees and volunteers on Monday alone.

    Immunization teams have been set up at some hospitals and nursing homes.

    Sonya Stanford, Eastern Health's acting director of occupational health and safety, said this week's efforts will go beyond people who are directly employed by the health board.

    "We actually have extended the invitation to other health-care workers in our region including ? our volunteers, our students, our private ambulance operators, our community physicians and their clerical support, and employees of the Canadian Blood Services," she said.

    "So, in total, there's probably 13,000 people over a two-week period that will have to be vaccinated."

    Some hospitals in the province are taking other measures against the H1N1 virus.

    Western Memorial in Corner Brook is banning most visitors because of the number of patients with flu-like symptoms.

    The health centre in Springdale did the same last week.

    http://www.cbc.ca/canada/newfoundlan...ts-261009.html
    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

      <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=4 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=NewsHeader>OCT 26 2009

      H1N1 Vaccination Program Underway

      <TABLE id=Table_01 height=22 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top width=126 height=22></TD><TD vAlign=top width=109 height=22></TD><TD vAlign=top align=right></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

      </TD></TR><TR><TD class=NewsDescription vAlign=top colSpan=2>

      The H1N1 virus vaccination program is underway. The first to be immunized will be health care workers. Clinics for the public begin next week. Chief Medical Officer Dr. Faith Stratton says in some smaller communities, the entire population will be immunized at once, while in larger centres, higher-risk groups are being encouraged to come forward first. Dr. Stratton says people are being strongly encouraged to get the shot. She admits a certain amount of resistance is still being expressed by some people about getting the vaccine. She says it's important to get reliable, scientific information in making a decision about whether or not to get the H1N1 shot.


      For the Western Health board, starting next week, priority groups such as those under 65 with chronic health conditions, small children and pregnant women will be vaccinated. School- age children will be vaccinated at their schools. Western Health says details on times and locations for mass immunization clinics in the region will be announced early this week.


      Central Health says 16 mass immunization clinics will be up and running next week. The specific times, dates and sites of these clinics are expected to be announced this week, along with information for those living in isolated communities and having no permanent health care services.


      Eastern Health says shots for residents of the Burin, Bonavista and Avalon Peninsulas will be available starting November 2nd. Details on the location and times for the clinics will be posted on the Eastern Health website and will be broadcast over the next few weeks.


      In Labrador, in some situations, teams will be used to go into some of the more remote areas to administer the H1N1 vaccine such as the north coast of Labrador. The province has assured that everyone who wishes to avail of the vaccine will be given an opportunity to do so.

      Visitors are being restricted at Western Memorial Regional Hospital due to the number of patients with flu-like symptoms . Dr. Minnie Wasmeir is the Chief Operating Officer with Western Health. She says the ban was necessary since some patients have tested positive for the H1N1 flu. Dr. Wasmeir says the big problem is that some people coming in to the hospital with colds and flu-like symptoms are not wearing masks properly. Dr. Wasmeir says there are 14 confirmed cases of H1N1 in the region and most of those are in Corner Brook.

      Central Health has imposed visitor restrictions at the Green Bay Health Centre in Springdale due to the presence of influenza-like illness. Only one visitor is permitted and they must be a member of the patient's immediate family. Children under 14 are not permitted to visit.

      http://www.vocm.com/newsarticle.asp?...=2297&latest=1


      </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
      "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
      -Nelson Mandela

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

        <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD height=10>Last updated at 8:27 AM on 27/10/09 </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
        Vaccinations begin
        Confusion continues as first shots are administered

        KERRI BREEN
        The Telegram

        In a makeshift clinic in the main lobby of the Health Sciences Centre, Eastern Health employees were among the first in the province to receive a new vaccine against H1N1 Monday.

        A steady stream of health-care workers lined up against a wall from 8:50 a.m. onward while nurses administered shots behind a blue partition.

        Most employees want to receive the vaccine, according to Sonya Stanford, acting director of occupational health and safety at Eastern Health. Some 13,000 health-care workers are expected to receive the shot in the next two weeks.

        On the street, however, it's a different story. In contrast to the orderly line of medical staff waiting for their shot at the Health Sciences, among members of the public there seems to be a fair amount of confusion.

        Tony Clarke, a cab driver for Bugdens, said people don't know what's in the vaccine.

        About half of the customers he speaks with in his cab are talking about H1N1, but about 80 per cent of them aren't interested in getting the shot because they are confused and skeptical about the drug and its safety, he said.

        The drug will be available to the public through mass immunization clinics as of Nov. 2.

        Clarke is holding out on getting the shot himself. The threat of swine flu is serious, but it hasn't really hit St. John's yet, he said.

        "It's nothing to sneeze at - pardon the pun," he said. "Eventually I think everybody's going to have to get the vaccine, there's no doubt about it. People are just too skeptical, they just don't know what's in it."

        At Memorial University, few of the students who spoke to The Telegram were planning to get the shot.

        Many were concerned about the short time frame in which the vaccine was developed, and are biding their time until more information is available.

        Some said they wouldn't get vaccinated because they didn't know anything about the vaccine or had heard conflicting information. Some said they didn't feel they needed it.

        First-year student Stephen Leamon said he doesn't trust the vaccine.

        "I've heard it's potentially dangerous in terms of its side-effects. It's fairly low-chance, but given I'm a low-risk candidate, I don't think it's worth the risk."

        Dr. Faith Stratton, the province's chief medical officer of health, has said the vaccine is safe. It was assessed in clinical trials prior to its release in Canada, and Stratton said most of the reactions that have been reported have been mild, such as a sore arm at the site of the injection, fever, fatigue and headache.

        The drug provides 85 per cent of those who take it immunity against swine flu within 10 days. The federal government approved the drug Oct. 21.

        As of Oct. 17, the H1N1 virus was responsible for 83 deaths in Canada, according to Canada's Public Health Agency - most of those who died were in high-risk categories, such as having pre-existing medical conditions which impaired their immune systems.

        One of the latest casualties, a pre-teen girl from eastern Ontario, died on the weekend.

        In this province, about 145 cases have been confirmed through lab tests since June.

        Christine Young, a third-year psychology student at MUN, said she will be getting the shot because she trusts the information that has been made available.

        She doesn't mind getting sick herself, but would like to do her part to make sure the virus doesn't spread.

        "It's not just to protect yourself, like if I come into contact with people that are more at-risk," she said.

        MUN student Alexander Troake said he's waiting to see how others react to it.

        "I just don't want to rush out and get it," he said.

        As an arts representative on the MUN students' union, he said he encourages students to get the shot, so long as they are comfortable with the manner in which it was approved and they don't mind needles.

        Meanwhile, at a St. John's shopping mall Monday, five of six friends - older adults - having lunch were more interested in the vaccine than the students.

        Georgina, who wished to be identified by her first name only, is asthmatic, so she said she has no other choice than to get it.

        Those with chronic health conditions are among those who will benefit most from the vaccine, according to Eastern Health.

        Elizabeth, who also asked that her surname not be used, said she'll get the shot "If I find out where to get it."

        She hopes the shots will be available at doctors' offices as well as at mass immunization clinics.

        Locations will be announced this week.

        At the Health Sciences Centre, nurse Eva Tucker said she researched the new drug and thinks getting immunized against swine flu was the right thing to do.

        "It's just not worth taking the chance. It's a good vaccine and I think we're really lucky to be in Canada where everybody gets it."

        Sonya Stanford, the acting director of occupational health and safety at Eastern Health, said it's important for health-care workers to get immunized to protect their families, themselves and patients.

        "We in health care have an obligation, we owe (it to) our patients to be prepared and not to spread it to them," she said.

        Despite educational efforts on Eastern Health's part, Stanford said some employees are confused or in doubt about the vaccine.

        Now that more information is available, she said, staff can make better informed decisions about receiving the vaccine.

        "I think there's still some people on the fence. I think though, more people are convinced now to get it than they were last week because I think last week it was this mysterious vaccine that people didn't really know much about."

        http://www.thetelegram.com/index.cfm?sid=297934&sc=79
        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
        -Nelson Mandela

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

          <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD height=10>Last updated at 8:35 AM on 27/10/09 </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
          H1N1 Facts
          ASHLEY FITZPATRICK
          The Telegram

          It is the pandemic flu everyone is talking about. What a star. And just like Brangelina or the cast of ?Twilight? could tell you, when it comes to the stars, there?s often more fiction floating around out there than actual fact.
          So what about the 2009 H1N1? Well, we?ve found everything you want to know and even some things you don?t.
          First thing is first: When it comes to this flu, don?t panic.
          This is a flu. Yes, it is not the regular seasonal flu. Yes, it can be dangerous. But, just like with the regular seasonal flu, you may do everything to prevent it and still get it (best to settle that in your mind right now).
          Deep breath in, deep breath out.
          Now, let?s get to the important questions.

          What is the Swine Flu vaccine?
          The vaccine in Canada is a mix of viral material (antigen) and a ?booster? component called adjuvant. It is referred to as a ?booster? because it generally helps your immune system in responding to the viral vaccine.
          Basically, know that the vaccine is a mix.
          The vaccine here is different than what is used in the United States. Therefore, reports on ?the vaccine? coming from television in the United States are not a good source of information for someone here.
          Canada?s vaccine is being manufactured by GlaxoSmithKlein under a contract that was signed in 2001, to be available in the case of a pandemic flu.

          Do I need it and is it safe?
          Boostered vaccines have gone to the World Health Organization. In June 2009, consultations were held with the organization and suppliers and, notes Canada?s public health agency, ?no significant safety concerns? were raised for the vaccine.
          The vaccine was been approved by Health Canada after the ?booster? addition with the viral bits was tested in 45,000 people around the world in the pre-pandemic period. According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, ?no significant safety concerns regarding the use of adjuvanted (boostered) vaccine were detected.?
          Should you get it? That is up to you.
          The Public Health Agency of Canada states on their site, ?we know that even in provinces with free universal access to vaccination programs, usually less than 50 per cent of the population will choose to be immunized.?
          On Monday, St. John?s-based Dr. Stephen Major said that he feels the vaccine is safe. ?Personally, I?m saying everyone should get the H1N1 vaccine,? he said.
          Major added he is hoping more than just the standard 50 per cent of people get vaccinated in the case of this program.
          ?If we get 70 per cent of people getting this vaccine, we get ?herd immunity? ? (in other words) if you have enough people who are immunized, you help protect other people from the virus.?
          He then noted the importance of everyone considering the preventative measure.
          ?Young, healthy people can die from this and we saw this yesterday in Ontario,? said Major. A pre-teen girl believed to have had the H1N1 virus, but no pre-existing medical condition, died Saturday in an Ottawa hospital.
          ?As soon as I can get in to get my vaccine, I?ll be there,? Major said. ?My kids are gonna get it and I think everyone should get it.?
          The provincial and federal governments are also recommending the shot.
          However, it will not be forced. The choice is yours.

          There is a shortage of vaccine in some places in the United States. Will there be a shortage here?
          No. Like apples and oranges, the vaccine available in the United States is different from the vaccine available here in Newfoundland (or Canada. It is the same vaccine across the country).
          ?The World Health Organization recommended countries use dose-sparing vaccines whenever possible. By developing an adjuvanted (?boostered?) vaccine, we use less of the virus material, allowing us to immunize more people in a timely manner,? states the Public Health Agency of Canada.
          ?Studies show that even the best unadjuvanted vaccines only protect six out of 10 people who get the shot. Experts believe an adjuvanted flu vaccine could boost protection rates to as high as nine in 10.?
          The adjuvanted vaccine was also produced faster.

          Wait. Isn?t there something different being recommended for pregnant women?
          The ?non-adjuvanted? vaccine (with no booster) is being made available for pregnant women only. That is because the flu vaccine with adjuvant is new in Canada (the booster part has been used before with other kinds of shots, like tetanus, just not the flu shot) and not enough data is available to say 100 per cent that it will mean the same thing.
          Yet health departments are already saying they feel there will not be a problem if pregnant women take the same vaccine as everyone else. In fact, they are recommending it for anyone in an area where a lot of people are getting the Swine Flu.
          If pregnant, whether you get the regular shot or not, the choice is yours.
          The non-adjuvanted vaccine is not yet available, but is expected to be available in flu shot centres within the first two weeks of November.

          Don?t older and ?high risk? people get the vaccine first? Then how do I know when to go get my shot?
          The high risk groups were generally encouraged to have the regular seasonal flu shot and then the H1N1 shot and, yes, they are supposed to have it before the rest of the population.
          For that group: for the regular flu shots, arrangements should have already been made, or should right away be made, through your doctor. For the H1N1 shot, you will likely be told how long to wait after your regular shot, but you should be able to have your H1N1 vaccination beginning the end of this week.
          For everyone else: general vaccinations are expected to begin being offered early next week. Locations and times are expected to be announced by radio first. You are being recommended to get just the H1N1 shot for now.
          ?The H1N1 we?re seeing right now in the community, so there?s much more risk you?re going to be exposed to that,? Major said.

          Do I go to the hospital or stay at home?
          If you suddenly feel flu symptoms and they are mild, the recommendation is home first. If you go to the hospital and have no underlying conditions and show no symptoms that cause concern, they will likely send you home anyway.
          Asked when people staying at home should seek medical assistance, the provincial Department of Health and Community Services would not give any particular guidelines on that. It is being left to personal judgment.
          However, in Prince Edward Island, health officials have suggested a few things to take notice of if you are at home with the flu.
          ?If you are very ill, or have a shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, chest pain, confusion, sudden dizziness, severe or persistent vomiting, you should seek medical attention,? states that province?s website for H1N1. ?In children, if they have very fast breathing or trouble breathing, bluish skin colour, are not drinking enough fluids, not waking up or not interacting, have increased irritability, fever with a rash or flu-like symptoms that improve and then return with fever and worse cough, then they should be seen immediately by a health-care provider.?
          Now ?increased irritability? is something teenagers can often suffer from, so the following recommendation from Newfoundland?s Dr. Faith Stratton may serve best: parents are the best judge of their kids? health. Likewise, you know yourself.
          If you are concerned, call your public health authority. If they put you on hold and you feel you can?t wait, it is probably a good sign you should go in to your local clinic or hospital.
          The bottom line is the health service is there for you.

          afitzpatrick@thetelegram.com

          Weblinks:
          www.fightflu.ca
          www.health.gov.nl.ca/health/hsi/default.


          htmhttp://www.thetelegram.com/index.cfm?sid=297936&sc=85
          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
          -Nelson Mandela

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

            Where to get the H1N1 vaccine in the St. John?s area

            Thu, Oct 29, 2009
            Elling Lien




            Our friends at Eastern Health have just released the details on their H1N1 public immunization program, and we?ve got the low-down on when and where to get your arm-pokin?.

            If you?re planning on getting the vaccine, here is some advice:

            - Bring your MCP card, if you gots one.
            - Don?t wear your wetsuit to the clinic. Wear clothes that give access to the upper arm, because that?s where they?ll be jabbing you.
            - There will be a lot of cars parking in the area, so consider walking, taking the bus, or going in a group.
            - Yes, there will be lots of waiting in lines, especially at the beginning. Bring something to help you pass the time.
            - Don?t be paranoid! You?ll be fine. Jeez.

            For more information, check out Eastern Health?s H1N1 page or call their Healthline at 1-888-709-2929.


            Clinic locations

            Monday to Thursday: 10am to 8pm
            Friday and Saturday: 10am to 6pm
            ?
            St. John?s east

            MacDonald Drive Junior High School MAP
            Nov 2 ? Nov 28
            ?
            St. John?s west

            Hazelwood Elementary (391 Topsail Rd) MAP
            Nov 2 ? Nov 28
            ?
            Paradise

            Rotary Youth and Community Centre (68 McNamara Dr) MAP
            Nov 2 ? Nov 28
            ?
            Mount Pearl

            Reid Community Centre (126 Smallwood Dr) MAP
            Nov 2 ? Nov 28
            ?
            Conception Bay South:

            All Saints Parish Hall, Foxtrap (419 Conception Bay Highway)
            Nov 2 ? Nov 28
            ?
            Torbay:

            Holy Trinity High (23 Lynch?s Lane)
            Nov 16 ? Nov 28
            ?
            Portugal Cove-St. Philips:

            PCSP Recreation Centre(1119 Thorburn Road) MAP
            Nov 2 ? Nov 10
            ?
            Bell Island

            St. Augustine?s Elementary
            Nov 11 ? Nov 14
            ?
            Bay Bulls/Witless Bay:

            Mobile Central High, Mobile
            Nov 11 ? Nov 19
            ?
            Ferryland:

            Baltimore School Complex
            Nov 5 ? Nov 10
            ?
            Trepassey:

            Stella Maris Academy
            Nov 2 ? Nov 4

            ?
            For other areas, see Eastern Health?s press release about the clinics.

            And remember: this is fun!

            http://thescope.ca/2009/10/29/where-...-st-johns-area
            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
            -Nelson Mandela

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

              Flu shot plans spark protest on N.L. south coast

              Last Updated: Thursday, October 29, 2009 | 12:27 PM NT

              CBC News

              Parents from several communities on Newfoundland's south coast were planning to keep their children out of school Thursday to protest swine flu immunization plans for the area.

              The parents are upset with health officials, who they say are taking too long to vaccinate children in the area.

              Eastern Health, the province's largest health authority, released details Wednesday about how immunization of the public will roll out at clinics across the region starting Monday.

              Twenty-seven vaccination clinics are being set up in an area stretching from St. John's to Grand Bank, on the south coast, and Bonavista on the northeast coast.

              The authority wants people who are at high-risk of getting H1N1 to show up first to be vaccinated.

              Alice Parrott of St. Bernard's, on the Burin Peninsula, said people in her area aren't scheduled to get the vaccine until mid-November.

              But she said there are hundreds of children in three area schools, including her eight-year-old granddaughter, who should get it sooner.

              "A little over 400 kids," Parrott said. "Like, how long will it take to do them? To me, it doesn't make sense. You'd think it would make more sense to go to the schools and immunize the children."

              Parrott said parents from several communities are angry enough to keep their children out of school for a day. Parents will protest outside one of the schools, Fortune Bay Academy, on Thursday, she said.


              Maximizing number of shots nurses give

              Eastern Health said it's not yet practical to go into the schools because it's trying to maximize the number of shots that nurses can give at mass clinics

              However, Education Minister Darin King said officials are looking at ways to mirror the regular vaccination programs already in place in the school system.

              "School boards, I think, are fully supportive of that," he said, "and I think the Health Department understands that. So those plans are currently being worked through, but there's also some practical reasons why that's not always possible to be done."

              King said where it can be done, nurses will try to follow the regular routine of going into the schools and vaccinating children there.

              The number of people showing up at hospitals across the province with flu-like symptoms has grown rapidly in recent days.

              Many schools across the eastern region of the province have seen large absenteeism rates because of sickness. Health officials suspect many of the young people are suffering from H1N1.

              http://www.cbc.ca/canada/newfoundlan...st-291009.html
              "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
              -Nelson Mandela

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                N.L. health workers helped families jump flu queue

                Last Updated: Thursday, October 29, 2009 | 3:04 PM NT

                CBC News

                Newfoundland and Labrador?s largest regional health board says some health-care workers helped their family members jump the queue to get the swine flu vaccine.

                The Eastern Regional Health Authority, which includes St. John?s, made swine flu shots available to health-care workers Monday but some of the people who were vaccinated were supposed to wait until next week.

                "It certainly wasn't intentional, and while it wasn't the intent, I understand that some people did bring family members in," Eastern Health's chief medical officer of health, Dr. David Allison, said Wednesday.

                Allison said he is reminding health-care workers that their families members should wait until next week for a shot, like everyone else in the province.

                He said it's important to vaccinate health workers first so they'll be healthy enough to treat the general public later.

                Some people believe Eastern Health, which offered the vaccine to more than 12,000 health workers this week, didn't cast its net widely enough. Roslyn Bennett says people who work in daycare centres should have had priority too.

                After two children were confirmed with H1N1 at the St. John's daycare where she works, Bennett called Eastern Health.

                "The staff feel that they are at risk. How do we get the staff vaccinated?

                How do we protect the children and the families? And I was told that the staff have to wait until next week, when the mass immunization begins," she told CBC News.

                Late Wednesday afternoon, the health authority released details about how immunization of the public will roll out at clinics across its region starting Monday, Nov. 2.

                Eastern Heath says it will set up 27 vaccination clinics in its area.

                http://www.cbc.ca/canada/newfoundlan...ueue-2810.html
                "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                -Nelson Mandela

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                  <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=4 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=NewsHeader>OCT
                  30 2009
                  H1N1 Vaccinations Underway for High Risk Groups

                  <TABLE id=Table_01 height=22 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top width=126 height=22></TD><TD vAlign=top width=109 height=22></TD><TD vAlign=top align=right></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

                  </TD></TR><TR><TD class=NewsDescription vAlign=top colSpan=2> High risk members of the population will begin receiving their H1N1 vaccinations today. Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Faith Stratton says clinics will remain open throughout this weekend until all of the high risk population is vaccinated. High risk individuals include those with chronic illness, respiratory illness such as asthma, chronic lung disease, diabetes, children between 6 months and 5 years of age and pregnant women.

                  Health Minister Jerome Kennedy says school children are the next priority. Kennedy says the province has 86,000 doses of the vaccine to date. He says that will unlikely get us through to the next shipment which is expected to arrive Wednesday. Dr. Stratton says healthy adults are asked to wait until after the school children, pointing out they don't have enough vaccine to do everybody.

                  The province's Health Minister, Jerome Kennedy, says they are prepared to pursue any method to deal with the H1N1 pandemic. On VOCM Open Line with Randy Simms, Kennedy responded to a suggestion to use Mile One in St. John's to handle the large crowds and keep people comfortable in the cold weather. Kennedy says they are open to any discussions to allow the proper handling of the situation. He says however the reality is they are limited by the number of vaccines.

                  Meantime Education Minister Darin King says school trips to other communities, including sports events, will be postponed for the next 14 days to prevent the spread of the virus. King says once the high risk immunizations are complete, they'll move into the schools to vaccinate students. He says they'll try to follow the same process for regular school vaccinations. He says they could change in some cases. For example, if there are two schools in one community, children may be bussed to another school. More details will be released in the coming days.

                  The first of Eastern Health's immunization clinics for high risk individuals open at noon. For this weekend only clinics will be available in St John's at the Cortage Place Community Health Centre and MacDonald Drive Junior High; for CBS and Paradise at the Rotary Youth and Community Centre; at the Reid Centre in Mount Pearl; in Whitbourne at the Newhook Building; the Placentia Health Care Centre Community Health Office; the Taylor Building in Harbour Grace; the Dawe Building in Bay Robert's; in Burin at the Dodge Building; in Bonvista at Discovery Collegiate and at Laskey Place in Clarenville. All clinics will be open from 12 noon until 8pm today and from 10am-8pm Saturday and Sunday. Anyone with any questions or concerns is asked to call Eastern Health's toll free H1N1 Information line at 1-877 752-4358 or visit their website. Elsewhere in the province, all clinics will remain the same, save for Corner Brook where the flu assessment clinic at Western Memorial Regional Hospital has been moved to the former Regina High School on Mount Bernard Avenue.

                  Eastern Health has set up a clinic for people who think they might have the Swine Flu, and is now open seeing patients. To ease the burden on doctors' offices and emergency rooms, Eastern Health has set up an Influenza Assessment Clinic at the new medical building on Major's Path. The clinic is set up for people who are experiencing flu-like symptoms, but is not a substitute for emergency situations. If you are experiencing difficulty breathing or serious shortness of breath, you should go to an emergency department. If you have flu-like symptoms, but are otherwise healthy and strong, health officials are asking you to stay home to avoid infecting others. Flu symptoms include cough, fever, fatigue, muscle aches, sore throat, headache, runny nose and decreased appetite. Other symptoms may include nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

                  Western Health also has set up a flu assessment area and today Central Health announced that patients coming to the James Payton Hospital in Gander, showing flu-like symptoms, will be examined in a separate area.

                  For the second time this week Central Health has revised the schedule for the distribution of the H1N1 vaccine throughout the region. It was due to begin Monday for individuals considered to be at high-risk and continue for a two week period. The mass immunization clinics by Central Health will now be open today and tomorrow at the Pentecostal Churches in Gander and Lewisporte, as well as the Beaumont Hamel Armory in Grand Falls-Windsor,and St. Anne's All-Grade School in Conne River. Vaccinations are also taking place tomorrow and Sunday at Indian River High School in Springdale, and Memorial Academy in Wesleyville. Other scheduled clinics are tomorrow at the LOL Lodge in Harbour Breton and Sunday at the Royal Canadian Legion in St.Alban's, as well as November 2nd at the Parish Hall in Rencontre, November 3rd at the Lion's Club in Gaultois and Lakeside Academy in Buchans,and November 4th at the Community Centre in McCallum. Clinics that were scheduled from November 9th to the 13th have been moved ahead, with specific dates expected to be released tomorrow. Individuals attending these clinics must bring along their MCP card to register,and children must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian who can sign a consent form.

                  Labrador-Grenfell is inoculating people against the H1N1 virus. It's the second day for the clinic in Sheshatshui and the first and only day in Churchill Falls. For specific details on locations in Churchill Falls, check the bulletin board at the town centre or go to the Labrador-Grenfell Health Authority website. To get a start on the vaccination of high risk groups clinics are being put in place tomorrow from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. They will be located in:

                  Labrador City in the conference room near Public Health on the Main Floor at the Captain William Jackman Memorial Hospital.
                  At Happy Valley-Goose Bay: Main Conference Room at the Labrador Health Centre.
                  St. Anthony: Recreation Room, Old Hospital. NOTE: Due to visitor limitations at the Charles S. Curtis Memorial Hospital, please use the entrance next to the Laundry Department at the far end of the hospital.


                  Clinics will also be taking place in November in Rigolet, Nain, Hopedale, Postville, Makkovik, Cartwright, Black Tickle, Charlottetown, Mary's Harbour, Port Hope Simpson, St.Lewis, Forteau, Roddickton, Flower's Cove and St.Anthony. A week has been set aside for the towns of Happy Valley-Goose Bay and Labrador City-Wabush Nov. 7-13. Meantime, there are changes at some services and facilities in the region. The authority has also announced that limited visitation is in place at Curtis Hospital in St. Anthony and the John M. Gray Centre in St. Anthony. And the public should note that a number of programs and services at the Labrador Health Centre in Happy Valley-Goose Bay have been suspended until the completion of the mass immunization clinics. Those programs include prenatal education, healthy baby clubs, breastfeeding support groups, healthcheck pre-school clinics, school health programs, various immunizations, and lifestyle and blood pressure clinics.


                  The mayor of Terrenceville says Swine Flu is hitting her community hard, and she's baffled by the mass immunization plan for the region. The nearest clinic takes place from Nov. 14-18 at the school in Rushoon, but Sheila Cox says that's a 45-minute drive away. She says the bulk of the population lives in the Terrenceville area. Cox told VOCM BackTalk with Bill Rowe it would make more sense to have the clinic for the northern part of the Burin Peninsula closer to where the majority lives.



                  Vaccination will continue today for prisoners and staff at Her Majesty's Penitentiary . Medical officials began immunizing the population there yesterday, but some people have problems with that approach. A woman from Port aux Basques on VOCM BackTalk with Bill Rowe, questioned how anyone could draw up a schedule that calls for prisoners to be put ahead of school children.

                  Officials at Memorial University are in talks with Eastern Health regarding use of the campus as a site to vaccinate students, faculty and staff. Both parties are expected to make an announcement in the coming days.

                  The College of the North Atlantic is postponing College Day events due to the H1N1 pandemic. They were slated for November 5th and will be rescheduled. The annual celebration showcases the programs and services offered at College's campuses throughout the province. Officials at the facility feel it is best to postpone the event, which would see over 3-thousand students and members of the public visit their campuses.

                  http://vocm2009.ncc.ca/newsarticle.asp?id=2381


                  </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
                  "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                  -Nelson Mandela

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD width="100%"></TD><TD></TD><TD></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD background=images/dash.gif height=1></TD></TR><TR><TD align=right></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD height=10>Last updated at 12:17 AM on 31/10/09 </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
                    Western Health rolls out revised plan for H1N1 vaccinations
                    CORNER BROOK
                    CORY HURLEY
                    The Western Star

                    Western Health continues to adjust its internal and external practices and services in an attempt to deal with the increasing pandemic surrounding the H1N1 virus.

                    Friday, Western Health revised its schedule for mass immunization clinics and put plans in place to begin cutting back and prioritizing certain services such as elective surgeries.

                    A part of that is due to the fact the hospitals and clinics, like the general public, are dealing with personal sickness and, additionally, there is an increase in staffing demands in other key areas.

                    ?These are the types of things we have to do with business continuity,? Dr. Greg Mercer, medical officer of health for Western Health, said. ?We have to make sure the staff, like doctors and nurses and other people within our organization, are able to care for the people who are sickest.
                    ?We had to plan for some of our staff being sick, and indeed they are. We are being impacted and that is precisely why we are prioritizing things like our surgeries.?

                    The priority for staffing right now lies with services such as the emergency room, flu assessment clinics, doctors offices, and intensive care units ? areas Mercer referred to as the battle grounds against H1N1.

                    The revised schedule for mass immunization clinics starts with those people who are at the highest risk of experiencing complications if they contract the influenza. These groups include:
                    ? individuals under 65 with chronic health conditions
                    ? those living in remote and isolated settings or communities
                    ? children six months to five years of age, including kindergarten students
                    ? health care workers involved in pandemic response or the delivery of essential care services
                    ? pregnant women
                    ? household contacts and caregivers of persons at high risk who cannot be immunized or may not respond to vaccines, and populations otherwise identified as high risk.

                    Individuals who fall into one of the categories are encouraged to get their vaccine early at a clinic scheduled in their area.

                    As of Thursday, approximately 75 per cent of health-care workers in the western region have received the H1N1 vaccine.

                    Western Health is currently providing the H1N1 vaccination to all children in the region from age six months to five years, including kindergarten students and to parents of newborns up to six months, by appointment. These appointments have been scheduled and are currently taking place at public health offices throughout the region. Also, continuing care nurses are currently providing the H1N1 vaccine, by appointment, to all non-ambulatory clients who are under the age of 65 and are currently receiving nursing services. These residents are also being contacted.

                    In addition, mass immunization clinics for all residents have been scheduled for Nov. 2-3 for the communities of Ramea, Francois, Grey River and Grand Bruit.

                    Those who do not fall under one of the high-risk categories listed above are requested to wait until later in the vaccination schedule to receive their vaccine.

                    Earlier this week, Eastern Health answered to reports that health-care workers were taking family members not scheduled to receive the vaccine to get it. Mercer said he didn?t have first-hand knowledge of that happening locally, but expects it is to a limited degree.

                    ?We have tried to put processes in place to limit that as much as possible, but I think we also have to accept the fact people giving vaccines are also humans and have families and that sort of stuff,? he said.
                    ?I am not condoning or sanctioning those types of actions, but, from what I can understand in terms of where our vaccine has been given, it looks like things are pretty tight overall.
                    ?We have done well. In excess of 2,600 vaccines already this week, probably hundreds more (Friday), but I feel, for the most part, that is being given to those who need it the most.?

                    With the mass immunization clinics rolling out next week, to be followed by clinics for the rest of the general public, Mercer anticipates a lot of people heading to those particular sites to receive the vaccine.

                    ?We have seen these long lines of people waiting for six or seven hours, that may be an unfortunate reality we will have to face,? he said. ?Because people are so anxious to get this vaccine, we are not going to take five or six weeks to get it into the arms of high risk people. Hopefully, that will be done by end of day Wednesday and Thursday of next week.?

                    The provincial government, working with the regional health authorities, will monitor the mass immunization program as it rolls out and changes may be made to the existing plan.

                    Residents unable to leave their home due to medical reasons, but are not receiving continuing care nursing services, or for further information call 1-877-632-H1N1(4161).

                    http://www.thewesternstar.com/index....d=299068&sc=23

                    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
                    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                    -Nelson Mandela

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                      N.L. changes flu shot rules after queue jumping

                      N.L. changes flu shot rules after queue jumping
                      'Let our children come first,' health minister pleads
                      Last Updated: Saturday, October 31, 2009 | 11:09 PM NT Comments131Recommend40.
                      CBC News
                      Hundreds of people were again lining up at swine flu vaccination clinics in Newfoundland and Labrador on Saturday, amid word health officials have tightened the rules on who can get the shot, and predictions the supply will run out before day's end.

                      The province ditched its original plan to begin vaccinations for the general public starting Monday, Nov. 2, and made the shots available Friday for people who are at a high risk of complications from influenza.

                      However, Health Minister Jerome Kennedy said Friday evening that he has been forced to step in and change the rules involving high-risk candidates, after hearing many healthy adults were slipping to the front of the line to get the shot.

                      Earlier in the week, Eastern Health, the province's largest health authority, admitted that some of its workers who were getting the vaccination as a priority were also bringing family members in to be vaccinated.

                      "I appealed to people on the honour system," Kennedy told CBC News. "All of the stories today [Friday] that came back to me, unfortunately, indicated that that may not have been the case. We had young children out in the cold for hours."

                      Kennedy said it was disappointing that otherwise healthy adults would make children wait for the vaccine. He appealed to people to be less selfish.

                      "Let our children come first. Let's deal with our children and our adults with high-risk conditions. I know people are concerned. We're trying to do the best we can, but we have a very limited supply of this vaccine and we have to try to get it out to the children of our province."

                      Kennedy said starting Saturday, health officials who are giving the shots will limit the H1N1 vaccine to:

                      ?Children between the ages of six months and five years old.
                      ?People between the ages of five and 24 who have chronic conditions.
                      ?Pregnant women who are in the second half of their pregnancy.
                      "Instructions will be given to all of the regional health authorities that parents who come there tomorrow [Saturday] with their children will not be provided with the vaccine, and that healthy people will be asked to wait [until] later on."

                      Emergency rooms in the province and doctors' clinics have been overrun with people showing up with flu-like symptoms. Health officials suspect many of those people had H1N1.

                      Kennedy said there has been such a demand for the swine flu shot that health officials expect to run out of the vaccine sometime Saturday. A new batch of medicine won't arrive in the province until Wednesday.

                      Kennedy said the federal government has said that it will be a smaller shipment than originally anticipated.

                      Health officials said that once the current supply is depleted this weekend, 82,000 doses of the vaccine will have been given to people, vaccinating about 17 per cent of the province's half million residents.

                      http://www.cbc.ca/canada/newfoundlan...es-311009.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                        <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD height=10>Last updated at 8:42 AM on 31/10/09 </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
                        <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>New rules for vaccines
                        Health Tight supply, queue jumping leads to limits on high-risk categories

                        BARB SWEET
                        The Telegram


                        </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
                        <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top align=middle></TD></TR><TR><TD class=photoCaption vAlign=top width="100%" height="100%"><TABLE height="100%" cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=5 width="100%" border=0><TBODY></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


                        Health Minister Jerome Kennedy has ordered stringent restrictions at H1N1 vaccination clinics.

                        Only the following people will be vaccinated at this time: children aged six months to five years; people aged five years up to and including age 24 with chronic conditions and pregnant women in the second half of pregnancy.

                        No one else will get the vaccine ,and health authorities have been instructed to put extra security on to try to make sure only those in the three approved groups get the vaccine.

                        The high risk group was broader up until the new rules, but Kennedy said the supply is tightening. Healthy people jumped the queue Friday.

                        "We can't rely on the honour system. I'm very disappointed by that," Kennedy said Friday night.

                        This week's allotment of the vaccine is expected to run out sometime today in the St. John's area. More will be on the way Wednesday, but health officials are expecting to get less of it, although they don't know exactly how limited it will be.

                        The regular H1N1 vaccine production is being slowed to produce the version of the vaccine considered more preferable for pregnant women. (It's up to pregnant women which one they take.)

                        "Today I asked people to do the right thing," Kennedy said, adding he is disappointed many healthy people didn't wait until the high risk groups went first.

                        Originally all adults who had chronic illness were considered in the high risk group, but Kennedy said because of the limited supply of vaccine, they'll have to wait and new measures must be taken to ensure they reach the most vulnerable people.

                        While it's been indicating details are being worked out to make the vaccine available in schools, Kennedy said that all depends now on the province's supply.

                        Hundreds of people jammed lineups in the metro area on the first day of public mass immunization Friday.

                        "I would be very surprised if by (Saturday) all the vaccine available in St. John's area is not gone," Kennedy told reporters Friday afternoon outside the House of Assembly. He was referring to the clinics that would be held today. At clinics Friday many parents who waited hours in line with children also took their shot.

                        "People have to be apply common sense here. If you have a parent who is going up with a child, for example, who is getting the vaccination, the parent has to say no because there is another child looking for that," Kennedy told media Friday afternoon, hours before he brought in the new rules.

                        By the end of today some 20,000 people in the St. John's area were to have received the vaccine. The current supply for the whole province is 86,000 shots.

                        The public clinics weren't supposed to start until Monday - health care workers were being vaccinated this week - but they were moved up because of public demand. Kennedy said it was unfortunate people, especially children had to wait for hours in the cold Friday and he acknowledged people were frustrated.

                        Several clinics got underway Friday. The line ups were so long, Eastern Health cut them off shortly after 4:30 p.m. Friday, allowing only those already in line to continue. Closing time was supposed to be 8 p.m. but officials said those already in line at 4:30 p.m. would push them into extra hours. At Cordage Place Friday night at 8 p.m. there were still hundreds outside waiting in the cold to get their vaccine.

                        Some people lined up Friday in wheelchairs, or with oxygen tanks attached. Parents pushed strollers, and lugged books and toys to amuse toddlers while waiting. Many people were thankful for the sunshine after weeks of dreary, rainy weather as lines snaked outside. Some wore costumes on the eve of Halloween. A few people were seen with surgical-type masks.

                        At Cordage Place in St. John's off Empire Avenue, health officials started giving the vaccine two hours ahead of schedule Friday morning, easing the line up.

                        Sandra Burry of Portugal Cove went to Cordage Place early because she didn't know where it was. She was surprised at the early start.

                        "I'm a transplant patient," she explained of her desire to get the vaccine.

                        Jennifer Johnson brought her son Sydney because there had been an illness in his daycare.

                        "We don't know if it's the flu or not but nobody's ready to take any chances," she said as Sydney played with a small toy train to take his mind off getting the needle.

                        Joanne Thorne brought her three kids, including a girl under five and a seven year old with asthma.

                        She said it would have been better to have vaccinations at school, but "anyway is a good way now."

                        At Macdonald Drive Junior High, Erin Rose was wearing a face mask while waiting to get her daughter Haley Brinson vaccinated.

                        Rose said she'd been told she has the flu.

                        "It's all on my chest - I have puffers and that."

                        "Hopefully, I'll get ahead of the game," said Gerard Spencer, who already felt cold symptoms.

                        Also Friday, some sheriff's officers were approached to take on extra work by the security company hired to staff the clinics.

                        Dr. Faith Stratton, the province's chief medical officer of health said in the 24 hours between Thursday and Friday 27 people had been hospitalized with respiratory illness around the province, although it's not known how many are related to H1N1.

                        Several of those were in intensive care.

                        And Eastern Health has implemented visitor restrictions at hospitals throughout the region.

                        The health authority is asking members of the public not to visit patients in facilities, except under exceptional circumstances.

                        The restrictions do not apply to Eastern Health's long-term care facilities at this time, but that situation will be monitored.

                        Several organizations were also restricting activities or issue advisories.

                        The Red Cross advised people to sanitize hands, door knobs and door bells and wash hands while passing out Halloween treats today. It said children shouldn't touch their eyes, nose and mouth.

                        And due to growing public concerns surrounding the H1N1 pandemic, College of the North Atlantic has decided to postpone its annual College Day events scheduled for Nov. 5.

                        Dr. David Allison, Eastern Health's medical officer, said it's up to groups and sporting organizations whether to go ahead with events. But he urged people who aren't well to not feel obligated to attend functions or games.

                        http://www.thetelegram.com/index.cfm?sid=299212&sc=79
                        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                        -Nelson Mandela

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                          <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD height=10>Last updated at 11:08 AM on 02/11/09 </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
                          New priorites and schedule for Swine Flu immunization
                          The Packet

                          Based on the new criteria for immunization, Eastern Health has revised its immunization clinic schedule.

                          The schedule previously posted on the Eastern Health website and advertised in local papers is no longer applicable.

                          Until noted otherwise, we will be posting schedules on a day-by-day basis.

                          Please note that these clinics address individuals who fall in the following high risk categories:

                          -Children six months up to fifty-nine months of age (under 5)

                          -People five years of age up to and including 24 years of age with chronic conditions

                          -Pregnant women in the second half of their pregnancy (20 to 40 weeks)

                          -Parents or other primary care providers (up to two per child) of children under the age of six months; and of immuno-compromised children and young adults (up to and including 24 years of age) who cannot themselves be vaccinated.

                          Those who do not fall under one of the high risk categories listed above are requested to wait until later in the vaccination schedule to receive their vaccine.

                          Clarenville, Laskey Place, November 2
                          10:00 am ? 6:00 pm

                          Bonavista community Health Nursing Office ? Chapel Hill, November 2 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

                          Arnold?s Cove, Tricentia Academy, November 3
                          10:00 am ? 8:00 pm ONE DAY ONLY

                          Lethbridge Community Health Nursing Office, November 3
                          10:00 am ? 8:00 pm ONE DAY ONLY

                          For updates, visit www.easternhealth.ca, or call the Healthline at 1-888-709-2929.

                          The public is reminded to bring an MCP card to the clinic and to wear clothing that allows easy access to the upper arm.

                          Children under 10 years of age will require a second dose of H1N1 Vaccine. Information regarding followup dose will be made available at the time of immunization.

                          http://www.thepacket.ca/index.cfm?sid=299581&sc=368
                          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                          -Nelson Mandela

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                            <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD width="100%">LOCAL NEWS</TD><TD>Post a comment |</TD><TD></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD background=images/dash.gif height=1></TD></TR><TR><TD align=right></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD height=10>Last updated at 10:44 AM on 02/11/09 </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
                            Revised H1N1 immunization clinic schedule for Eastern Health
                            The Telegram

                            Eastern Health would like to advise the public of an adjustment to the schedule posted Sunday in relation to three of the sites in the St. John?s region.
                            St. John?s (West) at Hazelwood Elmentary; Paradise at Rotary Youth and Community Centre; and the Bay Bulls/Witless Bay/ Ferryland area clinic at Mobile Central High will be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m and not until 6 p.m. as previously announced.

                            Clinics:
                            Bell Island
                            Community Health Office 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. on Nov. 3;

                            Torbay (also serving Portugal Cove/St. Philip?s)
                            Holy Trinity High 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. on Nov. 2;

                            St. John?s (East)
                            MacDonald Drive Junior High School 10 a.m. ? 8 p.m. Nov. 2;

                            St. John?s (West)
                            Hazelwood Academy 10 a.m. ? 8 p.m. Nov. 2;

                            Mount Pearl
                            Reid Community Centre 10 a.m. ? 8 p.m. Nov. 2;

                            Paradise (also serving Conception Bay South)
                            Rotary Youth and Community Centre 10 a.m. ? 8 p.m. Nov. 2;

                            Trepassey
                            Community Health Office 10 a.m. ? 6 p.m. Nov. 3 (one day only);

                            Bay Bulls/Witless Bay/ Ferryland area Mobile Central High, Mobile
                            10 a.m. ? 8 p.m. Nov. 2.


                            http://www.thetelegram.com/index.cfm?sid=299599&sc=79

                            </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
                            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                            -Nelson Mandela

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Newfoundland and Labrador- Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                              N.L. doctors want to administer H1N1 vaccinations

                              Last Updated: Monday, November 2, 2009 | 2:18 PM NT

                              CBC News

                              A physician in Port aux Basques, western Newfoundland, says her patients should be able to receive H1N1 influenza vaccinations at her office instead of only at specialized clinics.

                              "We find it very frustrating as physicians," said Dr. Wendy Graham. "We'd like to be a part of the program. We don?t want to see any current vaccine that exists in our province sit in the refrigerators for months.

                              We've been asking to be a part of this program. We'd like to get vaccine into our patients as soon as possible."

                              She said many doctors have cold storage, and they already administer several types of vaccine.

                              Graham says the association that represents Newfoundland and Labrador physicians is lobbying the provincial government to get doctors involved in the vaccination program, which is targeting the strain of H1N1 influenza A causing the current swine flu pandemic.

                              Nurses employed by regional health authorities in Newfoundland and Labrador have been giving residents shots at designated centres throughout the province.

                              The province is trying to make sure that the vaccine is first administered to health workers, people at high risk for developing complications from influenza and those who care for people who can't get vaccinated.

                              http://www.cbc.ca/canada/newfoundlan...hots-1102.html
                              "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                              -Nelson Mandela

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X