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Canada FluWatch Weekly Reports 2010-2011 Season Week 20 - 224 deaths total (excluding BC, QC, NB and NU)

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  • #61
    Re: Canada FluWatch Weekly Reports 2010-2011 Season Week 16 - 221 deaths total (excluding BC, QC, NB and NU)

    <TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR><TD>April 17 to 23, 2011 (Week 16)

    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


    Posted 2011-04-29

    Overall Influenza Summary
    • In week 16, influenza activity in Canada continues to decline.
    • The overall percentage of influenza positive specimens continues to decrease.
    • Fewer regions reported localized influenza activity this week compared to the previous week although slightly more outbreaks were reported, all in the Atlantic provinces.
    • The ILI consultation rate decreased, and both adult and paediatric hospitalizations with influenza were similar to the previous week.

    Influenza Activity and Outbreaks

    In week 16, 9 regions reported localized activity: ON(1), NB(2), NS(4), and NL(2); 28 regions reported sporadic activity (in BC(3), AB(5), SK(3), MB(3), ON(4), QC(6), NB(2), YK(1) and NU(1)) and 19 regions presented no activity (see Activity level Map). Compared to the previous week (week 15), 8 regions reported an increased level of influenza activity, 17 regions reported decreased activity, and 23 regions maintained a stable level of influenza activity (sporadic or higher). Fourteen new outbreaks were reported: 7 outbreaks of influenza in long-term care facilities (LTCF) in NS(5), NB(1) and NL(1); 1 outbreak of influenza in a hospital in NS; 5 ILI outbreaks in schools in NS(3), and NB(2); and one outbreak of ILI in another facility in NL.

    Map of overall Influenza activity level by province and territory, Canada, Week 16





    No Data

    No Activity

    Sporadic Activity

    Localized Activity

    Widespread Activity



    Note: Influenza activity levels, as represented on this map, are assigned and reported by Provincial and Territorial Ministries of Health, based on laboratory confirmations, sentinel ILI rates (see graphs and tables) and reported outbreaks. Please refer to detailed definitions on the last page. For areas where no data is reported, late reports from these provinces and territories will appear on the FluWatch website.
    Text Equivalent

    Number of influenza surveillance regions<SUP title="sub-regions within the province or territory as defined by the provincial/territorial epidemiologist. Graph may change as late returns come in"></SUP> reporting widespread or localized influenza activity, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011 (N=56)


    sub-regions within the province or territory as defined by the provincial/territorial epidemiologist. Graph may change as late returns come in.
    Text Equivalent


    Top of Page

    Overall Number of Influenza Outbreaks, Canada, by Report Week, 2010-2011


    Note that this was the first year that all the provinces and territories were reporting on influenza outbreaks in schools (greater than 10% absenteeism on any day most likely due to ILI) which has increased considerably the total number of outbreaks reported compared to previous years.
    Text Equivalent
    ILI consultation rate
    During week 16, the national ILI consultation rate was 16.7 consultations per 1,000 patient visits, which is decreased compared to the previous week and is within the expected rate for this time of year (see ILI graph). Children 5-19 years of age had the highest consultation rates (45.3 per 1,000 consultations), followed by children under 5 years of age (19.9 per 1,000 consultations) in week 16.
    Influenza-like illness (ILI) consultation rates, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011 compared to 1996/97 through to 2008/09 seasons


    Note: No data available for mean rate in previous years for weeks 19 to 39 (1996-1997 through 2002-2003 seasons). Delays in the reporting of data may cause data to change retrospectively.
    Text Equivalent
    Laboratory Surveillance Summary
    The overall proportion of tests that were positive for influenza during week 16 was 7.2% (1.9% influenza A, 5.3% influenza B), which is decreased compared to week 15 (10.3%) and the third week in which more influenza B detections were reported than influenza A. The proportion of positive tests peaked in week 52 (see Influenza tests graph). Since the beginning of the season, 86.8% (16,320/18,810) of influenza virus detections have been influenza A viruses, of which 84.7% (5,446/6,431) of subtyped specimens have been A/H3N2. Detections of influenza B have been increasing steadily since week 03 and appear to have reached a peak in week 15. Among influenza A detections in week 16, 20 (36.4%) specimens were reported as influenza A/H3N2, 1 (1.8%) as pandemic H1N1 2009, and 34 (61.8%) as unsubtyped influenza A. Through detailed case-based laboratory reporting where age data is provided, since August 29, 2010, 50.8% (2049/4033) of cases with A/H3N2 were aged 65 years or older. In contrast, the majority of cases with pandemic H1N1 2009 (94.5%, 741/784) and influenza B (90.2%, 1246/1381) were under 65 years of age (see Tests detailed table). In week 16, the proportion of positive tests for respiratory syncytial virus detections (RSV) decreased to 9.2% of specimens tested. The proportion of positive RSV tests appears to have peaked in week 07. Since week 11, the proportion of positive tests for parainfluenza viruses has been increasing, reaching 5.8% in week 16, predominantly due to parainfluenza type 3 (51.4%) and type 1 (38.1%). (See Respiratory viruses graph).
    Weekly & Cumulative numbers of positive influenza specimens by Provincial Laboratories, Canada, 2010-2011

    <TABLE class=widthFull border=1 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2><TFOOT><TR><TD class=fontSize85 colSpan=13>* Unsubtyped: The specimen was typed as influenza A, but no test for subtyping was performed. Specimens from NT, YT, and NU are sent to reference laboratories in other provinces. Note: Cumulative data includes updates to previous weeks; due to reporting delays, the sum of weekly report totals do not add up to cumulative totals.
    </TD></TR></TFOOT><TBODY><TR class=alignCenter><TH class=bg-colour-blue rowSpan=3 scope=col>Reporting provinces</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=6 scope=colgroup>Weekly (April 17 to April 23, 2011)</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=6 scope=colgroup>Cumulative (August 29, 2010 to April 23, 2011)</TH></TR><TR class=alignCenter><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" scope=col>B</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=col>B</TH></TR><TR class=alignCenter><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H1)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H3)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Pand H1N1</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue noWrap" scope=col>A (Un S)*</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H1)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H3)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Pand H1N1</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue noWrap" scope=col>A (Un S)*</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Total</TH></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>BC</TH><TD class=alignCenter>4</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>476</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>199</TD><TD class=alignCenter>164</TD><TD class=alignCenter>113</TD><TD class=alignCenter>176</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>AB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>10</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>7</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>25</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1042</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>734</TD><TD class=alignCenter>270</TD><TD class=alignCenter>38</TD><TD class=alignCenter>687</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>SK</TH><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>24</TD><TD class=alignCenter>313</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>210</TD><TD class=alignCenter>30</TD><TD class=alignCenter>73</TD><TD class=alignCenter>148</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>MB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>515</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>56</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>457</TD><TD class=alignCenter>12</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>ON</TH><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>39</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6874</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2435</TD><TD class=alignCenter>272</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4167</TD><TD class=alignCenter>779</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>QC</TH><TD class=alignCenter>16</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>16</TD><TD class=alignCenter>51</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5616</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>877</TD><TD class=alignCenter>38</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4701</TD><TD class=alignCenter>595</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>943</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>662</TD><TD class=alignCenter>176</TD><TD class=alignCenter>105</TD><TD class=alignCenter>68</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NS</TH><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>257</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>80</TD><TD class=alignCenter>11</TD><TD class=alignCenter>166</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>PE</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>97</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>79</TD><TD class=alignCenter>16</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NL</TH><TD class=alignCenter>7</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>7</TD><TD class=alignCenter>8</TD><TD class=alignCenter>187</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>114</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>67</TD><TD class=alignCenter>16</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>Canada</TH><TD class=alignCenter>55</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>20</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>34</TD><TD class=alignCenter>157</TD><TD class=alignCenter>16320</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5446</TD><TD class=alignCenter>985</TD><TD class=alignCenter>9889</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2490</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

    Weekly & Cumulative numbers of positive influenza specimens by age groups reported through case-based laboratory reporting, Canada, 2010-2011*

    <TABLE class=widthFull border=1 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2><TFOOT><TR><TD class=fontSize85 colSpan=11> * Please note that this table reflects the number of specimens for which demographic information was reported. These represent a subset of all positive influenza cases reported. Five provinces have reported detailed case-by-case data since the beginning of the season (BC, AB, SK, MB and ON). Delays in the reporting of data may cause data to change retrospectively.
    </TD></TR></TFOOT><TBODY><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH rowSpan=3 scope=col>Age groups</TH><TH colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Weekly
    (April 17 to April 23, 2011)</TH><TH colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Cumulative
    (Aug. 29, 2010 to Apr. 23, 2011)
    </TH></TR><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH colSpan=4 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH>B</TH><TH colSpan=4 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH>B</TH></TR><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH scope=col>A Total</TH><TH scope=col>Pandemic H1N1</TH><TH scope=col>A/H3N2</TH><TH scope=col>A unsubtyped</TH><TH scope=col>Total</TH><TH scope=col>A Total</TH><TH scope=col>Pandemic H1N1</TH><TH scope=col>A/H3N2</TH><TH scope=col>A unsubtyped</TH><TH scope=col>Total</TH></TR><TR><TD><5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>10</TD><TD class=alignCenter>999</TD><TD class=alignCenter>126</TD><TD class=alignCenter>728</TD><TD class=alignCenter>145</TD><TD class=alignCenter>367</TD></TR><TR><TD>5-19</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>7</TD><TD class=alignCenter>517</TD><TD class=alignCenter>103</TD><TD class=alignCenter>296</TD><TD class=alignCenter>118</TD><TD class=alignCenter>499</TD></TR><TR><TD>20-44</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1071</TD><TD class=alignCenter>327</TD><TD class=alignCenter>528</TD><TD class=alignCenter>216</TD><TD class=alignCenter>270</TD></TR><TR><TD>45-64</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>785</TD><TD class=alignCenter>185</TD><TD class=alignCenter>432</TD><TD class=alignCenter>168</TD><TD class=alignCenter>110</TD></TR><TR><TD>65+</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2484</TD><TD class=alignCenter>43</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2049</TD><TD class=alignCenter>392</TD><TD class=alignCenter>135</TD></TR><TR><TD>Unknown</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>231</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>224</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD></TR><TR><TD>Total</TD><TD class=alignCenter>14</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>8</TD><TD class=alignCenter>24</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6087</TD><TD class=alignCenter>787</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4257</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1043</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1382</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


    Top of Page

    Influenza tests reported and percentage of tests positive, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011


    Text Equivalent

    Percent positive influenza tests, compared to other respiratory viruses, Canada, by reporting week, 2010-2011


    Text Equivalent
    Canadian situation

    Antigenic Characterization
    Between September 1 and April 28, 2011, the National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) has antigenically characterized 804 influenza viruses that were received from provincial laboratories: 252 A/H3N2, 137 pandemic H1N1 2009 and 415 B viruses. Of the 252 influenza A/H3N2 viruses characterized, 249 (98.8%) were antigenically related to A/Perth/16/2009, which is the influenza A/H3N2 component recommended for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. Three viruses (1.2%) tested showed reduced titer with antiserum produced against A/Perth/16/2009. Of the 137 pandemic H1N1 2009 viruses characterized, 136 (99.3%) were antigenically related to the pandemic vaccine virus A/California/7/2009, which is the recommended H1N1 component for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. One virus (0.7%) tested showed reduced titer with antiserum produced against A/California/7/2009. Of the 415 influenza B viruses characterized, 396 (95.4%) were antigenically related to B/Brisbane/60/08 (Victoria lineage), which is the recommended influenza B component for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. Four of the 396 viruses tested showed reduced titer with antisera produced against B/Brisbane/60/08. Nineteen (4.6%) influenza B viruses were characterized as B/Wisconsin/01/2010-like, which belongs to the Yamagata lineage. B/Wisconsin/01/2010-like viruses are antigenically and genetically different from the previous Yamagata lineage vaccine strain B/Florida/04/2006.
    Antiviral Resistance
    Since the beginning of the 2010-2011 season, NML has tested 591 influenza A isolates (445 A/H3N2 and 146 pandemic H1N1 2009) for amantadine resistance and found that 444 influenza A/H3N2 were resistant and one was sensitive. All 146 influenza A/H1N1 viruses were resistant to amantadine. Of 643 influenza viruses (228 A/H3N2, 124 pandemic H1N1 2009, and 291 influenza B) tested for resistance to oseltamivir, 227 A/H3N2 viruses were sensitive and one was resistant with E119V mutation. The resistant case was associated with oseltamivir prophylaxis/treatment. Of the 124 pandemic H1N1 2009 isolates tested for oseltamivir resistance, 123 were sensitive and one was resistant with the H275Y mutation. The resistant case was associated with oseltamivir treatment. All 291 B viruses were sensitive to oseltamivir. Of 633 influenza viruses (224 A/H3N2, 121 pandemic H1N1 2009, and 288 influenza B) tested for zanamivir resistance all isolates were found to be sensitive.
    Severe Illness Surveillance

    Paediatric Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
    In week 16, 7 new laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated paediatric (16 years of age and under) hospitalizations were reported through the Immunization Monitoring Program Active (IMPACT) network: 2 from AB, 2 from SK and 3 from QC. This number is similar to the previous week (week 15) in which 6 paediatric hospitalizations were reported (note that numbers may fluctuate because of the delays in reporting). Five paediatric deaths have been reported via IMPACT this season all with underlying comorbidities.
    Since the beginning of the season, 632 hospitalizations with laboratory-confirmed influenza have been reported: 102 (16.1%) as influenza A/H3N2, 22 (3.5%) pandemic H1N1 2009, 327 (51.7%) as unsubytped influenza A, and 181 (28.6%) influenza B. The distribution of cases to date by age group was as follows: 16.8% among 0-5 month olds; 28.2% among 6-23 month olds; 28.8% among the 2-4 year-olds; 15.3% among 5-9 year-olds; and 10.9% among children 10-16 years old.

    Adult Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
    During week 16, 4 new hospitalizations with laboratory-confirmed influenza among adults (16 years of age and older) were reported through the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP), 3 influenza B and 1 influenza A/H3N2. This number is similar to the 5 cases reported in week 15 (note that numbers may fluctuate because of the delays in reporting). Since the beginning of the season, 952 hospitalized cases have been reported: 202 (21.2%) A/H3N2, 45 (4.7%) pandemic H1N1 2009, 640 (67.2%) influenza A unsubtyped, and 65 (6.8%) influenza B, from all reporting provinces. To date, 642 of the 952 (67.4%) cases were aged 65 years or older and 430 (45.2%) were males.

    Aggregate Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
    Nine provinces and territories (excluding BC, QC, NB and NU) currently conduct severe outcomes surveillance and report weekly numbers of hospitalizations, ICU admissions and deaths with laboratory-confirmed influenza. In week 16, no deaths with influenza were reported. Among the 221 fatal cases reported since the beginning of the influenza season, influenza A/H3N2 was identified in 61.1% (135/221), unsubtyped influenza A in 28.5% (63/221), pandemic H1N1 2009 in 5.9% (13/221), and influenza B in 4.5% (10/221). Eighty percent (176/221) of these fatal cases were among persons 65 years of age or older, and another 11% (24/221) were between the ages of 45 and 64 years old, in keeping with the age-groups usually affected by A/H3N2. (Note that numbers may fluctuate because of the delays in reporting).

    .../
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    Comment


    • #62
      Re: Canada FluWatch Weekly Reports 2010-2011 Season Week 17 - 221 deaths total (excluding BC, QC, NB and NU)

      <TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR><TD>April 24 to 30, 2011 (Week 17)


      </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
      </B>

      Posted 2011-05-06


      Overall Influenza Summary
      • In week 17, influenza activity in Canada continues to decline with only a few pockets of localized influenza activity in Ontario and the Atlantic provinces.
      • Influenza B continues to be detected more frequently than influenza A, however, the overall percentage of influenza positive specimens continues to decrease.
      • This week the number of outbreaks reported decreased considerably, as well as the ILI consultation rate. Both adult and paediatric hospitalizations with influenza are also low.
      Influenza Activity and Outbreaks

      In week 17, 5 regions reported localized activity: ON(1), NB(1), NS(1), and NL(2); 36 regions reported sporadic activity (in all provinces and territories except PE and YT) and 15 regions presented no activity (see Activity level Map). Compared to the previous week (week 16), 8 regions reported an increased level of influenza activity, 8 regions reported decreased activity, and 28 regions maintained a stable level of influenza activity (sporadic or higher). Five new outbreaks were reported: 1 outbreak of influenza in long-term care facilities (LTCF) in NL; 3 ILI outbreaks in schools in NB; and one outbreak of ILI in another facility in NL.

      Map of overall Influenza activity level by province and territory, Canada, Week 17





      No Data

      No Activity

      Sporadic Activity

      Localized Activity

      Widespread Activity



      Note: Influenza activity levels, as represented on this map, are assigned and reported by Provincial and Territorial Ministries of Health, based on laboratory confirmations, sentinel ILI rates (see graphs and tables) and reported outbreaks. Please refer to detailed definitions on the last page. For areas where no data is reported, late reports from these provinces and territories will appear on the FluWatch website.
      Text Equivalent

      Number of influenza surveillance regions<SUP title="sub-regions within the province or territory as defined by the provincial/territorial epidemiologist. Graph may change as late returns come in"></SUP> reporting widespread or localized influenza activity, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011 (N=56)


      sub-regions within the province or territory as defined by the provincial/territorial epidemiologist. Graph may change as late returns come in.
      Text Equivalent


      Top of Page

      Overall Number of Influenza Outbreaks, Canada, by Report Week, 2010-2011


      Note that this was the first year that all the provinces and territories were reporting on influenza outbreaks in schools (greater than 10% absenteeism on any day most likely due to ILI) which has increased considerably the total number of outbreaks reported compared to previous years.
      Text Equivalent
      ILI consultation rate
      During week 17, the national ILI consultation rate was 10.5 consultations per 1,000 patient visits, which is decreased compared to the previous week and is within the expected rate for this time of year (see ILI graph). Children under 5 years of age had the highest consultation rates (23.6 per 1,000 consultations), followed by children 5-19 years of age (12.9 per 1,000 consultations) in week 17.
      Influenza-like illness (ILI) consultation rates, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011 compared to 1996/97 through to 2008/09 seasons


      Note: No data available for mean rate in previous years for weeks 19 to 39 (1996-1997 through 2002-2003 seasons). Delays in the reporting of data may cause data to change retrospectively.
      Text Equivalent
      Laboratory Surveillance Summary
      The overall proportion of tests that were positive for influenza during week 17 was 7.0% (2.3% influenza A, 4.7% influenza B), which is similar to week 16 (7.1%). The proportion of positive tests peaked in week 52 (see Influenza tests graph). Since the beginning of the season, 86.1% (16,395/19,041) of influenza virus detections have been influenza A viruses, of which 84.7% (5,467/6,456) of subtyped specimens have been A/H3N2. Detections of influenza B have been increasing steadily since week 03 and appear to have reached a peak in week 15. Among influenza A detections in week 17, 19 (25.7%) specimens were reported as influenza A/H3N2, 2 (2.7%) as pandemic H1N1 2009, and 53 (71.6%) as unsubtyped influenza A. Through detailed case-based laboratory reporting where age data is provided, since August 29, 2010, 50.8% (2,058/4,049) of cases with A/H3N2 were aged 65 years or older. In contrast, the majority of cases with pandemic H1N1 2009 (94.4%, 745/789) and influenza B (90.2%, 1,295/1,435) were under 65 years of age (see Tests detailed table). In week 17, the proportion of positive tests for respiratory syncytial virus detections (RSV) were similar to the previous week at 9.2% of specimens tested. The proportion of positive RSV tests appears to have peaked in week 07. Since week 11, the proportion of positive tests for parainfluenza viruses has been increasing, reaching 6.2% in week 17, predominantly due to parainfluenza type 3 (51.4%) and type 1 (36.7%). (See Respiratory viruses graph).
      Weekly & Cumulative numbers of positive influenza specimens by Provincial Laboratories, Canada, 2010-2011

      <TABLE class=widthFull border=1 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2><TFOOT><TR><TD class=fontSize85 colSpan=13>* Unsubtyped: The specimen was typed as influenza A, but no test for subtyping was performed. Specimens from NT, YT, and NU are sent to reference laboratories in other provinces. Note: Cumulative data includes updates to previous weeks; due to reporting delays, the sum of weekly report totals do not add up to cumulative totals.

      </TD></TR></TFOOT><TBODY><TR class=alignCenter><TH class=bg-colour-blue rowSpan=3 scope=col>Reporting provinces</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=6 scope=colgroup>Weekly (April 24 to April 30, 2011)</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=6 scope=colgroup>Cumulative (August 29, 2010 to April 30, 2011)</TH></TR><TR class=alignCenter><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" scope=col>B</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=col>B</TH></TR><TR class=alignCenter><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H1)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H3)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Pand H1N1</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue noWrap" scope=col>A (Un S)*</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H1)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H3)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Pand H1N1</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue noWrap" scope=col>A (Un S)*</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Total</TH></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>BC</TH><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>477</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>200</TD><TD class=alignCenter>164</TD><TD class=alignCenter>113</TD><TD class=alignCenter>178</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>AB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>14</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>12</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>25</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1057</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>748</TD><TD class=alignCenter>273</TD><TD class=alignCenter>36</TD><TD class=alignCenter>715</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>SK</TH><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>13</TD><TD class=alignCenter>315</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>211</TD><TD class=alignCenter>30</TD><TD class=alignCenter>74</TD><TD class=alignCenter>161</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>MB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>515</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>56</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>457</TD><TD class=alignCenter>13</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>ON</TH><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>26</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6879</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2437</TD><TD class=alignCenter>273</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4169</TD><TD class=alignCenter>805</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>QC</TH><TD class=alignCenter>19</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>19</TD><TD class=alignCenter>46</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5635</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>877</TD><TD class=alignCenter>38</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4720</TD><TD class=alignCenter>641</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>25</TD><TD class=alignCenter>949</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>665</TD><TD class=alignCenter>176</TD><TD class=alignCenter>108</TD><TD class=alignCenter>93</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NS</TH><TD class=alignCenter>12</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>12</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>269</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>80</TD><TD class=alignCenter>11</TD><TD class=alignCenter>178</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>PE</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>97</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>79</TD><TD class=alignCenter>16</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NL</TH><TD class=alignCenter>15</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>15</TD><TD class=alignCenter>13</TD><TD class=alignCenter>202</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>114</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>82</TD><TD class=alignCenter>29</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>Canada</TH><TD class=alignCenter>74</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>19</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>53</TD><TD class=alignCenter>153</TD><TD class=alignCenter>16395</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5467</TD><TD class=alignCenter>989</TD><TD class=alignCenter>9939</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2646</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

      Weekly & Cumulative numbers of positive influenza specimens by age groups reported through case-based laboratory reporting, Canada, 2010-2011*

      <TABLE class=widthFull border=1 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2><TFOOT><TR><TD class=fontSize85 colSpan=11>* Please note that this table reflects the number of specimens for which demographic information was reported. These represent a subset of all positive influenza cases reported. Five provinces have reported detailed case-by-case data since the beginning of the season (BC, AB, SK, MB and ON). Delays in the reporting of data may cause data to change retrospectively.

      </TD></TR></TFOOT><TBODY><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH rowSpan=3 scope=col>Age groups</TH><TH colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Weekly
      (April 24 to April 30, 2011)
      </TH><TH colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Cumulative
      (Aug. 29, 2010 to Apr. 30, 2011)

      </TH></TR><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH colSpan=4 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH>B</TH><TH colSpan=4 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH>B</TH></TR><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH scope=col>A Total</TH><TH scope=col>Pandemic H1N1</TH><TH scope=col>A/H3N2</TH><TH scope=col>A unsubtyped</TH><TH scope=col>Total</TH><TH scope=col>A Total</TH><TH scope=col>Pandemic H1N1</TH><TH scope=col>A/H3N2</TH><TH scope=col>A unsubtyped</TH><TH scope=col>Total</TH></TR><TR><TD><5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>10</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>7</TD><TD class=alignCenter>10</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1005</TD><TD class=alignCenter>127</TD><TD class=alignCenter>733</TD><TD class=alignCenter>145</TD><TD class=alignCenter>386</TD></TR><TR><TD>5-19</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>7</TD><TD class=alignCenter>516</TD><TD class=alignCenter>103</TD><TD class=alignCenter>296</TD><TD class=alignCenter>117</TD><TD class=alignCenter>515</TD></TR><TR><TD>20-44</TD><TD class=alignCenter>7</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1075</TD><TD class=alignCenter>328</TD><TD class=alignCenter>528</TD><TD class=alignCenter>219</TD><TD class=alignCenter>284</TD></TR><TR><TD>45-64</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>788</TD><TD class=alignCenter>187</TD><TD class=alignCenter>434</TD><TD class=alignCenter>167</TD><TD class=alignCenter>110</TD></TR><TR><TD>65+</TD><TD class=alignCenter>17</TD><TD class=alignCenter>8</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2505</TD><TD class=alignCenter>44</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2058</TD><TD class=alignCenter>403</TD><TD class=alignCenter>140</TD></TR><TR><TD>Unknown</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>231</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>224</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD></TR><TR><TD>Total</TD><TD class=alignCenter>41</TD><TD class=alignCenter>12</TD><TD class=alignCenter>8</TD><TD class=alignCenter>21</TD><TD class=alignCenter>24</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6120</TD><TD class=alignCenter>792</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4273</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1055</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1436</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


      Top of Page

      Influenza tests reported and percentage of tests positive, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011


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      Percent positive influenza tests, compared to other respiratory viruses, Canada, by reporting week, 2010-2011


      Text Equivalent
      Canadian situation

      Antigenic Characterization
      Between September 1 and May 5, 2011, the National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) has antigenically characterized 875 influenza viruses that were received from provincial laboratories: 261 A/H3N2, 138 pandemic H1N1 2009 and 476 B viruses. Of the 261 influenza A/H3N2 viruses characterized, 258 (98.7%) were antigenically related to A/Perth/16/2009, which is the influenza A/H3N2 component recommended for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. Three viruses (1.1%) tested showed reduced titer with antiserum produced against A/Perth/16/2009. Of the 138 pandemic H1N1 2009 viruses characterized, 137 (99.3%) were antigenically related to the pandemic vaccine virus A/California/7/2009, which is the recommended H1N1 component for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. One virus (0.7%) tested showed reduced titer with antiserum produced against A/California/7/2009. Of the 476 influenza B viruses characterized, 456 (95.8%) were antigenically related to B/Brisbane/60/08 (Victoria lineage), which is the recommended influenza B component for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. Four of the 456 viruses tested showed reduced titer with antisera produced against B/Brisbane/60/08. Twenty (4.2%) influenza B viruses were characterized as B/Wisconsin/01/2010-like, which belongs to the Yamagata lineage. B/Wisconsin/01/2010-like viruses are antigenically and genetically different from the previous Yamagata lineage vaccine strain B/Florida/04/2006.
      Antiviral Resistance
      Since the beginning of the 2010-2011 season, NML has tested 616 influenza A isolates (460 A/H3N2 and 156 pandemic H1N1 2009) for amantadine resistance and found that 459 influenza A/H3N2 were resistant and one was sensitive. All 156 influenza A/H1N1 viruses were resistant to amantadine. Of 763 influenza viruses (233 A/H3N2, 140 pandemic H1N1 2009, and 390 influenza B) tested for resistance to oseltamivir, 232 A/H3N2 viruses were sensitive and one was resistant with E119V mutation. The resistant case was associated with oseltamivir prophylaxis/treatment. Of the 140 pandemic H1N1 2009 isolates tested for oseltamivir resistance, 139 were sensitive and one was resistant with the H275Y mutation. The resistant case was associated with oseltamivir treatment. All 390 B viruses were sensitive to oseltamivir. Of 755 influenza viruses (230 A/H3N2, 136 pandemic H1N1 2009, and 389 influenza B) tested for zanamivir resistance all isolates were found to be sensitive.
      Severe Illness Surveillance

      Paediatric Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
      In week 17, 9 new laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated paediatric (16 years of age and under) hospitalizations were reported through the Immunization Monitoring Program Active (IMPACT) network: 1 from AB, 2 from ON, 5 from QC, and 1 from NL. This number is decreased compared to the previous week (week 16) in which 11 paediatric hospitalizations were reported (note that numbers may fluctuate because of the delays in reporting). Five paediatric deaths have been reported via IMPACT this season all with underlying comorbidities.
      Since the beginning of the season, 651 hospitalizations with laboratory-confirmed influenza have been reported: 102 (15.7%) as influenza A/H3N2, 22 (3.4%) pandemic H1N1 2009, 328 (50.4%) as unsubytped influenza A, and 199 (30.6%) influenza B. The distribution of cases to date by age group was as follows: 16.7% among 0-5 month olds; 27.8% among 6-23 month olds; 28.7% among the 2-4 year-olds; 15.8% among 5-9 year-olds; and 10.9% among children 10-16 years old.
      Adult Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
      During week 17, 3 new hospitalizations with laboratory-confirmed influenza among adults (16 years of age and older) were reported through the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP), all with influenza B. This number is decreased compared to the 5 cases reported in week 16 (note that numbers may fluctuate because of the delays in reporting). Since the beginning of the season, 964 hospitalized cases have been reported: 202 (21.0%) A/H3N2, 48 (5.0%) pandemic H1N1 2009, 643 (66.7%) influenza A unsubtyped, and 71 (7.4%) influenza B, from all reporting provinces. To date, 649 of the 964 (67.3%) cases were aged 65 years or older and 436 (45.2%) were males.

      Aggregate Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
      Nine provinces and territories (excluding BC, QC, NB and NU) currently conduct severe outcomes surveillance and report weekly numbers of hospitalizations, ICU admissions and deaths with laboratory-confirmed influenza. In week 17, no deaths with influenza were reported. Among the 221 fatal cases reported since the beginning of the influenza season, influenza A/H3N2 was identified in 61.1% (135/221), unsubtyped influenza A in 28.5% (63/221), pandemic H1N1 2009 in 5.9% (13/221), and influenza B in 4.5% (10/221). Eighty percent (176/221) of these fatal cases were among persons 65 years of age or older, and another 11% (24/221) were between the ages of 45 and 64 years old, in keeping with the age-groups usually affected by A/H3N2. (Note that numbers may fluctuate because of the delays in reporting).

      .../
      http://origin.phac-aspc.gc.ca/fluwat.../index-eng.php
      "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
      -Nelson Mandela

      Comment


      • #63
        Re: Canada FluWatch Weekly Reports 2010-2011 Season Week 18 - 221 deaths total (excluding BC, QC, NB and NU)

        <TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR><TD>May 1 to 7, 2011 (Week 18)

        </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


        Posted 2011-05-13

        Overall Influenza Summary
        • In week 18, influenza activity in Canada continues to decline with most of the country reporting sporadic or no activity. Localized activity persists in a few regions of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland.
        • Both influenza A and B detections continue to decrease. The proportion of positive tests for parainfluenza viruses continues to increase in many regions of the country.
        • The ILI consultation rate, as well as paediatric and adult hospitalizations with influenza continue on a downward trend with few reports in week 18.

        Influenza Activity and Outbreaks

        In week 18, 4 regions reported localized activity: NS(2) and NL(2); 27 regions reported sporadic activity (in all provinces and territories except NS, PE and YT) and 25 regions presented no activity (see Activity level Map). Compared to the previous week (week 17), 3 regions reported an increased level of influenza activity, 15 regions reported decreased activity, and 25 regions maintained a stable level of influenza activity (sporadic or higher). Seven new outbreaks were reported: 4 influenza outbreaks in long-term care facilities (LTCF) in NL(2) and NS(2); 2 ILI outbreaks in schools in NB(1) and NL(1); and one outbreak of ILI in another facility in NL.

        Map of overall Influenza activity level by province and territory, Canada, Week 18





        No Data

        No Activity

        Sporadic Activity

        Localized Activity

        Widespread Activity



        Note: Influenza activity levels, as represented on this map, are assigned and reported by Provincial and Territorial Ministries of Health, based on laboratory confirmations, sentinel ILI rates (see graphs and tables) and reported outbreaks. Please refer to detailed definitions on the last page. For areas where no data is reported, late reports from these provinces and territories will appear on the FluWatch website.
        Text Equivalent

        Number of influenza surveillance regions<SUP title="sub-regions within the province or territory as defined by the provincial/territorial epidemiologist. Graph may change as late returns come in"></SUP> reporting widespread or localized influenza activity, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011 (N=56)


        sub-regions within the province or territory as defined by the provincial/territorial epidemiologist. Graph may change as late returns come in.
        Text Equivalent


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        Overall Number of Influenza Outbreaks, Canada, by Report Week, 2010-2011


        Note that this was the first year that all the provinces and territories were reporting on influenza outbreaks in schools (greater than 10% absenteeism on any day most likely due to ILI) which has increased considerably the total number of outbreaks reported compared to previous years.
        Text Equivalent
        ILI consultation rate
        During week 18, the national ILI consultation rate was 15.1 consultations per 1,000 patient visits, which is increased compared to the previous week but is within the expected rate for this time of year (see ILI graph). Children under 5 years of age had the highest consultation rates (81.8 per 1,000 consultations), followed by children 5-19 years of age (23.9 per 1,000 consultations) in week 18.
        Influenza-like illness (ILI) consultation rates, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011 compared to 1996/97 through to 2008/09 seasons


        Note: No data available for mean rate in previous years for weeks 19 to 39 (1996-1997 through 2002-2003 seasons). Delays in the reporting of data may cause data to change retrospectively.
        Text Equivalent
        Laboratory Surveillance Summary
        The overall proportion of tests that were positive for influenza during week 18 was 5.2% (1.5% influenza A, 3.7% influenza B), which is decreased compared to week 17 (7.1%). The proportion of positive tests peaked in week 52 (see Influenza tests graph). Since the beginning of the season, 85.6% (16,433/19,193) of influenza virus detections have been influenza A viruses, of which 84.7% (5,481/6,474) of subtyped specimens have been A/H3N2. Detections of influenza B have been increasing steadily since week 03 and appear to have reached a peak in week 15. Among influenza A detections in week 18, 14 (38.9%) specimens were reported as influenza A/H3N2, 3 (8.3%) as pandemic H1N1 2009, and 19 (52.8%) as un-subtyped influenza A. Through detailed case-based laboratory reporting where age data is provided, since August 29, 2010, 51.0% (2,056/4,034) of cases with A/H3N2 were aged 65 years or older. In contrast, the majority of cases with pandemic H1N1 2009 (94.4%, 746/790) and influenza B (90.3%, 1,313/1,454) were under 65 years of age (see Tests detailed table). The proportion of positive tests for respiratory syncytial virus detections (RSV) continues to decrease (peak in week 07). Since week 11, the proportion of positive tests for parainfluenza viruses has been increasing and reaching 6.9% in week 18, predominantly due to parainfluenza type 3 (52.9%) and type 1 (35.5%). (See Respiratory viruses graph).
        Weekly & Cumulative numbers of positive influenza specimens by Provincial Laboratories, Canada, 2010-2011

        <TABLE class=widthFull border=1 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2><TFOOT><TR><TD class=fontSize85 colSpan=13>* Unsubtyped: The specimen was typed as influenza A, but no test for subtyping was performed. Specimens from NT, YT, and NU are sent to reference laboratories in other provinces. Note: Cumulative data includes updates to previous weeks; due to reporting delays, the sum of weekly report totals do not add up to cumulative totals.
        </TD></TR></TFOOT><TBODY><TR class=alignCenter><TH class=bg-colour-blue rowSpan=3 scope=col>Reporting provinces</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=6 scope=colgroup>Weekly (May 1 to May 7, 2011)</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=6 scope=colgroup>Cumulative (August 29, 2010 to May 7, 2011)</TH></TR><TR class=alignCenter><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" scope=col>B</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=col>B</TH></TR><TR class=alignCenter><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H1)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H3)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Pand H1N1</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue noWrap" scope=col>A (Un S)*</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H1)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H3)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Pand H1N1</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue noWrap" scope=col>A (Un S)*</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Total</TH></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>BC</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>477</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>200</TD><TD class=alignCenter>164</TD><TD class=alignCenter>113</TD><TD class=alignCenter>179</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>AB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>9</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1063</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>751</TD><TD class=alignCenter>276</TD><TD class=alignCenter>36</TD><TD class=alignCenter>725</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>SK</TH><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>8</TD><TD class=alignCenter>316</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>212</TD><TD class=alignCenter>30</TD><TD class=alignCenter>74</TD><TD class=alignCenter>169</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>MB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>515</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>56</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>457</TD><TD class=alignCenter>13</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>ON</TH><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>17</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6882</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2437</TD><TD class=alignCenter>274</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4171</TD><TD class=alignCenter>822</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>QC</TH><TD class=alignCenter>8</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>8</TD><TD class=alignCenter>45</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5645</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>877</TD><TD class=alignCenter>38</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4730</TD><TD class=alignCenter>708</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>10</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>7</TD><TD class=alignCenter>959</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>669</TD><TD class=alignCenter>176</TD><TD class=alignCenter>114</TD><TD class=alignCenter>100</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NS</TH><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>271</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>80</TD><TD class=alignCenter>11</TD><TD class=alignCenter>180</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>PE</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>97</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>79</TD><TD class=alignCenter>16</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NL</TH><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4</TD><TD class=alignCenter>208</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>120</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>82</TD><TD class=alignCenter>33</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>Canada</TH><TD class=alignCenter>36</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>14</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>19</TD><TD class=alignCenter>91</TD><TD class=alignCenter>16433</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5481</TD><TD class=alignCenter>993</TD><TD class=alignCenter>9959</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2760</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

        Weekly & Cumulative numbers of positive influenza specimens by age groups reported through case-based laboratory reporting, Canada, 2010-2011*

        <TABLE class=widthFull border=1 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2><TFOOT><TR><TD class=fontSize85 colSpan=11>* Please note that this table reflects the number of specimens for which demographic information was reported. These represent a subset of all positive influenza cases reported. Five provinces have reported detailed case-by-case data since the beginning of the season (BC, AB, SK, MB and ON). Delays in the reporting of data may cause data to change retrospectively.
        </TD></TR></TFOOT><TBODY><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH rowSpan=3 scope=col>Age groups</TH><TH colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Weekly
        (May 1 to May 7, 2011)</TH><TH colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Cumulative
        (Aug. 29, 2010 to May 7, 2011)
        </TH></TR><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH colSpan=4 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH>B</TH><TH colSpan=4 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH>B</TH></TR><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH scope=col>A Total</TH><TH scope=col>Pandemic H1N1</TH><TH scope=col>A/H3N2</TH><TH scope=col>A unsubtyped</TH><TH scope=col>Total</TH><TH scope=col>A Total</TH><TH scope=col>Pandemic H1N1</TH><TH scope=col>A/H3N2</TH><TH scope=col>A unsubtyped</TH><TH scope=col>Total</TH></TR><TR><TD><5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>927</TD><TD class=alignCenter>128</TD><TD class=alignCenter>728</TD><TD class=alignCenter>71</TD><TD class=alignCenter>392</TD></TR><TR><TD>5-19</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>441</TD><TD class=alignCenter>103</TD><TD class=alignCenter>294</TD><TD class=alignCenter>44</TD><TD class=alignCenter>525</TD></TR><TR><TD>20-44</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>977</TD><TD class=alignCenter>328</TD><TD class=alignCenter>520</TD><TD class=alignCenter>129</TD><TD class=alignCenter>286</TD></TR><TR><TD>45-64</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>713</TD><TD class=alignCenter>187</TD><TD class=alignCenter>436</TD><TD class=alignCenter>90</TD><TD class=alignCenter>110</TD></TR><TR><TD>65+</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2369</TD><TD class=alignCenter>44</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2056</TD><TD class=alignCenter>269</TD><TD class=alignCenter>141</TD></TR><TR><TD>Unknown</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>231</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>224</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD></TR><TR><TD>Total</TD><TD class=alignCenter>9</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4</TD><TD class=alignCenter>9</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5658</TD><TD class=alignCenter>793</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4258</TD><TD class=alignCenter>607</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1455</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


        Top of Page

        Influenza tests reported and percentage of tests positive, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011


        Text Equivalent

        Percent positive influenza tests, compared to other respiratory viruses, Canada, by reporting week, 2010-2011


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        Canadian situation

        Antigenic Characterization
        Between September 1 and May 12, 2011, the National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) has antigenically characterized 904 influenza viruses that were received from provincial laboratories: 267 A/H3N2, 140 pandemic H1N1 2009 and 497 B viruses. Of the 267 influenza A/H3N2 viruses characterized, 264 (98.9%) were antigenically related to A/Perth/16/2009, which is the influenza A/H3N2 component recommended for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. Three viruses (1.1%) tested showed reduced titer with antiserum produced against A/Perth/16/2009. Of the 140 pandemic H1N1 2009 viruses characterized, 138 (99.6%) were antigenically related to the pandemic vaccine virus A/California/7/2009, which is the recommended H1N1 component for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. Two viruses (1.4%) tested showed reduced titer with antiserum produced against A/California/7/2009. Of the 497 influenza B viruses characterized, 475 (95.6%) were antigenically related to B/Brisbane/60/08 (Victoria lineage), which is the recommended influenza B component for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. Four of the 475 viruses tested showed reduced titer with antisera produced against B/Brisbane/60/08. Twenty-two (4.4%) influenza B viruses were characterized as B/Wisconsin/01/2010-like, which belongs to the Yamagata lineage. B/Wisconsin/01/2010-like viruses are antigenically and genetically different from the previous Yamagata lineage vaccine strain B/Florida/04/2006.
        Antiviral Resistance
        Since the beginning of the 2010-2011 season, NML has tested 617 influenza A isolates (461 A/H3N2 and 156 pandemic H1N1 2009) for amantadine resistance and found that 460 influenza A/H3N2 were resistant and one was sensitive. All 156 influenza A/H1N1 viruses were resistant to amantadine. Of 857 influenza viruses (246 A/H3N2, 143 pandemic H1N1 2009, and 468 influenza B) tested for resistance to oseltamivir, 245 A/H3N2 viruses were sensitive and one was resistant with E119V mutation. The resistant case was associated with oseltamivir prophylaxis/treatment. Of the 143 pandemic H1N1 2009 isolates tested for oseltamivir resistance, 142 were sensitive and one was resistant with the H275Y mutation. The resistant case was associated with oseltamivir treatment. All 468 B viruses were sensitive to oseltamivir. Of 847 influenza viruses (242 A/H3N2, 138 pandemic H1N1 2009, and 467 influenza B) tested for zanamivir resistance all isolates were found to be sensitive.
        Severe Illness Surveillance

        Paediatric Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
        In week 18, 2 new laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated paediatric (16 years of age and under) hospitalizations were reported through the Immunization Monitoring Program Active (IMPACT) network: both with influenza B from SK. This number is decreased compared to the previous week (week 17) in which 12 paediatric hospitalizations were reported (note that numbers may fluctuate because of the delays in reporting). In week 17 a paediatric death associated with influenza B in a child between 2 and 4 years of age was reported in Alberta. The child had underlying co-morbidities. This is the sixth pediatric death this season. The five previous deaths were: 3 children between 6 and 23 months old, two with pandemic H1N1 2009 and one with influenza B; one child between 2 and 4 years old with influenza B; and one child between 10 and 16 years old with influenza A/H3. All cases had underlying comorbidities. None were vaccinated.
        Since the beginning of the season, 656 hospitalizations with laboratory-confirmed influenza have been reported: 103 (15.7%) as influenza A/H3N2, 22 (3.4%) pandemic H1N1 2009, 327 (49.8%) as un-subtyped influenza A, and 204 (31.1%) influenza B. The distribution of cases to date by age group was as follows: 16.6% among 0-5 month olds; 27.6% among 6-23 month olds; 28.7% among the 2-4 year-olds; 16.2% among 5-9 year-olds; and 11.0% among children 10-16 years old.
        Adult Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
        During week 18, 2 new hospitalizations with laboratory-confirmed influenza among adults (16 years of age and older) were reported through the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP), both with influenza B. This number is similar to the 3 cases reported in week 17 (note that numbers may fluctuate because of the delays in reporting). Since the beginning of the season, 966 hospitalized cases have been reported: 202 (20.9%) A/H3N2, 48 (5.0%) pandemic H1N1 2009, 643 (66.6%) influenza A unsubtyped, and 73 (7.6%) influenza B, from all reporting provinces. To date, 650 of the 966 (67.3%) cases were aged 65 years or older and 436 (45.1%) were males.

        Aggregate Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths

        Nine provinces and territories (excluding BC, QC, NB and NU) currently conduct severe outcomes surveillance and report weekly numbers of hospitalizations, ICU admissions and deaths with laboratory-confirmed influenza. In week 18, no deaths with influenza were reported. Among the 221 fatal cases reported since the beginning of the influenza season, influenza A/H3N2 was identified in 61.1% (135/221), unsubtyped influenza A in 28.5% (63/221), pandemic H1N1 2009 in 5.9% (13/221), and influenza B in 4.5% (10/221). Eighty percent (176/221) of these fatal cases were among persons 65 years of age or older, and another 11% (24/221) were between the ages of 45 and 64 years old, in keeping with the age-groups usually affected by A/H3N2. (Note that numbers may fluctuate because of the delays in reporting).

        .../
        http://origin.phac-aspc.gc.ca/fluwat.../index-eng.php
        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
        -Nelson Mandela

        Comment


        • #64
          Re: Canada FluWatch Weekly Reports 2010-2011 Season Week 19 - 224 deaths total (excluding BC, QC, NB and NU)

          <TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR><TD>May 8 to 14, 2011 (Week 19)


          </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
          </B>

          Posted 2011-05-20


          Overall Influenza Summary
          • In week 19, influenza activity in Canada continues to decline with most of the country reporting sporadic or no activity. Localized activity persists in a few regions of Quebec and Newfoundland.
          • Both influenza A and B detections continue to decrease. The proportion of positive tests for parainfluenza viruses continues to increase in many regions of the country.
          • The ILI consultation rate and adult hospitalizations with influenza continue on a downward trend. Paediatric hospitalizations with influenza increased slightly compared to the previous week, although few cases were reported.
          Influenza Activity and Outbreaks

          In week 19, 3 regions reported localized activity: NL(2) and QC(1); 21 regions reported sporadic activity; and 32 regions presented no activity (see Activity level Map). Compared to the previous week (week 18), 4 regions reported an increased level of influenza activity, 10 regions reported decreased activity, and 20 regions maintained a stable level of influenza activity (sporadic or higher). Eight new outbreaks were reported: 1 outbreak of influenza A (unsubtyped) in a long-term care facility (LTCF) in QC; 1 influenza outbreak in a LTCF in NB; 5 ILI outbreaks in schools in NB(1), NS(2) and NL(2); and one outbreak of ILI in another facility in NL.

          Map of overall Influenza activity level by province and territory, Canada, Week 19





          No Data

          No Activity

          Sporadic Activity

          Localized Activity

          Widespread Activity



          Note: Influenza activity levels, as represented on this map, are assigned and reported by Provincial and Territorial Ministries of Health, based on laboratory confirmations, sentinel ILI rates (see graphs and tables) and reported outbreaks. Please refer to detailed definitions on the last page. For areas where no data is reported, late reports from these provinces and territories will appear on the FluWatch website.
          Text Equivalent

          Number of influenza surveillance regions<SUP title="sub-regions within the province or territory as defined by the provincial/territorial epidemiologist. Graph may change as late returns come in"></SUP> reporting widespread or localized influenza activity, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011 (N=56)


          sub-regions within the province or territory as defined by the provincial/territorial epidemiologist. Graph may change as late returns come in.
          Text Equivalent


          Top of Page

          Overall Number of Influenza Outbreaks, Canada, by Report Week, 2010-2011


          Note that this was the first year that all the provinces and territories were reporting on influenza outbreaks in schools (greater than 10% absenteeism on any day most likely due to ILI) which has increased considerably the total number of outbreaks reported compared to previous years.
          Text Equivalent
          ILI consultation rate
          During week 19, the national ILI consultation rate was 13.2 consultations per 1,000 patient visits, which is decreased compared to the previous week and still within the expected rate for this time of year (see ILI graph). Children under 5 years of age had the highest consultation rates (37.8 per 1,000 consultations), followed by children 5-19 years of age (17.3 per 1,000 consultations) in week 19.
          Influenza-like illness (ILI) consultation rates, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011 compared to 1996/97 through to 2008/09 seasons


          Note: No data available for mean rate in previous years for weeks 19 to 39 (1996-1997 through 2002-2003 seasons). Delays in the reporting of data may cause data to change retrospectively.
          Text Equivalent
          Laboratory Surveillance Summary
          The overall proportion of tests that were positive for influenza during week 19 was 4.0% (1.3% influenza A, 2.7% influenza B), which is decreased compared to week 18 (5.2%). The proportion of positive tests peaked in week 52 (see Influenza tests graph). Since the beginning of the season, 85.4% (16,466/19,286) of influenza virus detections have been influenza A viruses, of which 84.6% (5,487/6,483) of subtyped specimens have been A/H3N2. Detections of influenza B have been increasing steadily since week 03 and appear to have reached a peak in week 15. Through detailed case-based laboratory reporting where age data is provided, since August 29, 2010, 50.7% (2,056/4,052) of cases with A/H3N2 were aged 65 years or older. In contrast, the majority of cases with pandemic H1N1 2009 (94.5%, 750/794) and influenza B (90.3%, 1,345/1,489) were under 65 years of age (see Tests detailed table). The proportion of positive tests for respiratory syncytial virus detections (RSV) continues to decrease (peak in week 07). Since week 11, the proportion of positive tests for parainfluenza viruses has been increasing and reaching 7.2% in week 19 (see Respiratory viruses graph).
          Weekly & Cumulative numbers of positive influenza specimens by Provincial Laboratories, Canada, 2010-2011

          <TABLE class=widthFull border=1 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2><TFOOT><TR><TD class=fontSize85 colSpan=13>* Unsubtyped: The specimen was typed as influenza A, but no test for subtyping was performed. Specimens from NT, YT, and NU are sent to reference laboratories in other provinces. Note: Cumulative data includes updates to previous weeks; due to reporting delays, the sum of weekly report totals do not add up to cumulative totals.

          </TD></TR></TFOOT><TBODY><TR class=alignCenter><TH class=bg-colour-blue rowSpan=3 scope=col>Reporting provinces</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=6 scope=colgroup>Weekly (May 8 to May 14, 2011)</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=6 scope=colgroup>Cumulative (August 29, 2010 to May 14, 2011)</TH></TR><TR class=alignCenter><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" scope=col>B</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=col>B</TH></TR><TR class=alignCenter><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H1)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H3)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Pand H1N1</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue noWrap" scope=col>A (Un S)*</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H1)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H3)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Pand H1N1</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue noWrap" scope=col>A (Un S)*</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Total</TH></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>BC</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>477</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>200</TD><TD class=alignCenter>164</TD><TD class=alignCenter>113</TD><TD class=alignCenter>179</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>AB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>8</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1073</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>757</TD><TD class=alignCenter>279</TD><TD class=alignCenter>37</TD><TD class=alignCenter>734</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>SK</TH><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>318</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>212</TD><TD class=alignCenter>30</TD><TD class=alignCenter>76</TD><TD class=alignCenter>174</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>MB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>515</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>56</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>457</TD><TD class=alignCenter>14</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>ON</TH><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>11</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6883</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2437</TD><TD class=alignCenter>274</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4172</TD><TD class=alignCenter>833</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>QC</TH><TD class=alignCenter>15</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>15</TD><TD class=alignCenter>27</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5660</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>877</TD><TD class=alignCenter>38</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4745</TD><TD class=alignCenter>735</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>959</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>669</TD><TD class=alignCenter>176</TD><TD class=alignCenter>114</TD><TD class=alignCenter>102</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NS</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>271</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>80</TD><TD class=alignCenter>11</TD><TD class=alignCenter>180</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>PE</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>97</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>79</TD><TD class=alignCenter>16</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NL</TH><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>213</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>120</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>87</TD><TD class=alignCenter>38</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>Canada</TH><TD class=alignCenter>28</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>24</TD><TD class=alignCenter>59</TD><TD class=alignCenter>16466</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5487</TD><TD class=alignCenter>996</TD><TD class=alignCenter>9983</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2820</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

          Weekly & Cumulative numbers of positive influenza specimens by age groups reported through case-based laboratory reporting, Canada, 2010-2011*

          <TABLE class=widthFull border=1 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2><TFOOT><TR><TD class=fontSize85 colSpan=11>* Please note that this table reflects the number of specimens for which demographic information was reported. These represent a subset of all positive influenza cases reported. Five provinces have reported detailed case-by-case data since the beginning of the season (BC, AB, SK, MB and ON). Delays in the reporting of data may cause data to change retrospectively.

          </TD></TR></TFOOT><TBODY><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH rowSpan=3 scope=col>Age groups</TH><TH colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Weekly
          (May 8 to May 14, 2011)
          </TH><TH colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Cumulative
          (Aug. 29, 2010 to May 14, 2011)

          </TH></TR><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH colSpan=4 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH>B</TH><TH colSpan=4 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH>B</TH></TR><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH scope=col>A Total</TH><TH scope=col>Pandemic H1N1</TH><TH scope=col>A/H3N2</TH><TH scope=col>A unsubtyped</TH><TH scope=col>Total</TH><TH scope=col>A Total</TH><TH scope=col>Pandemic H1N1</TH><TH scope=col>A/H3N2</TH><TH scope=col>A unsubtyped</TH><TH scope=col>Total</TH></TR><TR><TD><5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1011</TD><TD class=alignCenter>129</TD><TD class=alignCenter>736</TD><TD class=alignCenter>146</TD><TD class=alignCenter>409</TD></TR><TR><TD>5-19</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>515</TD><TD class=alignCenter>103</TD><TD class=alignCenter>295</TD><TD class=alignCenter>117</TD><TD class=alignCenter>532</TD></TR><TR><TD>20-44</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1080</TD><TD class=alignCenter>331</TD><TD class=alignCenter>529</TD><TD class=alignCenter>220</TD><TD class=alignCenter>290</TD></TR><TR><TD>45-64</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>791</TD><TD class=alignCenter>187</TD><TD class=alignCenter>436</TD><TD class=alignCenter>168</TD><TD class=alignCenter>114</TD></TR><TR><TD>65+</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2505</TD><TD class=alignCenter>44</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2056</TD><TD class=alignCenter>405</TD><TD class=alignCenter>144</TD></TR><TR><TD>Unknown</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>231</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>224</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD></TR><TR><TD>Total</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>8</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6133</TD><TD class=alignCenter>797</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4276</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1060</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1490</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


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          Influenza tests reported and percentage of tests positive, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011


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          Percent positive influenza tests, compared to other respiratory viruses, Canada, by reporting week, 2010-2011


          Text Equivalent
          Antigenic Characterization
          Between September 1 and May 19, 2011, the National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) has antigenically characterized 920 influenza viruses that were received from provincial laboratories: 269 A/H3N2, 141 pandemic H1N1 2009 and 510 B viruses. Of the 269 influenza A/H3N2 viruses characterized, 266 (98.9%) were antigenically related to A/Perth/16/2009, which is the influenza A/H3N2 component recommended for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. Three viruses (1.1%) tested showed reduced titer with antiserum produced against A/Perth/16/2009. Of the 141 pandemic H1N1 2009 viruses characterized, 139 (98.6%) were antigenically related to the pandemic vaccine virus A/California/7/2009, which is the recommended H1N1 component for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. Two viruses (1.4%) tested showed reduced titer with antiserum produced against A/California/7/2009. Of the 510 influenza B viruses characterized, 488 (95.7%) were antigenically related to B/Brisbane/60/08 (Victoria lineage), which is the recommended influenza B component for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. Four of the 488 viruses tested showed reduced titer with antisera produced against B/Brisbane/60/08. Twenty-two (4.3%) influenza B viruses were characterized as B/Wisconsin/01/2010-like, which belongs to the Yamagata lineage. B/Wisconsin/01/2010-like viruses are antigenically and genetically different from the previous Yamagata lineage vaccine strain B/Florida/04/2006.
          Antiviral Resistance
          Since the beginning of the 2010-2011 season, NML has tested 628 influenza A isolates (470 A/H3N2 and 158 pandemic H1N1 2009) for amantadine resistance and found that 469 influenza A/H3N2 were resistant and one was sensitive. All 158 influenza A/H1N1 viruses were resistant to amantadine. Of 893 influenza viruses (246 A/H3N2, 145 pandemic H1N1 2009, and 502 influenza B) tested for resistance to oseltamivir, 245 A/H3N2 viruses were sensitive and one was resistant with the E119V mutation. The resistant case was associated with oseltamivir prophylaxis/treatment. Of the 145 pandemic H1N1 2009 isolates tested for oseltamivir resistance, 144 were sensitive and one was resistant with the H275Y mutation. The resistant case was associated with oseltamivir treatment. Of the 502 B virus isolates tested, 501 were sensitive to oseltamivir and one was resistant with the D198N mutation. Of 884 influenza viruses (242 A/H3N2, 142 pandemic H1N1 2009, and 500 influenza B) tested for zanamivir resistance all isolates were found to be sensitive.
          Severe Illness Surveillance

          Note that all numbers are preliminary and numbers may fluctuate because of delays in reporting.
          Paediatric Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
          In week 19, 5 new laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated paediatric (16 years of age and under) hospitalizations were reported through the Immunization Monitoring Program Active (IMPACT) network: 4 with influenza B, one with influenza A. This number is increased compared to the previous week (week 18) in which 2 paediatric hospitalizations were reported. Influenza A was associated with the majority of hospitalizations earlier in the season (weeks 47 to 09). Since week 10, however, influenza B accounted for more cases than influenza A each week. Six paediatric deaths have been reported via IMPACT this season: 3 children between 6 and 23 months old, two with pandemic H1N1 2009 and one with influenza B; two children between 2 and 4 years old, both with influenza B; and one child between 10 and 16 years old with influenza A/H3. All cases had underlying comorbidities.
          Since the beginning of the season, 660 hospitalizations with laboratory-confirmed influenza have been reported: 103 (15.6%) as influenza A/H3N2, 23 (3.5%) pandemic H1N1 2009, 326 (49.4%) as un-subtyped influenza A, and 208 (31.5%) influenza B. The distribution of cases to date by age group was as follows: 16.7% among 0-5 month olds; 27.7% among 6-23 month olds; 28.6% among the 2-4 year-olds; 16.4% among 5-9 year-olds; and 10.6% among children 10-16 years old.
          Adult Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
          During week 19, 2 new hospitalizations with laboratory-confirmed influenza among adults (16 years of age and older) were reported through the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP), both with influenza B, similar to the previous week. Since the beginning of the season, 968 hospitalized cases have been reported: 202 (20.9%) A/H3N2, 48 (5.0%) pandemic H1N1 2009, 643 (66.4%) influenza A unsubtyped, and 75 (7.7%) influenza B, from all reporting provinces. To date, 651 of the 968 (67.3%) cases were aged 65 years or older and 437 (45.1%) were males.

          Aggregate Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
          Nine provinces and territories (excluding BC, QC, NB and NU) currently conduct severe outcomes surveillance and report weekly numbers of hospitalizations, ICU admissions and deaths with laboratory-confirmed influenza. In week 19, one death with pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza was reported from Alberta. Among the 224 fatal cases reported since the beginning of the influenza season, influenza A/H3N2 was identified in 60.7% (136/224), unsubtyped influenza A in 28.1% (63/224), pandemic H1N1 2009 in 6.7% (15/224), and influenza B in 4.5% (10/224). Seventy-nine percent (177/224) of these fatal cases were among persons 65 years of age or older, and another 11% (25/224) were between the ages of 45 and 64 years old, in keeping with the age-groups usually affected by A/H3N2.

          .../
          http://origin.phac-aspc.gc.ca/fluwat.../index-eng.php
          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
          -Nelson Mandela

          Comment


          • #65
            Re: Canada FluWatch Weekly Reports 2010-2011 Season Week 20 - 224 deaths total (excluding BC, QC, NB and NU)

            <TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR><TD>May 15 to 21, 2011 (Week 20)

            </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


            Posted 2011-05-27

            Overall Influenza Summary
            • The 2010-11 influenza season in Canada is drawing to a close, with most regions of the country reporting sporadic or no activity. The ILI consultation rate, number of outbreaks, paediatric and adult hospitalizations all continue to decrease.
            • Laboratory detections of both influenza A and B continue to decrease, and in week 20 the proportion of positive tests for parainfluenza viruses declined.
            Note: This is the final weekly report for the 2010-11 influenza season. Bi-weekly reports will commence on June 10th (for weeks 21 and 22). However, laboratory detections reported through the RVDSS and influenza activity level maps will be updated weekly on the FluWatch website.
            Influenza Activity and Outbreaks

            In week 20, 4 regions reported localized activity: AB(1), NS(2) and NL(1); 21 regions reported sporadic activity; and 31 regions presented no activity (see Activity level Map). Three new outbreaks were reported in wk 20, one outbreak of influenza in a long-term care facility (LTCF) in Alberta, and 2 ILI outbreaks in communities in Nova Scotia.

            Map of overall Influenza activity level by province and territory, Canada, Week 20





            No Data

            No Activity

            Sporadic Activity

            Localized Activity

            Widespread Activity



            Note: Influenza activity levels, as represented on this map, are assigned and reported by Provincial and Territorial Ministries of Health, based on laboratory confirmations, sentinel ILI rates (see graphs and tables) and reported outbreaks. Please refer to detailed definitions on the last page. For areas where no data is reported, late reports from these provinces and territories will appear on the FluWatch website.
            Text Equivalent

            Number of influenza surveillance regions<SUP title="sub-regions within the province or territory as defined by the provincial/territorial epidemiologist. Graph may change as late returns come in"></SUP> reporting widespread or localized influenza activity, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011 (N=56)


            sub-regions within the province or territory as defined by the provincial/territorial epidemiologist. Graph may change as late returns come in.
            Text Equivalent


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            Overall Number of Influenza Outbreaks, Canada, by Report Week, 2010-2011


            Note that this was the first year that all the provinces and territories were reporting on influenza outbreaks in schools (greater than 10% absenteeism on any day most likely due to ILI) which has increased considerably the total number of outbreaks reported compared to previous years.
            Text Equivalent
            ILI consultation rate
            During week 20, the national ILI consultation rate was 10.0 consultations per 1,000 patient visits, which is decreased compared to the previous week and within the expected rate for this time of year (see ILI graph). Children 5-19 years of age had the highest consultation rates (21.6 per 1,000 consultations) in week 20.
            Influenza-like illness (ILI) consultation rates, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011 compared to 1996/97 through to 2008/09 seasons


            Note: No data available for mean rate in previous years for weeks 19 to 39 (1996-1997 through 2002-2003 seasons). Delays in the reporting of data may cause data to change retrospectively.
            Text Equivalent
            Laboratory Surveillance Summary
            The overall proportion of tests that were positive for influenza during week 20 was 2.9% (1.0% influenza A, 1.9% influenza B), which is decreased compared to week 19 (3.8%). The proportion of positive tests peaked in week 52 (see Influenza tests graph). Since the beginning of the season, 85.5% (16,847/19,706) of influenza virus detections have been influenza A viruses, of which 84.8% (5,578/6,578) of subtyped specimens have been A/H3N2. Detections of influenza B have been increasing steadily since week 03 and peaked in week 15. Through detailed case-based laboratory reporting where age data is provided, since August 29, 2010, 50.7% (2,059/4,059) of cases with A/H3N2 were aged 65 years or older. In contrast, the majority of cases with pandemic H1N1 2009 (94.5%, 751/795) and influenza B (90.3%, 1,348/1,492) were under 65 years of age (see Tests detailed table). Following an increasing proportion of positive tests for parainfluenza viruses since week 11, the proportion decreased in week 20 (see Respiratory viruses graph).
            Weekly & Cumulative numbers of positive influenza specimens by Provincial Laboratories, Canada, 2010-2011

            <TABLE class=widthFull border=1 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2><TFOOT><TR><TD class=fontSize85 colSpan=13>* Unsubtyped: The specimen was typed as influenza A, but no test for subtyping was performed. Specimens from NT, YT, and NU are sent to reference laboratories in other provinces. Note: Cumulative data includes updates to previous weeks; due to reporting delays, the sum of weekly report totals do not add up to cumulative totals.
            </TD></TR></TFOOT><TBODY><TR class=alignCenter><TH class=bg-colour-blue rowSpan=3 scope=col>Reporting provinces</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=6 scope=colgroup>Weekly (May 15 to May 21, 2011)</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=6 scope=colgroup>Cumulative (August 29, 2010 to May 21, 2011)</TH></TR><TR class=alignCenter><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" scope=col>B</TH><TH class="bg-colour-blue fontSize85" colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=col>B</TH></TR><TR class=alignCenter><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H1)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H3)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Pand H1N1</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue noWrap" scope=col>A (Un S)*</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A Total</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H1)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>A(H3)</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Pand H1N1</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue noWrap" scope=col>A (Un S)*</TH><TH class="fontSize85 bg-colour-blue" scope=col>Total</TH></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>BC</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>477</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>200</TD><TD class=alignCenter>164</TD><TD class=alignCenter>113</TD><TD class=alignCenter>179</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>AB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>8</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>7</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1081</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>765</TD><TD class=alignCenter>279</TD><TD class=alignCenter>37</TD><TD class=alignCenter>736</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>SK</TH><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>320</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>213</TD><TD class=alignCenter>30</TD><TD class=alignCenter>77</TD><TD class=alignCenter>175</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>MB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>515</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>56</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>457</TD><TD class=alignCenter>15</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>ON</TH><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>8</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6884</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2437</TD><TD class=alignCenter>275</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4172</TD><TD class=alignCenter>841</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>QC</TH><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>17</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6026</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>957</TD><TD class=alignCenter>41</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5028</TD><TD class=alignCenter>757</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NB</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>959</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>669</TD><TD class=alignCenter>176</TD><TD class=alignCenter>114</TD><TD class=alignCenter>102</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NS</TH><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>272</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>80</TD><TD class=alignCenter>11</TD><TD class=alignCenter>181</TD><TD class=alignCenter>7</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>PE</TH><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>97</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>79</TD><TD class=alignCenter>16</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>7</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>NL</TH><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>216</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>122</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>88</TD><TD class=alignCenter>40</TD></TR><TR><TH class=bg-colour-blue scope=row>Canada</TH><TD class=alignCenter>17</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>10</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6</TD><TD class=alignCenter>34</TD><TD class=alignCenter>16847</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5578</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1000</TD><TD class=alignCenter>10269</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2859</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

            Weekly & Cumulative numbers of positive influenza specimens by age groups reported through case-based laboratory reporting, Canada, 2010-2011*

            <TABLE class=widthFull border=1 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2><TFOOT><TR><TD class=fontSize85 colSpan=11>* Please note that this table reflects the number of specimens for which demographic information was reported. These represent a subset of all positive influenza cases reported. Five provinces have reported detailed case-by-case data since the beginning of the season (BC, AB, SK, MB and ON). Delays in the reporting of data may cause data to change retrospectively.
            </TD></TR></TFOOT><TBODY><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH rowSpan=3 scope=col>Age groups</TH><TH colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Weekly
            (May 15 to May 21, 2011)</TH><TH colSpan=5 scope=colgroup>Cumulative
            (Aug. 29, 2010 to May 21, 2011)
            </TH></TR><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH colSpan=4 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH>B</TH><TH colSpan=4 scope=colgroup>Influenza A</TH><TH>B</TH></TR><TR class=bg-colour-yellow><TH scope=col>A Total</TH><TH scope=col>Pandemic H1N1</TH><TH scope=col>A/H3N2</TH><TH scope=col>A unsubtyped</TH><TH scope=col>Total</TH><TH scope=col>A Total</TH><TH scope=col>Pandemic H1N1</TH><TH scope=col>A/H3N2</TH><TH scope=col>A unsubtyped</TH><TH scope=col>Total</TH></TR><TR><TD><5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1015</TD><TD class=alignCenter>129</TD><TD class=alignCenter>738</TD><TD class=alignCenter>148</TD><TD class=alignCenter>410</TD></TR><TR><TD>5-19</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>517</TD><TD class=alignCenter>103</TD><TD class=alignCenter>296</TD><TD class=alignCenter>118</TD><TD class=alignCenter>533</TD></TR><TR><TD>20-44</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1082</TD><TD class=alignCenter>332</TD><TD class=alignCenter>530</TD><TD class=alignCenter>220</TD><TD class=alignCenter>291</TD></TR><TR><TD>45-64</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>791</TD><TD class=alignCenter>187</TD><TD class=alignCenter>436</TD><TD class=alignCenter>168</TD><TD class=alignCenter>114</TD></TR><TR><TD>65+</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2509</TD><TD class=alignCenter>44</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2059</TD><TD class=alignCenter>406</TD><TD class=alignCenter>144</TD></TR><TR><TD>Unknown</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>231</TD><TD class=alignCenter>3</TD><TD class=alignCenter>224</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1</TD></TR><TR><TD>Total</TD><TD class=alignCenter>9</TD><TD class=alignCenter>0</TD><TD class=alignCenter>5</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4</TD><TD class=alignCenter>2</TD><TD class=alignCenter>6145</TD><TD class=alignCenter>798</TD><TD class=alignCenter>4283</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1064</TD><TD class=alignCenter>1493</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>


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            Influenza tests reported and percentage of tests positive, Canada, by report week, 2010-2011


            Text Equivalent

            Percent positive influenza tests, compared to other respiratory viruses, Canada, by reporting week, 2010-2011


            Text Equivalent
            Antigenic Characterization
            Between September 1 and May 27, 2011, the National Microbiology Laboratory (NML) has antigenically characterized 950 influenza viruses that were received from provincial laboratories: 270 A/H3N2, 142 pandemic H1N1 2009 and 538 B viruses. Of the 270 influenza A/H3N2 viruses characterized, 267 (98.9%) were antigenically related to A/Perth/16/2009, which is the influenza A/H3N2 component recommended for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. Three viruses (1.1%) tested showed reduced titer with antiserum produced against A/Perth/16/2009. Of the 142 pandemic H1N1 2009 viruses characterized, 140 (98.6%) were antigenically related to the pandemic vaccine virus A/California/7/2009, which is the recommended H1N1 component for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. Two viruses (1.4%) tested showed reduced titer with antiserum produced against A/California/7/2009. Of the 538 influenza B viruses characterized, 509 (94.6%) were antigenically related to B/Brisbane/60/08 (Victoria lineage), which is the recommended influenza B component for the 2010-11 influenza vaccine. Four of the 509 viruses tested showed reduced titer with antisera produced against B/Brisbane/60/08. Twenty-five (4.6%) influenza B viruses were characterized as B/Wisconsin/01/2010-like, which belongs to the Yamagata lineage. B/Wisconsin/01/2010-like viruses are antigenically and genetically different from the previous Yamagata lineage vaccine strain B/Florida/04/2006.
            Antiviral Resistance
            Since the beginning of the 2010-2011 season, NML has tested 633 influenza A isolates (474 A/H3N2 and 159 pandemic H1N1 2009) for amantadine resistance and found that 473 influenza A/H3N2 were resistant and one was sensitive. All 159 influenza A/H1N1 viruses were resistant to amantadine. Of 923 influenza viruses (248 A/H3N2, 146 pandemic H1N1 2009, and 529 influenza B) tested for resistance to oseltamivir, 247 A/H3N2 viruses were sensitive and one was resistant with the E119V mutation. The resistant case was associated with oseltamivir prophylaxis/treatment. Of the 146 pandemic H1N1 2009 isolates tested for oseltamivir resistance, 145 were sensitive and one was resistant with the H275Y mutation. The resistant case was associated with oseltamivir treatment. Of the 529 B virus isolates tested, 528 were sensitive to oseltamivir and one was resistant with the D198N mutation. Of 914 influenza viruses (244 A/H3N2, 143 pandemic H1N1 2009, and 527 influenza B) tested for zanamivir resistance all 244 A/H3N2 and 143 pandemic H1N1 2009 isolates were found to be sensitive. Of the 527 B virus isolates tested, 526 were sensitive to zanamivir and one was resistant with the D198N mutation.
            Severe Illness Surveillance

            Note that all numbers are preliminary and numbers may fluctuate because of delays in reporting
            Paediatric Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
            In week 20, 6 new laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated paediatric (16 years of age and under) hospitalizations were reported through the Immunization Monitoring Program Active (IMPACT) network: all with influenza B, from BC(1), QC(4) and NL(1). Influenza A was associated with the majority of hospitalizations earlier in the season (weeks 47 to 09). Since week 10, however, influenza B accounted for more cases than influenza A each week. Six paediatric deaths have been reported via IMPACT this season: 3 children between 6 and 23 months old, two with pandemic H1N1 2009 and one with influenza B; two children between 2 and 4 years old, both with influenza B; and one child between 10 and 16 years old with influenza A/H3. All cases had underlying comorbidities.
            Since the beginning of the season, 668 hospitalizations with laboratory-confirmed influenza have been reported: 103 (15.4%) as influenza A/H3N2, 23 (3.4%) pandemic H1N1 2009, 326 (48.8%) as un-subtyped influenza A, and 216 (32.3%) influenza B. The distribution of cases to date by age group was as follows: 16.8% among 0-5 month olds; 27.5% among 6-23 month olds; 28.7% among the 2-4 year-olds; 16.5% among 5-9 year-olds; and 10.5% among children 10-16 years old.
            Adult Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
            During week 20, no new hospitalizations with laboratory-confirmed influenza among adults (16 years of age and older) were reported through the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP). Since the beginning of the season, 969 hospitalized cases have been reported: 202 (20.8%) A/H3N2, 48 (5.0%) pandemic H1N1 2009, 644 (66.5%) influenza A unsubtyped, and 75 (7.7%) influenza B, from all reporting provinces. To date, 651 of the 969 (67.2%) cases were aged 65 years or older and 437 (45.1%) were males.

            Aggregate Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths
            Nine provinces and territories (excluding BC, QC, NB and NU) currently conduct severe outcomes surveillance and report weekly numbers of hospitalizations, ICU admissions and deaths with laboratory-confirmed influenza. In week 20, no deaths with influenza were reported. Among the 224 fatal cases reported since the beginning of the influenza season, influenza A/H3N2 was identified in 60.7% (136/224), unsubtyped influenza A in 28.1% (63/224), pandemic H1N1 2009 in 6.7% (15/224), and influenza B in 4.5% (10/224). Seventy-nine percent (177/224) of these fatal cases were among persons 65 years of age or older, and another 11% (25/224) were between the ages of 45 and 64 years old, in keeping with the age-groups usually affected by A/H3N2.

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            http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/fluwatch/.../index-eng.php
            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
            -Nelson Mandela

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