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Cambodia - MoH confirms 2 new H5N1 avian flu human deaths - October 8, 2023+

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  • Cambodia - MoH confirms 2 new H5N1 avian flu human deaths - October 8, 2023+

    hat tip Shiloh

    I can not translate the MoH report but I do see "H5N1" mentioned. So there is some official announcement of an H5N1 avian flu event.


    Press Release on Avian Influenza Deaths in Cambodia



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    ក្រសួងសុខាភិបាលនៃព្រះរាជាណាចក្រកម្ពុជា, Phnom Penh. 1,317,947 likes · 15,263 talking about this. This is the government institution working on health for the country.



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Media report states this is the 39th case which would be correct if this is a new case. However, there have already been 58 total cumulative Cambodian cases and 2 cases in 2023. If new, this would be the 3rd case in 2023.

    A 50-year-old man living in Tros commune, Romeas Hek district, Svay Rieng province has died of bird flu (H5N1). This is according to the press release of the Ministry of Health on October 8.

    This is the 39th case of the 58th human case of bird flu since 2005 and the second in 2023. According to the Ministry of Health, the man's neighbor recently bought chickens to store and then the chickens at the victim's house and about 50 other chickens died. The dead chickens were also shared by the villagers.

    The Ministry of Health's next response team and experts have been investigating the source of the bird flu outbreak and will continue to look for suspected cases and stakeholders to prevent transmission to others in the community. At the same time, the Ministry of Health reminds citizens to be more vigilant about bird flu, which continues to pose a threat to people, especially children and vulnerable groups.






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    FluTrackers H5N1 case list link

    WHO - Avian Influenza Weekly Update Number 914 22 September 2023 link



    Attached Files

  • #2
    The MoH report posted above has been translated using Google Images:


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    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

    Comment


    • #3
      Note: While I was composing this post, I see Pathfinder used a similar method to translated the same document.


      Since this is posted as a graphic, not a document, translating is tough. But I've managed - using Google lens - to come up with the following rough translation. There are a couple of `problems' with it, but that may be the kludgy translation.

      1) This document calls this the 59th case for Cambodia, but the WHO already had 58 cases on their last update.
      2) They call this the 2nd case of 2023. We saw two cases (father & daughter) last February.
      3) the translation says the patient was `demolished', which I presume means `dead'. But that's just a guess (in which case, this would be the 2nd fatal case of 2023).

      There is nothing on the Cambodian MOH webpage, but they haven't been updating it properly for several years. Facebook now seems to be their information portal.

      So, for what it's worth . . .


      Government
      Press Release on
      Deaths from influenza


      The Ministry of Health of the Kingdom of Cambodia would like to inform the public that one case of bird flu has been confirmed as positive for H5N1 virus from the National Institute of Public Health on a 50-year-old man on October 7, 202. Demolished in Prak Teap village, Trasam commune, Romeas Hek district, Svay Rieng province.

      According to the investigation, a neighbor bought a chicken and stored it for sale. More than 50 chickens died at his house and a neighbor's house and were distributed to relatives to eat.

      The Ministry of Health's National and Sub-National Emergency Response Team has been researching the outbreak of this type of bird flu and responding according to national and international methods. And people will continue to search for suspects and victims to prevent further transmission in the community and conduct health education campaigns in the affected villages

      The Ministry of Health would like to remind all citizens to take care
      Beware of bird flu because H5N1 bird flu continues to threaten
      Citizens, especially children, are at risk and vulnerable. The case
      Is the 58th bird flu case (39 deaths) in humans since 200

      The second case occurred in 2023.

      Transmission: H5N1 bird flu is a flu virus that is usually transmitted from one bird to another, but can sometimes be transmitted from bird to human through close contact, illness or death. Avian
      influenza in humans is a serious disease that requires timely treatment. Although it is not easily transmitted from person to person, it can also cause seasonal flu.

      Health Plot No. 80, Samdech Pen Nuth (289) Phnom Penh Tel: Tuosan (855-23) 885 97 or Health Plot No. 80 - Samdech Pen Nung (289) - Phnom Penh Tel: Fax: (855-23) 885 97
      Sunday-93 Roch Khek, Song of the Year of Thao Panchasak, 256 B.C.

      Phnom Penh, October 08, 2023

      Preventive measures: The Royal Government's educational message includes: washing hands with soap and water before eating and after contact with birds, keeping children away from animals, birds away from living, do not eat sick or dead birds, and All the birds that make the episode must be cooked well.

      The Ministry of Health will continue to inform the public about related information: Publicity through the Telegram Channel and the official Facebook page of the Ministry of Bird Health on humans in the Kingdom of Cambodia, the official Facebook page of the Department of Infectious Diseases and the website www.cdcmoh.gov.kh This includes health education materials that can be downloaded, viewed and used. For more information, please contact the Ministry of Health's hotline number 115 without contacting the Ministry of Health at: 012 488 981 or 012 436 8
      All medical discussions are for educational purposes. I am not a doctor, just a retired paramedic. Nothing I post should be construed as specific medical advice. If you have a medical problem, see your physician.

      Comment


      • #4
        Click image for larger version  Name:	image.png Views:	1 Size:	36.9 KB ID:	980243
        Map of Cambodia highlighting Svay Rieng Province
        /https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Svay_Rieng_province


        ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Text and image translated with Google

        HE Peng Pursa, Governor Of Svay Rieng Province, Instructed The Governors Of 8 Municipalities And Districts To Strengthen Measures To Prevent The Spread Of Avian Influenza

        Release Date October 09, 2023

        APP MoINFO Phnom Penh, October 9, 2023​


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        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
        -Nelson Mandela

        Comment


        • #5
          Preprint: A Timely Survey of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Related to Avian Influenza (H5N1) in Rural, Cambodia




          #17,714



          In yesterday's report (see Cambodian MOH Reports A Human H5N1 Case) we learned of another fatal H5N1 infection in a Cambodian village in Svay Rieng province, following the death of `more than 50 chickens' at the victim's house (and neighbor).

          According to the MOH report, the dead chickens were `. . . distributed to relatives to eat'.

          For many Cambodian villagers, their wealth - and their food security - lies in what they can raise, forage, or grow. The sudden loss of 50 chickens would represent a substantial blow, and so them sharing these birds with relatives so they can be quickly consumed makes a lot of sense.

          It is not much different from the stories my father told me of growing up as a boy during the Great Depression. Once a week his uncle would tell him to go to the chicken coop and pick out the `sickliest looking chicken' for the Sunday stew pot.

          When times are tough, you don't squander resources. And you eat the healthiest chickens last.

          Last week I came across a preprint - published in late September - of a cross-section survey conducted last August in Prey Veng province, where an 11 year-old girl died of H5N1 earlier this year.

          Participants (n=208) were invited to be interviewed face-to-face on their knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to avian influenza.

          Although this study is limited both in number of participants, and geographic scope, it is probably fairly representative of the practices of tens, or even hundreds, of millions of people living in this part of the world.

          We've seen many of the practices described before, including the consumption or improper disposal of dead poultry, often in connection with H5N1 spillovers.

          This is a timely and informative survey, and well worth perusing in its entirety. Due to its length, I've only posted some excerpts. I'll have a bit more after the break.
          Abstract


          From 2003 to 25 February 2023, the avian influenza (H5N1) virus was confirmed in 59 human infections, including 39 deaths (~66% case-fatality rate) reported in 13 of 25 provinces in Cambodia. We aimed to assess current knowledge, attitude, and practice toward changes in poultry handling behaviors, poultry consumption, and poultry mortality reporting among rural villagers in areas affected by Avian influenza (H5N1) in Cambodia.

          A cross-section survey was conducted in August 2023. There were 208 participants residing in Prey Veng province who were invited to be interviewed face-to-face. Descriptive statistics were performed using STATA V17. The participants' average age was 55 years old (SD=13.3 years), 78.4% were female, 59% had completed primary school, 56.7% were farmers, 68.3% raised chickens in their backyards, and 10.2% raised ducks, 23% of participants cooked sick or dead birds for their families, 32% knowing information about avian influenza virus was a lower proportion from healthcare providers, 10.6% from village health support groups were, and 2% from village animal health workers were only, 49% have been reported poultry illness and deaths to local authorities.

          The avian influenza epidemic in Cambodia is a genuine threat to animals and a possible concern to humans. To prevent and control this, we strongly advise everyone who works with poultry or wild game birds always to be prepared to follow appropriate hygiene standards and to cook poultry meat properly.

          (SNIP)



          Discussion

          We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 208 subjects in Prey Veng province from 4 August to 7 2023 to assess current knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding changes in poultry handling behaviors, poultry consumption, and poultry mortality reporting. Since 23 February 2023, Cambodia's Ministry of Health has reported to WHO one confirmed fatal case of human infection with the avian influenza A(H5N1) virus in an 11-year-old girl from Prey Veng province. Then, on 23 February 2023, epidemiological and analytical studies revealed the second case, the father of the index child [13].

          Within the affected village, information, education, and communication (IEC) campaigns were implemented, including leaflets distributed and broadcast media coverage on local television and radio to inform the public through messages aimed at reducing exposure to disease, preventing disease spread in poultry, and encouraging reporting. In our survey, the proportion of subjects who work as farmers was 57%, raising chickens in the backyard was 68.3%, and raising ducks was 10.2%.

          Cambodia's higher-risk behaviors or vulnerability groups need priority intervention to reduce infectious and zoonotic diseases. Since the first outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza caused by viruses of the H5N1 subtype (H5N1 HPAI) were detected in geese in 1996 in the Chinese province of Guangdong and 1997 in Hong Kong, Until today, 54 countries in Asia, Europe, and Africa have reported H5N1 HPAI outbreaks among poultry; outbreaks in poultry farms have been reported in every country in Southeast Asia (SEA) [2,6,19,20].

          Furthermore, we noticed that 23% of participants cooked sick or dead poultries for their families. Previous research in Cambodia found that direct contact with chickens suspected of being infected with the H5N1 virus was harmful [20]. Of the participants who reported knowing information about the avian influenza virus, a lower proportion from healthcare providers was 32%; village health support groups were 10.6%; village animal health workers were only 2%. Implementing information, education, and communication (IEC) campaigns should be conducting refresher training for villagers. This study found that 49% reported poultry illness and deaths to local authorities.

          These reported practices did not improve during the study period. Raising backyard poultry in rural Cambodia provides significant income and nutrition with an excellent annual investment. Government recommendations to reduce the risk of avian influenza transmission did not impact the behavior of poultry producers.
          Further research should prioritize developing interventions that simultaneously reduce the risk of avian influenza transmission and increase the productivity of backyard poultry [21]. However, closer relationships between local healthcare providers and residents could promote early healthcare behaviors in people living in rural communities. Educational programs conducted by local healthcare providers might be effective. Still, residents' attitudes must be considered when planning health education in communities with H5N1 patients in neighboring areas [22].

          (Continue . . . )


          Over the years, the majority of Asian H5N1 human infections have been linked to attending or working in Live Bird Markets (LBMs), or the raising of backyard poultry. Repeated attempts to shut down LBMs have met with stiff resistance, and have encouraged the illegal trade in live birds (see Beijing Orders Closure Of Live Bird Markets To Control H7N9).

          People are often afraid to report unusual poultry deaths in their backyard flock, for fear the authorities will come and cull the rest of their birds. So midnight dumping of dead birds in the local river or lake are common (see Vietnam: Dozens Of Sacks Of H5N6 Infected Chickens Dumped on Nghe An Beach).

          Convincing people that something they have been doing for generations - like raising chickens in their backyard - could suddenly be dangerous can be a hard `sell'. We saw similar (and often bitter) resistance to the notion that beloved camels in Saudi Arabia carried a new, deadly coronavirus (seeSaudi Camel Owners Threaten Over MERS `Slander’).

          But the fact remains the level of H5N1 (and other zoonotic viruses) continues to increase around the world, and spillovers - and increased food insecurity - are likely to increase as well.

          Getting that message out - and offering people practical alternatives - needs to be a high priority.


          #17,714 In yesterday's report (see  Cambodian MOH Reports A Human H5N1 Case )  we learned of another fatal H5N1 infection in a Cambodian vil...
          All medical discussions are for educational purposes. I am not a doctor, just a retired paramedic. Nothing I post should be construed as specific medical advice. If you have a medical problem, see your physician.

          Comment


          • #6
            Via the Cambodian Health Ministry Facebook page, we have a 2nd statement from the MOH announcing a 2nd (fatal) H5N1 case, this time a 2 year-old girl from Prey Veng Province. This is not the same province as yesterday's case.

            Log into Facebook to start sharing and connecting with your friends, family, and people you know.


            I've posted the translation below the graphic.

            Click image for larger version

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            Kingdom of Cambodia, Nation, Religion, King
            Ministry of Health
            Press Release

            Two-year-old girl dies of bird flu

            The Ministry of Health of the Kingdom of Cambodia would like to inform the public that there is another case of bird flu in a 2-year-old girl who died and was confirmed positive for H5N1 bird flu virus (H5N1) from National Institute of Public Health on October 9, 2023, located in Chhmar Lot village, Snoeng Khang Tbong commune, Kamchay Mear district, Prey Veng province. According to the interrogation, there were dead chickens in the children's house.

            On the night of October 9, 2023, the emergency response teams of the Ministry of Health at the national and sub-national levels have been investigating the occurrence of this type of bird flu and responding according to national methods and protocols in cooperation. The emergency response team will look for sources of transmission in both animals and humans, and continue to search for suspected and affected cases to prevent transmission to others in the community, as well as distribute Tamiflu to close contacts and Health education campaign for the people in the village where the incident occurred.

            The Ministry of Health would like to remind all citizens to be careful about bird flu because H5N1 bird flu continues to threaten the health of people, especially children who are at risk and Vulnerability. The deaths are the 59th case of bird flu and 40 deaths in humans since 2005, and the third in 2023.

            Transmission: H5N1 bird flu is a flu virus that is usually transmitted from sick birds to other birds, but can sometimes be transmitted from birds to humans through close contact with sick or dead birds. Avian influenza in humans is a serious disease that requires timely hospitalization. Although it is not easily transmitted from person to person, but if it can transform itself, can it be transmitted as well? (Seasonal flu, too.
            Office of the Ministry of Health, Lot 80, Samdech Pen Nuth (St. 289), Phnom Penh Tel: Fax: (855-23) 885 970/884 909​
            All medical discussions are for educational purposes. I am not a doctor, just a retired paramedic. Nothing I post should be construed as specific medical advice. If you have a medical problem, see your physician.

            Comment


            • #7
              In looking through this, and the links, I see nothing on the clades - has anyone else? While most of the world is dominated by 2.3.4.4b what little data there is from Cambodia, and SE Asia generally, 2.3.2.1c seems dominant, but there is also some 2.3.4.4b. Given how much 2.3.4.4b is circulating, it would be nice to be sure it was not that strain that is showing zoonotic potential.

              Comment


              • #8
                2-year-old girl dies of bird flu (H5N1)




                ​Date: Mon 9 Oct 2023

                On the night of 9 Oct 2023, the Ministry of Health of the Kingdom of Cambodia announced that a 2-year-old girl living in Chhma Lod village, South Snoung commune, Kamchay Mear district, Prey Veng province had died and was confirmed positive for bird flu (H5N1).

                A press release from the Ministry of Health stated that, according to inquiries at the home of the child who lost [her] life, there were a lot of dead chickens.

                Also, 2 days before the death of the girl living in Prey Veng province, a 50-year-old man living in Mrak Teap village, Tros commune, Romeas Hek district, Svay Rieng province died of bird flu (H5N1) on 7 Oct 2023.

                The reason the man living in Svay Rieng province became infected with bird flu and lost his life was a neighbor of the man who bought chickens to store and sell, then saw the chickens in his house and the house of a neighbor began to die. More than 50 men in their 50s also brought dead chickens to share with relatives.

                The Ministry of Health claims that the Ministry's national and sub-national emergency response teams are investigating the outbreak of bird flu and responding to national methods and protocols. Health and veterinarians search for sources of transmission on both animals and humans, and continue to search for suspected and affected cases to prevent transmission to others in the community and conduct health education campaigns in the villages where the incident took place.

                The Ministry of Health has also again warned residents to be vigilant against H5N1 bird flu as the H5N1 bird flu virus continues to pose a threat to public health, especially children, who are at risk and vulnerable.

                Overall, the death toll is the 59th case of bird flu, with 40 deaths since the bird flu outbreak in humans in 2005. This is the 3rd case that happened in 2023.

                According to the Ministry of Health, H5N1 bird flu is a flu virus that is usually transmitted from sick birds to other birds, but can sometimes be transmitted from birds to humans through close contact with sick or dead birds. Avian influenza in humans is a serious disease that requires timely hospitalization. Although it is not easily transmitted from person to person, it can be as contagious as the seasonal flu.
                https://www.kampucheathmey.com/local-news/593703
                CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

                treyfish2004@yahoo.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  WHO - Avian Influenza A (H5N1) - Cambodia

                  26 February 2023

                  Description of the Situation

                  Situation at a glance

                  On 23 February 2023, the Cambodia International Health Regulations (IHR) National Focal Point (NFP) reported one confirmed case of human infection with avian influenza A (H5N1) virus to WHO. A second case, a family contact of the first case, was reported on 24 February 2023. An outbreak investigation is ongoing including determining the exposure of these two reported cases to the virus.

                  These are the first two cases of avian influenza A (H5N1) reported from Cambodia since 2014. In December 2003, Cambodia reported an outbreak of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 for the first time affecting wild birds. Since then, and until 2014, human cases due to poultry-to-human transmission have been sporadically reported in Cambodia.

                  H5N1 infection in humans can cause severe disease, has a high mortality rate, and is notifiable under IHR (2005).

                  Description of the cases
                  On 23 February 2023, the IHR NFP of Cambodia notified WHO of a confirmed case of human infection with avian influenza A (H5N1) virus. The case was an 11-year-old girl from Prey Veng province, in the south of Cambodia. On 16 February 2023, the case developed symptoms and received treatment at a local hospital. On 21 February 2023, the case was admitted to the National Pediatric Hospital with severe pneumonia. A sample was collected the same day through the severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) sentinel system and tested positive for avian influenza A (H5N1) virus by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) at the National Institute of Public Health on the same day. The sample was also sent to Institute Pasteur Cambodia, the National Influenza Center, which confirmed the finding. The patient died on 22 February 2023. Cambodia shared the genetic sequence data of the virus from the index case through the publicly accessible database GISAID. Virus sequencing shows the H5N1 virus belongs to clade 2.3.2.1c, and similar to the 2.3.2.1c clade viruses circulating in poultry in southeast Asia since 2014.

                  A total of twelve close contacts (eight asymptomatic close contacts and four symptomatic who met the suspected case definition) of the index case were identified and samples were collected and tested. Laboratory investigations confirmed the second case on 23 February 2023, the father of the index child. The father, who is asymptomatic, is in isolation at the referral hospital. The eleven other samples tested negative for A (H5N1) and SARS-CoV-2.

                  As of 25 February 2023, a total of 58 cases of human infection with avian influenza A (H5N1) virus have been reported in Cambodia since 2003, including 38 deaths (CFR 66%); nine cases and seven deaths between 2003 to 2009 and 47 cases and 30 deaths between 2010 to 2014 were reported.

                  Public Health Response
                  A joint animal-human health investigation is underway in the province of the index case to identify the source and mode of transmission. Additionally, a high-level government response is underway to contain any further spread of the virus.

                  WHO Risk Assessment
                  These are the first human infections reported in Cambodia since 2014. Human infection can cause severe disease and has a high mortality rate. Almost all Influenza A (H5N1) infection cases in people have been associated with close contact with infected live or dead birds, or Influenza A (H5N1)-contaminated environments. Based on evidence so far, the virus does not infect humans easily and spreads from person-to-person appears to be unusual. An outbreak investigation is ongoing including identifying the source of exposure of the two reported cases to the virus.

                  Since the virus continues to be detected in poultry populations, further human cases can be expected.

                  Whenever avian influenza viruses are circulating in poultry, there is a risk for sporadic infection or small clusters of human cases due to exposure to infected poultry or contaminated environments. From 2003 to 25 February 2023, a total of 873 human cases of infection with influenza A (H5N1) and 458 deaths have been reported globally from 21 countries.

                  Public health measures from both the human and animal health agencies have been implemented including monitoring of contacts of the laboratory-confirmed cases. While further characterization of the virus from these human cases is pending, available epidemiological and virological evidence suggest that current A(H5) viruses have not acquired the ability of sustained transmission among humans, thus the likelihood of sustained human-to-human spread is low. Based on available information so far, WHO assesses the risk to the general population posed by this virus to be low.

                  The risk assessment will be reviewed as needed as further epidemiological or virological information becomes available.

                  Vaccines against avian influenza A (H5N1) for human use have been developed for pandemic use but are not widely available. WHO, through its Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System (GISRS) monitors the evolution of the virus, conducts risk assessment, and recommends the development of additional new candidate vaccine viruses for pandemic preparedness purposes.

                  Close analysis of the epidemiological situation, further characterization of the most recent viruses (human and poultry) and serological investigations are critical to assess associated risk and to adjust risk management measures promptly.

                  WHO Advice
                  Given reports of sporadic influenza A (H5N1) cases in humans, the widespread circulation in birds and the constantly evolving nature of influenza viruses, WHO continues to stress the importance of global surveillance to detect and monitor virological, epidemiological, and clinical changes associated with emerging or circulating influenza viruses that may affect human (or animal) health and timely virus sharing for risk assessment.

                  When avian influenza viruses are circulating in an area, people involved in high-risk tasks such as sampling sick birds, culling, and disposing of infected birds, eggs, litter and cleaning of contaminated premises should be provided with and trained in the proper use of appropriate personal protective equipment. All persons involved in these tasks should be registered and monitored closely by local health authorities for seven days following the last day of contact with infected poultry or their environments.

                  In the case of a confirmed or suspected human infection caused by a novel influenza virus with pandemic potential, including a variant virus, a thorough epidemiologic investigation (even while awaiting the confirmatory laboratory results) of history of exposure to animals, of travel, and contact tracing should be conducted. The epidemiological investigation should include early identification of unusual respiratory events that could signal person-to-person transmission of the novel virus and clinical samples collected from the time and place that the case occurred should be tested and sent to a WHO Collaboration Centre for further characterization.

                  Currently, there is no vaccine widely available to protect against avian influenza in humans. WHO recommends that all people involved in work with poultry or birds should have a seasonal influenza vaccination to reduce the potential risk of reassortment.

                  Travelers to countries with known outbreaks of animal influenza should avoid farms, contact with animals in live animal markets, entering areas where animals may be slaughtered, or contact with any surfaces that appear to be contaminated with animal faeces. General precautions include regular hand washing and good food safety and food hygiene practices. Should infected individuals from affected areas travel internationally, their infection may be detected in another country during travel or after arrival. If this were to occur, further community-level spread is considered unlikely as on the basis of available information, this virus has not acquired the ability to transmit easily among humans.

                  WHO advises against the application of any travel or trade restrictions based on the current information available on this event. WHO does not advise special traveler screening at points of entry or restrictions with regard to the current situation of influenza viruses at the human-animal interface.

                  All human infections caused by a novel influenza subtype are notifiable under the International Health Regulations (IHR) and State Parties to the IHR (2005) are required to immediately notify WHO of any laboratory-confirmed case of a recent human infection caused by an influenza A virus with the potential to cause a pandemic. Evidence of illness is not required for this report.

                  https://www.who.int/emergencies/dise...20since%202014.




                  Comment


                • #10
                  Cambodia reports 3rd bird flu death this year
                  October 10, 2023

                  A two-year-old girl from southeastern Cambodia’s Prey Veng province has died of H5N1 human avian influenza, the third death from the virus recorded in the country this year, the Ministry of Health said Monday.

                  The toddler tested positive for H5N1 bird flu on Monday, the ministry said in a news release, without specifying her time of death.

                  The ministry said Tamiflu (oseltamivir), an antiviral drug to prevent the bird flu from spreading, was distributed to people who had direct contact with the girl.

                  ... Nearly all reported human cases since 2022 were associated with poultry exposures, and no instances of mammal-to-human or human-to-human transmission of HPAI A(H5N1) virus have been identified. In a few cases, the source of exposure to HPAI A(H5N1) virus was unknown. ...

                  A two-year-old girl from southeastern Cambodia's Prey Veng province has died of H5N1 human avian influenza, the third death from the virus recorded in the country this year, the Ministry of Health said Monday.


                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Provincial authorities at the city-district level to prevent bird flu while the Ministry is investigating the death of a man

                    Chea Sokny | Publication date 10 October 2023 | 09:15 ICT Shares




                    Svay Rieng: Svay Rieng provincial leaders have instructed provincial governors to take measures to prevent the spread of H5N1 bird flu after A 50-year-old man died of the disease while the Ministry of Health's emergency response team was investigating the case.
                    The Ministry of Health on October 8 issued a press release on cases of bird flu deaths in Cambodia after the results were confirmed By the National Institute of Public Health on 50-year-old men on October 7, 2023.
                    The ministry said that when questioned, it appeared that the man's neighbor had bought a chicken to store and then sold it. There were more than 50 chickens in his house and in his neighbor's house, and the dead chickens were distributed to the brothers. Take to eat.
                    In this case, the emergency response teams of the Ministry of Health at the national and sub-national levels have been investigating the occurrence of this type of bird flu and respond to National Ministry of Methods and Protocols: The Ministry of Health states: Sources transmit both animals and humans and will continue to search for suspected cases and victims to prevent transmission to others in the community and "A campaign to educate the health of the people in the villages where the incident took place."
                    On October 9, Mr. Peng Po Sa, Governor of Svay Rieng Province, instructed all the Board of Governors in all provinces and districts in the province to participate in prevention. Do not spread the disease to your community.

                    He mentioned in a letter to the governors of the eight districts to educate people to clean their homes and wash their hands often. With soap and water before eating and after contact with birds.
                    He added that children should be kept away from birds and birds should be kept away from living places and animals should not be eaten. Sick or dead birds and all birds made for eating must be well cooked.
                    Mr. Peng Pursa stated: "People must be advised in case they report a large number of sick or dead birds. "The authorities have the authority to strictly take sick or dead birds to cook."
                    It should be noted that the Provincial Department of Health and Administration on October 7 took the body of the 50-year-old man for testing at the Health Institute. The public will get a positive result of the H5N1 bird flu virus on the afternoon of October 8, 2023.
                    According to the Facebook page of Svay Rieng Provincial Administration, the specialized department has taken measures to spray pesticides in the affected areas and instructed the residents to take The dead animals were buried and health education was provided to the families of the victims, the festival participants and the villagers.
                    Mr. Sok Sotheavuth, Director of Svay Rieng Provincial Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, said on October 9 that he and the provincial veterinary team are collecting And search for chickens and other birds found to be infected to be burned.
                    "We are collecting chickens, but we do not know how many because we are collecting," he said. The Ministry of Health has once again reminded all citizens to be vigilant about bird flu because the disease is still Continue to pose a health threat, especially to children who are at risk and vulnerable group.
                    According to the Ministry of Health, this is the 58th case of bird flu (39 deaths) in humans since 2005. And this is the second case that happened this year.
                    Please be reminded that on February 22, 2023, the Ministry of Health announced the death of an 11-year-old 6-month-old girl living in Roleang village, Romlech commune. Sithor Kandal district, Prey Veng province, due to H5N1 bird flu.
                    The H5N1 bird flu virus is a flu virus that is usually transmitted from sick birds to other birds, but can sometimes be transmitted to humans. Close contact with sick or dead birds. Avian influenza in humans is a serious disease that requires timely hospitalization. The disease, although not easily transmitted from person to person, can be as contagious as the seasonal flu.





                    ​​អាជ្ញាធរ​ខេត្ដ​ឱ្យ​ថ្នាក់ក្រុង​-​ស្រុក​ទប់ស្កាត់​ជំងឺផ្ដាសាយបក្សី ខណៈ​ក្រសួង​កំពុង​ស្រាវជ្រាវ​ករណី​ស្លាប់​បុរស​ម្នាក់​​


                    Last edited by sharon sanders; October 10, 2023, 03:48 AM. Reason: fixed link
                    CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

                    treyfish2004@yahoo.com

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                    • #12
                      Both of the press releases for the 50 year old man and the 2 year old girl are now posted on the official Ministry of Health website:



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                      • #13
                        Romeas Hek district, Svay Rieng​ is the province where the 50 year old man (above) was confirmed H5N1 positive.


                        Dozens of chickens and ducks continue to die while two others are suspected of catching bird flu


                        Emerged
                        52 minutes ago At
                        Tuesday, October 10, 2023


                        According to the Svay Rieng Provincial Health Department, about 130 chickens and ducks in Trok village, Ampil commune, Romeas Hek district, Svay Rieng province, died in a row, while two other family members died of fever, cough and fever. Chest suspected of being infected with bird flu (H5N1) and was taken by doctors to the district hospital overnight, October 9, 2023.


                        Mr. Peng Pursa, Governor of Svay Rieng Province, once again instructed all municipal authorities and relevant departments and units to continue to pay the utmost attention, especially in districts and districts where this case has not yet occurred. And advise people to report immediately if there is a case of dead chickens.

                        Two people have recently died from the H5N1 bird flu virus. First, a 50-year-old man living in Tros commune, Romeas Hek district, Svay Rieng province died of bird flu (H5N1). Second, a 2-year-old girl in Chhmar Lot village, South Snong commune, Kamchay Mear district, Prey Veng province lost her life and was confirmed positive for bird flu (H5N1).


                        The Ministry of Health has also again warned residents to be vigilant against H5N1 bird flu as the H5N1 bird flu virus continues to pose a threat to public health, especially children, who are at risk and vulnerable. .









                        ហើយត្រូវបានក្រុមគ្រូពេទ្យដឹកយកទៅព្យាបាលនៅមន្ទីរពេទ្យស្រុកទាំងយប់...

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                        • #14
                          Translation Google

                          Svay Rieng Provincial Administration
                          1d ·

                          Svay Rieng Provincial Administration would like to inform more information about the case of bird flu as of October 9, this year, the working group of the General Department of Animal Health and Animal Production in collaboration with the Department of Agriculture, Hunting and Fisheries and the Provincial Production and Veterinary Office. Svay Rieng and local authorities implemented veterinary measures in Mrak Teap village, Tros commune, Romeas Hek district, Svay Rieng province, which had a positive case of bird flu on 1 chicken last night, October 08, 2023 (Institute results) among chickens. A total of 34 ducks and 20 dead ducks belonged to a farmer family named Chen Sok in the above village.

                          The team implemented the following first emergency measures:

                          1. Burned 14 birds of the above family, one of which was found to be positive for the bird flu virus and sprayed with disinfectant and introduced to the family.
                          2. For the location of the house where there are dead people, the team is implementing veterinary measures.
                          3. The team is inspecting the situation of poultry in the surrounding area, especially in the area where there are cases of death, to carry out negotiations to destroy the birds and apply pesticides.

                          With this, the team continued to spray and collect birds to burn and take a total of 26 samples, of which 21 were burned (17 chickens and 4 ducks) and 4 samples were examined. Heads (3 chickens, 1 duck).

                          ...


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                          រដ្ឋបាលខេត្តស្វាយរៀង, Phumi Svay Rieng, Svay Rieng, Cambodia. 66,134 likes · 1,813 talking about this. Serving social benefits
                          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                          -Nelson Mandela

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                          • #15
                            Cambodia records second bird flu death in a week, third this year, after no cases since 2014


                            A 2-year-old girl has become the second person in Cambodia to die of bird flu this week, and the third this year

                            BySOPHENG CHEANG Associated Press
                            October 10, 2023, 5:08 AM​....

                            Chhuon Srey Mao, the 22-year-old mother of the dead girl, told The Associated Press by phone from Chhmar Lort village that her daughter fell sick on Oct. 1 with symptoms of coughing, high temperature and vomiting. The girl received treatment from a local physician for five days, but was sent on Oct. 5 to the capital Phnom Penh for advanced care when her condition worsened. She died at the children’s hospital.

                            The mother said that from late September, several chickens in her village, including at least four of her own, had died. She added that she had discarded the chickens that died, not cooking them for food. People have caught the virus both from domestic fowl and from wild birds such as ducks.

                            “I have no idea why my daughter would contract bird flu because she never touched or ate the dead chickens,” Chhuon Srey Mao said, “But I presume that she may have become infected with the virus when she played in the yard, as she normally did, where the chickens had been.”.She said the five surviving members of her family are in good health, but she is worried about them. Health officials have been to her village to deploy a virus-killing spray at her home and others, and advised all the villagers to report if they get sick...https://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireSt...​​​​
                            CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

                            treyfish2004@yahoo.com

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