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  • Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

    Roll up your sleeves

    H1N1 flu vaccinations for Manitobans start Monday
    By PAUL TURENNE, SUN MEDIA
    Last Updated: 22nd October 2009, 7:46am

    Manitobans can begin receiving vaccinations against the H1N1 flu virus on Monday.

    The federal government officially approved the vaccine for use in Canada yesterday, and shortly thereafter the province announced its plans to roll out enough doses of it to stick a needle in the arm of each and every Manitoban who is so inclined.

    "The clinics will offer the vaccine free of charge to all Manitobans who need or want it," Health Minister Theresa Oswald said yesterday.

    Pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline has a contract to produce about 50 million doses of the pandemic vaccine at its facility in Ste-Foy, Que., to be distributed across Canada in batches. Manitoba Health has identified a three-tiered priority list for administering that vaccine.

    Those who should get the vaccine first, because they're most at risk, include children between six months and five years old, aboriginals, anyone living in a remote area, and people with chronic medical conditions, among other groups.

    The province has also listed pregnant women among that first group, but that comes with an asterisk.

    The H1N1 vaccine contains adjuvants -- compounds that boost the immune system's response to vaccine. Though there is no evidence that its unsafe for pregnant women, Dr. Joel Kettner, Manitoba's chief public health officer, does suggest they wait for an unadjuvanted batch if possible, out of an abundance of caution.

    The problem is, those batches won't be here for a few weeks yet, so Kettner suggests pregnant women speak with doctors or nurses to determine when to get the vaccine and which one to get.

    The second priority group, whose turn is likely a few weeks down the road, includes people who work with pigs or poultry and people who are critical to delivering "the essentials of life," which could include everyone from water plant workers to snowplow drivers.

    The third and final group is basically everyone else.

    "We ask Manitobans to respect this priority as they make plans to get the vaccine," Oswald said. "We want to ensure the individuals who will benefit most from the vaccine receive it first.

    "You will get the vaccine if you need or want it, just perhaps not in the first week."

    It's unknown how long it will take to move through the different priority groups, but Oswald said the government will make that clear when the time comes.

    "We intend to be advertising the heck out of this thing," she said.

    The regional health authorities are responsible for the dates and locations of immunization clinics. The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority has yet to announce its H1N1 vaccine clinic plans.

    ---
    TOP PRIORITY

    Priority groups for the H1N1 vaccine:

    - Children six months to five years old
    - Aboriginals
    - Pregnant women
    - Health care workers and first responders
    - Those living in remote areas
    - Those with weakened immune systems and their caregivers
    - People younger than 65 with chronic medical conditions
    - 'Disadvantaged' people such as the homeless
    - Single parents, sole caregivers of dependants
    - Those who live with or care for infants

    Source: Manitoba Health


    http://www.winnipegsun.com/news/cana...-11483801.html
    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

  • #2
    Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="98%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=itemHead>Manitoba Flu Bulletin #2</TD></TR><TR><TD class=itemInfo>Posted by admin on 2009/10/22 11:20:00 (8 reads) </TD></TR><TR><TD>October 21, 2009

    Manitoba Health and Healthy Living has released the list of Manitobans who would benefit the most from getting the H1N1 flu shot and has confirmed the province’s regional health authorities will begin delivering H1N1 immunizations the week of Oct. 26.


    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

    The H1N1 flu shot is expected to help protect Manitobans against the new pandemic strain of the flu now in circulation. Manitobans are strongly encouraged to get the H1N1 flu shot at no charge at flu clinics run by their regional health authorities.

    Plans for the flu clinics are now being finalized by regional health authorities (RHAs). RHAs will have the most current information about flu clinics and vaccine delivery in their areas.

    The vaccine is expected to arrive in batches and the early clinics will be for Manitobans who should get the shot first. Once these Manitobans are immunized over the course of a few weeks, the H1N1 flu shot will be made available to every Manitoban who needs or wants to be vaccinated and will benefit from vaccination.

    Manitobans who should get the H1N1 flu shot first include:
    • children aged six months to under five years old;
    • anyone of Aboriginal ancestry (First Nations, Métis or Inuit);
    • disadvantaged individuals (for example, the homeless);
    • people living in remote or isolated areas;
    • people under 65 with a chronic medical condition or other risks including severe obesity, substance abuse or alcoholism;
    • anyone with a weakened immune system or those who live with or care for them;
    • those who live with or care for infants under six months old;
    • single parents or anyone solely responsible for a dependent;
    • health-care workers and medical first responders; and
    • pregnant women

    In November, an unadjuvanted shot recommended for pregnant women will be available. Women who are pregnant can wait until that shot arrives or they can talk to their health-care provider about the pros and cons of getting the adjuvanted vaccine sooner.

    It is recommended that children between the ages of six months and nine years receive two half‑doses of the shot with 21 days between the first and second shot.

    Manitoba expects to have 134,000 vaccine doses the week of Oct. 26 and subsequent deliveries of vaccine will continue weekly.

    Manitoba’s priority groups are based on national recommendations and have been tailored to address the province’s conditions and experiences with H1N1 flu so far.

    As more vaccine arrives, the H1N1 shot will be offered at flu shot clinics to other Manitobans who need or want it and are expected to benefit from it. Later, it may also be available from family doctors and other health-care providers.

    The H1N1 flu shot will be available for all adults and children five years of age or older who need or want it and are expected to benefit from it, once additional batches of vaccine arrive. All employers are encouraged to identify people who provide services that are critical to meeting the necessities of life and support the daily operation of Manitoba communities, particularly where there are limited numbers of people who can perform those jobs if someone becomes ill. People who work directly with swine and poultry should also be vaccinated once additional batches arrive because this can help limit the spread of illness in these animals. Individuals in these groups are encouraged to get an H1N1 flu shot early.

    The H1N1 flu vaccine is not licensed for infants under six months of age. People who are allergic to eggs or other influenza vaccine components should not be vaccinated. The H1N1 vaccine is also not recommended for anyone who has had a lab-confirmed diagnosis of H1N1 flu.

    During the H1N1 flu clinics, Manitobans who are eligible for the seasonal flu shot may be offered both flu shots if they have not yet received their seasonal shot this year. Both flu shots have been designed to provide protection against the known flu viruses expected to be circulating in Manitoba this year. Manitobans aged 65 and older should also get a pneumococcal shot at the same time as the seasonal flu shot unless they have had a pneumococcal shot in the past. Most adults only need one pneumococcal shot in their lifetime.

    Health Canada has assessed available data on the safety, quality and effectiveness of the H1N1 vaccine and concluded the benefit-to-risk profile is favourable for active immunization against the H1N1 in an officially declared pandemic situation. As part of the authorization, the manufacturer will be required to continue submitting data on the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine. This approach is similar to that used in other countries.

    For more information about H1N1 or to find links to flu shot clinics operated by regional health authorities, visit <A href="http://www.manitoba.ca/" target=_blank>www.manitoba.ca


    http://www.nationtalk.ca/modules/news/article.php?storyid=24806
    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

      H1N1 vaccination clinics announced in Winnipeg

      Last Updated: Thursday, October 22, 2009 | 1:28 PM CT

      CBC News


      Health officials released a list of H1N1 clinics in Winnipeg on Thursday, ahead of next week's start of vaccinations.

      Starting Monday, 12 clinics will be set up throughout the city.

      Vaccinations are free of charge for everyone. People are reminded to bring their Manitoba health card.

      Each clinic will be open Monday to Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
      <IFRAME style="BORDER-RIGHT: black 1px solid; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; BORDER-TOP: black 1px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 0px; MARGIN-BOTTOM: 12px; PADDING-BOTTOM: 0px; BORDER-LEFT: black 1px solid; WIDTH: 590px; PADDING-TOP: 0px; BORDER-BOTTOM: black 1px solid; HEIGHT: 400px" marginWidth=0 marginHeight=0 src="http://data.mapchannels.com/embed/mbswineflu.htm" frameBorder=0 scrolling=no></IFRAME>Because of the anticipated high demand for the vaccine and the limited quantity that initially will be available, the Winnipeg Health Region is asking for the public's co-operation in order to ensure those at highest risk for serious illness get vaccinated first.

      "We're asking that only those individuals who are most at risk of serious illness from H1N1 attend one of the clinics during the first couple of weeks of the H1N1 immunization campaign," said Dr. Sande Harlos, WRHA medical officer of health.

      The vaccination campaign is expected to last about six weeks, and there will be enough vaccine for whoever wants it, so those at lower risk will have time to be immunized later, Harlos said.

      On Wednesday, the provincial government announced a list of "priority groups" for the vaccinations.

      These groups include children between six months and five years of age, as well as anyone with aboriginal ancestry, the homeless and people in remote, isolated areas of the province, according to health officials.

      Manitoba expects to have 134,000 vaccine doses the week of Oct. 26, and subsequent deliveries of serum will continue weekly.


      The priority groups who should get the H1N1 flu shot first include:
      • Children age six months to five years.
      • Anyone of aboriginal ancestry (First Nations, Métis or Inuit).
      • Disadvantaged individuals (for example, the homeless).
      • People living in remote or isolated areas.
      • People under 65 with a chronic medical condition or other risks, including severe obesity, substance abuse or alcoholism.
      • Anyone with a weakened immune system or those who live with or care for them.
      • Those who live with or care for infants younger than six months old.
      • Single parents or anyone solely responsible for a dependent.
      • Health-care workers and medical first responders.
      • Pregnant women.
      Pregnant women should try to wait

      Although pregnant women are listed as priority, a shot without adjuvants — chemicals that boost a vaccine's effectiveness — that is recommended for pregnant women won't be available until November.

      They are advised to wait until then, unless the cases of H1N1 in the province surge before then or a woman's family doctor suggests she get the vaccine, said a WRHA spokesperson.

      It is recommended that children between the ages of six months and nine years receive two half doses of the shot with 21 days between the first and second injections.

      Manitoba's priority groups are based on national recommendations and have been tailored to address the province's conditions and experiences so far with swine flu.

      As more vaccine arrives, the H1N1 shot may eventually be offered from family doctors and other health-care providers, and not just at flu clinics.

      Health care workers and medical first responder will be offered vaccine at their workplaces but can also attend the mass clinics in the community if it is more convenient for them.

      Outreach to disadvantaged people who might not attend a mass clinic is also occurring, the WRHA announced.

      Exceptions for the shot

      The H1N1 flu vaccine is not licensed for infants younger than six months, and people who are allergic to eggs or other influenza vaccine components should not be vaccinated, health officials advised.

      The H1N1 vaccine is also not recommended for anyone who has had a lab-confirmed diagnosis of H1N1 flu.

      During the H1N1 flu clinics, Manitobans who are eligible for the seasonal flu shot may be offered both flu shots if they have not yet received their seasonal shot this year.

      Manitobans age 65 and older should also get a pneumococcal shot at the same time as the seasonal flu shot unless they have had a pneumococcal shot in the past. Most adults only need one pneumococcal shot in their lifetime.

      2nd H1N1 wave in Manitoba

      The anticipated second wave of the H1N1 flu virus has already begun to strike Manitobans, provincial health officials say.

      Chief medical officer of health Dr. Joel Kettner confirmed earlier this week that there were three diagnosed cases of H1N1, also known as swine flu, in Manitoba in September.

      Because there are just a few cases so far, this is a good time to start immunizing people, said Harlos. It takes a week or two for the vaccine to produce immunity to the virus, he said.

      "I just want to emphasize that because it does take a couple of weeks for your body to build the immunity, this is really the perfect time to get ahead of the illness," Harlos said.

      Call for nurses

      The WRHA has put out a call for nurses willing to work at one of the mass immunization clinics.

      Gloria O'Rourke, WRHA vice president of human resources, said the call includes both those already working for the region and those who may not be.

      "These nurses may be working part-time for us and so are willing and able to pick up extra shifts. They may be working in important, but non-essential roles during a time like this —- staff education as an example — and so could be redeployed to assist with this major undertaking. Or they could be retired or working part-time somewhere else," she said.

      "We just want them all to know that we would appreciate and value their assistance."

      Any nurse or nurse practitioner interested in working at one at the clinics should contact the region at (204) 926-6089.

      More information on the vaccination clinics can be found on the WRHA website and the Manitoba government website.

      http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/st...-winnipeg.html
      "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
      -Nelson Mandela

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

        Thanks for the updates Pathfinder
        For us, the challenge is to achieve a proper balance between the dire warnings of Chicken Little and the folly of playing ostrich. --Steven M. Wolinsky, Science, Feb. 10, 2006.

        --Quiplash.

        I've decided that, starting June 15, 2009, I am going to place any flubie posts to three places:
        1. FluTrackers.com;
        2. curevents.com (my original home); and
        3. curevents.org (where the ever-on-top-of-it CanadaSue posts).

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

          Originally posted by Quiplash View Post
          Thanks for the updates Pathfinder

          You are welcome Quiplash.
          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
          -Nelson Mandela

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

            Lineups swell at H1N1 vaccination clinics

            Last Updated: Monday, October 26, 2009 | 3:02 PM CT

            CBC News


            H1N1 vaccination clinics opened in Winnipeg and much of the province on Monday. (Marcy Markusa/CBC)

            The first day of H1N1 vaccination clinics across Winnipeg and most of Manitoba drew lineups nearly three hours long at some locations.

            There have been reports of some people getting frustrated with the wait in Winnipeg and walking away.

            The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (WRHA) opened clinics at 12 locations throughout the city. By midmorning, the wait time at the downtown clinic in Portage Place Shopping Centre and at the one in River Heights at the Grant Park Shopping Centre was approaching three hours.

            The wait at other clinics in the city averaged about 90 minutes.

            As of noon today, a total of 1,891 people had received the vaccination, according to the WRHA.

            Even before the St. Boniface clinic opened at the Centre culturel franco-manitobain on Provencher Boulevard, there were about 30 people waiting in line.

            Around 1 p.m. the line was out the door at the clinic at Garden City Shopping Centre on McPhillips Street while the lines were also steady at the Point Douglas clinic at St. Joseph's Parish Hall on College Avenue.
            Karen Styrchak, 32, was one of those first up at the St. Boniface clinic. She rolled up her sleeve to get the shot with her 2½-year-old daughter Isabelle.

            "I'm pretty healthy. I rarely get sick, " Styrchak said. "But with young children around — and as my parents age and there's more people I know who are at risk around me — it's really to safeguard them as well."

            Because of the anticipated high demand for the vaccine and the limited quantity initially available, the provincial government announced a list of priority groups — those at highest risk for serious illness — to get vaccinated first.


            The priority groups who should get the H1N1 flu shot first include:
            • Children aged six months to five years.
            • Anyone of aboriginal ancestry (First Nations, Métis or Inuit).
            • Disadvantaged individuals (for example, the homeless).
            • People living in remote or isolated areas.
            • People under 65 with a chronic medical condition or other risks, including severe obesity, substance abuse or alcoholism.
            • Anyone with a weakened immune system or those who live with or care for them.
            • Those who live with or care for infants younger than six months old.
            • Single parents or anyone solely responsible for a dependent.
            • Health-care workers and medical first responders.
            • Pregnant women.
            Although pregnant women are listed as priority, a shot without adjuvants — chemicals that boost a vaccine's effectiveness — that is recommended for pregnant women won't be available until November.

            They are advised to wait until then, unless the cases of H1N1 in the province surge before then or a woman's family doctor suggests she get the vaccine, said a WRHA spokesperson.

            Some officials who got the shot Monday include Joel Kettner, Manitoba's chief medical officer of health, and WRHA president and CEO Dr. Brian Postl.

            The Opaskwayak Cree Nation near The Pas started vaccinating health staff on Monday, while children and youth will get the shots on Tuesday and then adults through the rest of the week.

            Norway House Cree Nation will start its flu shot campaign next week, when more nurses and clerical staff can be provided by the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch.

            Head nurse Flora Simpson told CBC News that staff will spend this week on making the community aware of the vaccine's safety and encouraging people to get the shot.

            First Nations people in remote northern Manitoba communities were hit particularly hard by the spring outbreak of the strain of swine flu virus with hundreds of patients sick and dozens flown to Winnipeg for treatment.

            That outbreak prompted the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs to declare a state of emergency.

            Garden Hill leaders get shots

            A vaccination clinic also opened Monday in Garden Hill First Nation, where about 10 nurses were flown from Winnipeg to help operate it.

            About 4,000 people live in the community, which reported several confirmed cases of swine flu in the spring, but there is only enough vaccine on hand for 2,700. However, provincial health officials say more vaccine will be arriving in the next few days.

            David Harper, grand chief of the Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak, an organization representing most First Nations communities in northern Manitoba, was quick to get in line, as was Garden Hill Chief Dino Flett.

            CBC News reporter Waubgeshig Rice, who was in Garden Hill on Monday, said the First Nations leaders wanted to set an example to others because there is apprehension among some about the vaccine's safety.

            "They want to encourage other people in the community here to come and get it," said Rice. "They just want to prove that it's safe and it's in the community's best interest. The leadership came down today just to quell some of those concerns."

            Vaccinations are free of charge for everyone in Manitoba. People are reminded to bring their Manitoba health card when they go.

            The clinics in Winnipeg will be open Monday to Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. They will be closed on Remembrance Day, Nov. 11, and are scheduled to run until Dec. 4.

            http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/st...a.html?ref=rss
            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
            -Nelson Mandela

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

              Man. H1N1 vaccine supply in danger

              'We aren't going to have the vaccine supply that we anticipated,' WRHA says

              Last Updated: Thursday, October 29, 2009 | 11:34 AM CT

              CBC News

              Manitoba is in danger of running out of H1N1 vaccine because too many people not on a priority list to receive the shot are turning up at mass-immunization clinics in Winnipeg, the head of the Winnipeg Regional Heath Authority says.

              "We're really urging the public to honour the categories of access that have been identified by Manitoba Health and the Public Health Agency" of Canada, Brian Postl, the health authority's CEO, said Thursday.

              “It's become evident that we aren't going to have the vaccine supply that we anticipated having when we began the vaccination program,” Postl said.


              Postl said the only people who should be lining up to get an H1N1 vaccination are those in the following categories:
              • Children aged six months to five years.
              • Anyone of aboriginal ancestry (First Nations, Métis or Inuit).
              • Disadvantaged individuals (for example, the homeless).
              • People living in remote or isolated areas.
              • People under 65 with a chronic medical condition or other risks, such as severe obesity, drug abuse or alcoholism.
              • Anyone with a weakened immune system or those who live with or care for such people.
              • Those who live with or care for infants younger than six months old.
              • Single parents or anyone solely responsible for a dependant.
              • Health-care workers and medical first responders.
              • Pregnant women.
              Although pregnant women are listed as a priority group, a shot without adjuvants — chemicals that boost a vaccine's effectiveness — is recommended for them and won't be available until November.

              Postl said other provinces are also having problems with high demand. Like Manitoba, they are waiting for more shipments of the vaccine from federal health officials.

              Postl said people need to respect the high-risk priority groups until more shipments of the H1N1 vaccine arrive in Manitoba.
              ‘Unprecedented’ demand

              Close to 40,000 people in Manitoba have received the swine flu vaccine since clinics opened around the province on Monday.

              Dr. Joel Kettner, Manitoba's chief medical officer of health, said
              Wednesday an “unprecedented” amount of people have been lining up for the shots.

              Wait times have been long in many clinics around Winnipeg: Some reported this week that people were waiting as much as three hours in line to get the injection.

              The clinics in Winnipeg will be open Monday to Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. CT and Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. They will be closed on Remembrance Day, Nov. 11, and are scheduled to run until Dec. 4.

              Locations for other clinics in the province can be found by checking the Manitoba flu clinics (click link below)

              Manitoba flu vaccine clinics


              http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/st...n1-danger.html
              "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
              -Nelson Mandela

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                October 29, 2009

                FLU BULLETIN #4

                H1N1 Flu Shots
                - The federal government is advising all provinces,
                including Manitoba, that there will be significantly less vaccine
                delivered than had been anticipated in the weeks ahead.
                -

                The initial delivery from the federal government of
                134,000 doses and a second delivery of 72,000 doses have already
                been distributed for use in clinics around the province. As of
                the end of day Oct. 28, there had been 67,078flu shots administered in Manitoba.

                - As a result, Manitobans who are not in the first
                priority group are asked to wait to get their flu
                shots. Manitoba's priority groups include those who are most at
                risk and would benefit the most from getting the shot. All
                Manitobans will have access the shot as soon as enough supply of
                the vaccine arrives. The first group of Manitobans who should
                get the H1N1 flu shot now include:

                - children aged six months to under five years old;

                - anyone of Aboriginal ancestry (First Nations, Métis or
                Inuit);

                - disadvantaged individuals (for example, the homeless);

                - people living in remote or isolated areas;

                - people under 65 with a chronic medical condition or
                other risk including severe obesity, substance abuse or
                alcoholism;

                - anyone with a weakened immune system or those who live
                with or care for them;

                - those who live with or care for infants under six months
                old;

                - single parents or anyone solely responsible for a
                dependent;

                - health-care workers and medical first responders; and

                - pregnant women who should consult with their doctor
                about the right type of vaccine to receive.

                - Regional health authorities (RHAs) may have to adjust
                their clinic schedules including postponing clinic dates until
                there is sufficient vaccine supply. RHAs will issue updates as
                their plans are adapted.

                - Next week, Manitoba will take delivery of vaccine that
                does not have an adjuvant. This vaccine is for pregnant
                women. Manitoba expects to receive approximately 8,200 doses of
                the Australia-based vaccine obtained by the federal government.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                  Winnipeg Free Press -

                  Front-line personnel want shots
                  MDs, medevac staff scrambling for vaccine

                  By: Carol Sanders
                  30/10/2009 |

                  When the first wave of the pandemic flu hit northern First Nations hard, air ambulance nurses and pilots took critically ill residents to intensive care units in Winnipeg.

                  Now that the second wave of H1N1 has arrived, air ambulance staff at private firms are scrambling to get the vaccine and protect themselves and their patients.

                  "It's been frustrating and demoralizing," said Penny Triggs, vice-president of air medical operations at Keewatin Air and a nurse who medevacs patients from fly-in communities.

                  "We all assumed nurses and pilots would get it," she said Thursday after leaving work to wait in line for the vaccine. "If the pilots get it (the flu), we don't fly." During the first H1N1 surge, Keewatin Air moved at least six critically ill flu patients on life-support to Winnipeg who ended up on ventilators.

                  "We're in an airplane sitting 18 inches from the person. There's not a lot of space between you and the individuals." Staff wear protective gear and have already moved some people suspected of being part of the second wave of H1N1 to Winnipeg, she said.

                  As part of a lifeline to the north, air ambulance staff expected to have quicker access to the vaccine and not have to wait in line hoping the clinics didn't run out.

                  For three days in a row, she and air ambulance staff went to the nearest H1N1 vaccine clinic on Portage Avenue. On Monday, the clinic ran out of vaccine. Another day, the lines were too long. On Thursday afternoon, she and two other nurses were able to get the vaccine -- just in time to head up north.

                  She said there are close to 75 air ambulance pilots and nurses in the province.

                  "I think it was a planning error," Triggs said. "For most of the organizations, they have an affiliation. We're all privately run companies."

                  "We put in an order for vaccine a long time ago. When we called them (last) Friday, they said 'we're not allowed to give it to you guys.' "

                  Triggs said air ambulance staff in Churchill were able to get the H1N1 vaccine quickly because there weren't lineups. Farther north, the vaccine is even harder to get than it is in Winnipeg, though.

                  "Staff at Rankin Inlet (in Nunavut) have not been able to get it," Triggs said.

                  "The other worrisome thing is this is a vulnerable population... if we get sick and don't have any symptoms yet, we don't want to give it to anybody. We want to keep our service running," she said.

                  A spokeswoman for Manitoba Health said late Thursday afternoon the provincial government would look into the private air ambulance concerns.

                  "I know it's an enormous thing to plan for," Triggs said.

                  The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority has clinics for its own staff at most hospitals and 28 community offices around the city.

                  On Thursday, the WRHA reminded primary care doctors and their staff that they can get the H1N1 vaccine at WRHA staff clinics, which have a shorter wait time than the clinics open to the general public.

                  "That's the first I've heard of it," said Dr. Dan Gerber at the South Sherbrook Health Centre.

                  Dr. Wilhelm Grobler hadn't heard of it, either.

                  "I haven't had a shot and I don't see myself getting one," Grobler said Thursday. The family practice doctor said he's too busy because of H1N1 anxiety.

                  "The public is anxious. We are actually swamped, with 60 to 80 patients a day," he said. "We don't have time to leave the clinic to stand in line for four hours when we're working till seven or eight at night."

                  When one family doctor who Gerber knows asked for the vaccine to administer to other doctors so they wouldn't have to leave their patients,

                  "The powers that be absolutely refused," Gerber said.

                  "Isn't there a nurse who could go around and give us our shot?" he asked.

                  "Is the only resolution to close our clinics, stand in line, and it takes an hour or two to give us a shot given by student nurses?"

                  Manitoba College of Physicians and Surgeons registrar Dr. Bill Pope said the logistics would be "pretty difficult."

                  Tory health critic Myrna Driedger, who trained as a nurse, said it would have been possible to get the vaccine to the family practice clinics.

                  "That kind of planning could've been done before we reached this stage," she said.
                  <!--1 $item-->


                  Flu numbers:

                  18,000 -- approximate number of Manitobans vaccinated against the seasonal flu in six-week immunization programs in past years
                  17,000 -- approximate number of Manitoba vaccinated against the seasonal flu in a three-day blitz this fall
                  67,078 -- number of H1N1 flu shots administered in Manitoba as of Wednesday
                  10,000 -- approximate number of health-care workers in Manitoba who've been vaccinated
                  unknown -- number of people in high-risk groups who've been vaccinated
                  134,000 -- number of doses of H1N1 vaccine produced by GlaxoSmithKline and sent to Manitoba by Ottawa
                  72,000 -- number of doses sent by Ottawa this week
                  unknown -- number of doses to be sent next Wednesday

                  People who fall under these categories should get an H1N1 flu shot right away:
                  children aged six months to under five years old;
                  anyone of aboriginal ancestry (First Nations, Métis or Inuit);
                  disadvantaged individuals (for example, the homeless);
                  people living in remote or isolated areas;
                  people under 65 with a chronic medical condition or other risk including severe obesity, substance abuse or alcoholism.

                  http://stage.www.winnipegfreepress.c...-67497567.html
                  "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                  -Nelson Mandela

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                    October 30, 2009

                    FLU BULLETIN #5


                    H1N1 Flu Shots
                    Manitoba has been advised the province will receive 15,500 doses
                    of vaccine next week, well below the expected 72,000 doses.

                    As a result, each region will be adjusting their plans according
                    to their population and geographic realities. Mass immunization
                    clinics may be postponed in some regions.

                    Many regions will continue to provide vaccine to people in the
                    first priority group with a particular emphasis for people most
                    at risk of severe illness. This includes targeting these
                    individuals on the priority list:

                    - children aged six months to under five years old;

                    - anyone of Aboriginal ancestry (First Nations, Métis or
                    Inuit);

                    - people under 55 with a severe chronic medical or other
                    risk condition; and

                    - pregnant women.

                    This focuses on the key populations in Manitoba's priority list
                    who are most at risk of severe illness or death. For more
                    details on how to access vaccine, please contact your local
                    regional health authority.

                    The initial delivery from the federal government of 134,000 doses
                    and a second delivery of

                    72,000 doses have already been distributed for use in clinics
                    around the province. As of the end of day Oct. 29, there had been
                    92,901 flu shots administered in Manitoba.

                    Next week, Manitoba will take delivery of vaccine that does not
                    have an adjuvant. This vaccine is for pregnant women. Manitoba
                    expects to receive approximately 9,200 doses of the
                    Australia-based vaccine obtained by the federal government.

                    Additional measures to help prevent flu infections include:

                    - Cover your cough by coughing into your elbow or sleeve
                    or use a tissue to cover your nose and mouth when coughing or
                    sneezing. Place the tissue in the garbage.

                    - Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially
                    after coughing or sneezing. Hand sanitizers may also be
                    effective.
                    - Reduce the spread of germs. Limit touching your eyes,
                    nose or mouth.

                    - Maintain your health by making healthy food choices,
                    being physically active and getting enough sleep.

                    For more information on H1N1 flu, visit www.manitoba.ca/flu or

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                      Short wait at Winnipeg H1N1 clinics

                      Last Updated: Wednesday, November 4, 2009 | 12:32 PM CT

                      CBC News


                      The long lineups that plagued Winnipeg's H1N1 vaccination clinics last week are non-existent Wednesday.

                      The lack of a line at most of the 12 clinics in the city prompted the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority to publicly call on for those who want a shot — and fall into one of the priority categories — to come on down.

                      "There are very short, almost negligible lineups at almost all of our clinics. If someone is interested in one of those groups to come down and get vaccinated, that would be a great thing," said WRHA spokeswoman Heidi Graham.

                      At many of the clinics last week, the lineups stretched hundreds of people long, and it took more than three hours to get to the front in some locations.

                      On Monday of this week, the line at the River Heights clinic inside the Grant Park Shopping Centre was 500-strong by the time the doors opened at 9:30 a.m.
                      'We really want to get the word out because we know there has been lots of media reports about long lineups and so people may be staying away because they fear long lineups.' Heidi Graham, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority
                      The demand was driven by concerns about the vaccine supply after health officials stated that Manitoba was expecting significantly reduced supplies in the coming week.

                      On Tuesday, the clinics in Winnipeg and Brandon were closed due to the shortage.
                      But late Tuesday evening, the WRHA announced that all 12 clinics in the city would reopen for Wednesday.

                      A larger proportion of the vaccine was returned from occupational clinics, and less than initially anticipated was used Monday. A large number of those vaccinated Monday were children who require just a half-dose, Graham said.

                      As well, the WRHA started enforcing a strict screening process this week to make sure those in line fell into one of four priority groups.

                      With those measures, the WRHA counted 12,000 available doses for Wednesday with a shipment of 8,000 more doses expected later this week.

                      The health region also has approximately 4,300 doses of vaccine without adjuvant — an additive that boosts a vaccine's effectiveness — for pregnant women.

                      Clinics will continue to operate this week for as long as vaccine is available, Graham said.

                      "The clinics today started off with much less activity than they have in the past, so we really want to get the word out because we know there has been lots of media reports about long lineups and so people may be staying away because they fear long lineups," Graham said.


                      As a result of the low turnout on Wednesday, the WRHA decided to expand its priority list from four categories to 10:
                      • Children aged six months to five years.
                      • Anyone of aboriginal ancestry (First Nations, Métis or Inuit).
                      • Disadvantaged individuals (for example, the homeless).
                      • People living in remote or isolated areas.
                      • People under 65 with a chronic medical condition or other risks, such as severe obesity, drug abuse or alcoholism.
                      • Anyone with a weakened immune system or those who live with or care for such people.
                      • Those who live with or care for infants younger than six months old.
                      • Single parents or anyone solely responsible for a dependant.
                      • Health-care workers and medical first responders.
                      • Pregnant women.
                      If people are in a priority group they should get inoculated as soon as possible because it takes about a week or so for the vaccine to take effect, Graham said.

                      http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/st...-winnipeg.html
                      "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                      -Nelson Mandela

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                        Daycare workers shut out from swine flu shots

                        Decision based on flu's first wave, when child-care workers weren't hit hard, minister says

                        Last Updated: Wednesday, November 4, 2009 | 10:20 PM CT

                        CBC News


                        Children at daycares can easily pass along a cold or flu, say child-care workers, who are upset they aren't near the front of the line for H1N1 vaccinations. (CBC)


                        The Manitoba Childcare Association is chafing over provincial guidelines that leave daycare workers off the list of priority recipients for swine flu shots.

                        Excluding early childhood educators from the list of priority categories to get the H1N1 vaccine first doesn't make sense, the association said Wednesday.

                        Daycares are prime targets for influenza viruses and other communicable illnesses such as colds, said Pat Wege, the group's executive director.
                        Wege said that if children get sick, daycare staff will likely also be calling in sick, potentially causing the child-care system to screech to a halt.
                        'Clinics in daycares or schools could actually slow us down.'— Theresa Oswald, Manitoba health minister
                        She said she recently surveyed 100 Manitoba daycares, and one in five reported unusually high levels of absenteeism.

                        "It won't take many sick phone calls before the program is in trouble for the day," Wege said.

                        The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority expanded its priority list to 10 groups from four on Wednesday, but child-care workers weren't on it.

                        On the list are:
                        • Children aged six months to under five years old.
                        • Anyone of aboriginal ancestry.
                        • Disadvantaged individuals (for example, the homeless).
                        • People living in remote or isolated areas.
                        • People under 65 with a chronic medical condition or other risks, including severe obesity, substance abuse or alcoholism.
                        • Anyone with a weakened immune system or those who live with or care for them.
                        • Those who live with or care for infants under six months old.
                        • Single parents or anyone solely responsible for a dependent.
                        • Health-care workers and medical first responders.
                        • Pregnant women.
                        Carol Jones of the St. Germaine Daycare Centre in Winnipeg's St. Vital neighbourhood said not one of her 14 staff members has yet had a swine flu shot.

                        "It's too bad," she said, that daycare workers weren't made a priority. "Child care is an essential public service."

                        Wege said she thinks health officials should have held mass immunization clinics at provincial daycares to vaccinate children and staff at the same time.

                        But Manitoba Health Minister Theresa Oswald said this would have been too complicated to set up and schedule.

                        "The option that we are using right now in the mass clinics is actually proving to be very swift throughput of individuals," She said. "It is arguable that these clinics in daycares or schools could actually slow us down."

                        Oswald defended the decision by health officials to exclude daycare workers from the priority list.

                        "Our decision is based on sound medical science," she said. Childhood educators were not hit heavily by the first wave of H1N1 in the spring, she said.

                        Just under 1,500 Winnipeggers had been vaccinated by noon on Wednesday, bringing the cumulative total in the city to 78,265.


                        http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/st...hots-h1n1.html
                        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                        -Nelson Mandela

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                          Winnipeg closes H1N1 clinics until next week

                          Vaccine shortage delays shots until next Thursday

                          Last Updated: Saturday, November 7, 2009 | 9:39 AM ET

                          CBC News


                          People in Winnipeg won't be able to get an H1N1 flu shot until next Thursday because of a vaccine shortage, the regional health authority announced late Friday.

                          The agency said it was out of vaccine and clinics scheduled for Monday and Tuesday will not open as planned. The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority does not run clinics on weekends.

                          It will also not open any clinics on the Nov. 11 Remembrance Day holiday.

                          As of noon Friday, the authority reported 96,422 people in Winnipeg had been vaccinated against the strain of H1N1 influenza A virus responsible for the current swine flu pandemic.

                          The authority said that when clinics reopen Thursday, the criteria for vaccination will be the same as they have been in recent days.

                          The priority groups are:
                          • Children between the ages of six months and five years
                          • People of aboriginal background.
                          • Disadvantaged people, such as the homeless.
                          • People from remote or isolated areas.
                          • People under 65 with a chronic medical condition or other risk factor.
                          • Anyone with a weakened immune system, and their caregiver.
                          • Anyone who cares for an infant under six months.
                          • Single parents or anyone solely responsible for a dependent.
                          • Health-care workers and first-responders.
                          • Pregnant women.

                          http://www.cbc.ca/health/story/2009/...ics-close.html
                          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                          -Nelson Mandela

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                            School-aged children added to H1N1 flu-shot priority list

                            By: Staff Writer
                            11/11/2009 2:15 PM |

                            WINNIPEG - Manitoba children up to 18 years of age have been added to the H1N1 flu vaccination priority list.

                            Provincial health officials said the vaccine will be offered to all children because emergency rooms and doctors are seeing more kids with influenza-like symptoms, and because more kids are missing school because of illness.

                            "Providing H1N1 flu shots to school-age children should help reduce the spread of disease to others and help protect all family members who may be at risk. It should also reduce the risk of and help to address concern about severe illness and death in school-aged children," officials said Wednesday in a release.

                            Each regional health authority is adapting their H1N1 flu shot clinics to meet the needs of their population.

                            In Winnipeg, a satellite clinic will open Thursday evening at Children’s Hospital to ease the demands on the emergency room department. It will be staffed by a pediatrician and nursing staff Thursday and Friday from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

                            Children can also be vaccinated at any of the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority clinics, which reopen Thursday morning at 9:30 a.m.
                            So far, more than 101,000 people have been vaccinated in the WRHA clinics.

                            http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/bre...-69782812.html
                            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                            -Nelson Mandela

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Manitoba - Novel H1N1 Vaccine Availability

                              2 Winnipeg H1N1 clinics open for weekend

                              First Saturday and Sunday openings

                              Last Updated: Friday, November 13, 2009 | 10:08 AM CT

                              CBC News


                              The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority is opening two clinics this weekend for H1N1 vaccinations. (CBC)

                              Two H1N1 flu vaccination clinics are being opened this weekend in Winnipeg.

                              It will be the first time since the mass immunization campaign started on Oct. 26 that clinics have opened on Saturday and Sunday.

                              Vaccinations will be done at the University of Manitoba, on the second floor of the University Centre, and at the Philippine Canadian Centre of Manitoba, at 737 Keewatin St. The clinics will be open from 9:30 a.m. until 4 p.m.

                              Winnipeg's 12 vaccination clinics reopened Thursday morning after being closed since last Friday evening due to a shortage of the product, but the province has since received several more batches.

                              That prompted health officials to expand the priority list of those who should get the shot before the general population. All children under the age of 18 were added to the list Thursday. Before then, only those aged six months to five years were considered at priority risk of becoming seriously ill.

                              100,000 cases in Manitoba

                              Health officials said Thursday the number of lab-confirmed cases of H1N1 in the province has spiked, with 225 new ones confirmed in the past week, bringing the total of recent cases to 291, in addition to roughly 900 confirmed cases from the spring outbreak of swine flu.

                              But Dr. Joel Kettner, the province's chief medical officer of health, said the actual number of Manitobans who have contracted the virus is likely 100,000.

                              He told CBC News on Friday that he has not released this number publicly before but feels confident doing so now.

                              He also stressed that the vast majority of illnesses have been very mild, and people don't bother to get tested.

                              There has been one death this fall attributed to complications from the illness. There were seven deaths in the spring outbreak.

                              More vaccine coming

                              This week the province received 36,500 doses of vaccine with adjuvant — chemicals that boost a vaccine's effectiveness —- and distributed them to regional health authorities. Provincial officials are expecting another 43,500 doses of adjuvanted vaccine next week.

                              In addition, Manitoba has received 9,200 doses of an Australian-made adjuvant-free vaccine for pregnant women, health officials said Thursday.

                              And 39,900 doses of a Canadian-made vaccine without an adjuvant have also arrived in the province. That vaccine has not yet been licensed but is expected to be soon, health officials said.

                              In preparation for that, the vaccine was shipped Thursday to the regional health authorities, so they have it on hand once the approval is given.



                              The province's priority list includes the following:
                              • Children six months to age 17.
                              • Anyone of aboriginal ancestry (First Nations, Métis or Inuit).
                              • Disadvantaged individuals (for example, the homeless).
                              • People living in remote or isolated areas.
                              • People under 65 with a chronic medical condition or other risk including obesity, substance abuse or alcoholism.
                              • Anyone with a weakened immune system or those who live with or care for them.
                              • Those who live with or care for infants under six months old.
                              • Single parents or anyone solely responsible for a dependant.
                              • Health-care workers and medical first responders.
                              • Pregnant women.
                              Across the province, close to 200,000 shots have been given since clinics opened on Oct. 26.

                              As of 4 p.m. on Thursday, 106,302 people had received shots in Winnipeg. Clinics operated by the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority are scheduled to run until Dec. 4.

                              Regular hours for the clinics are Monday to Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

                              Locations of the Winnipeg clinics are on the map below. Clinics outside the city can be found by visiting Manitoba Health's H1N1 website by clicking the link on the top right of this story.

                              http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/st...-winnipeg.html
                              "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                              -Nelson Mandela

                              Comment

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