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  • Bangladesh - H5N1 Mar 16th - Mar 29th

    UN Agency Says Burma Needs Help to Fight Bird Flu

    http://www.huliq.com/15263/un-agency...fight-bird-flu

    A United Nations agency says that while Burma responded quickly to outbreaks of bird flu last month, it needs more help to continue its fight against the disease in the long term.

    The Food and Agriculture Organization, FAO, says that the source of an outbreak that spread to four townships around Rangoon in late February is still unknown.

    To help prevent further outbreaks, the FAO says that more intensive surveillance was needed around Rangoon.

    It is also recommending that the military-ruled country strengthen its lab capabilities, animal health services and public awareness campaigns.

    The FAO is providing Burma with $1.4 million in emergency assistance to help fight the disease. - VOA News

  • #2
    Bangladesh - H5N1 Spreading

    Bangladesh culls 30,000 chickens after birds' death sparks bird flu fears

    http://www.chinapost.com.tw/latestne...7322/45037.htm

    2007/3/22
    DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP)


    Bangladeshi authorities recently culled about 30,000 chickens at a state-owned farm after many died mysteriously, sparking fears of a bird flu outbreak that later proved unfounded, an official and a domestic news agency said Thursday.

    Chickens at a farm owned and run by Biman Bangladesh Airlines began dying last month, prompting authorities to cull all the birds in the farm this month, an official of the country's livestock department told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity in line with official policy.

    But authorities later got confirmation from at least three local laboratories that it was Exotic Newcastle, a fatal respiratory virus in birds, that caused the deaths of the chickens, the official said without providing further details.

    "Initially we could not determine what happened but we didn't take any risk," the official said. "We are now contented that it's not bird flu."

    Local news agency bdnews24.com reported that samples of the infected chickens have been sent to a laboratory in Thailand to reconfirm the earlier test results.

    "We are convinced by the local laboratory test results. To make the results internationally convincing, we have sent the samples to a foreign laboratory," the agency quoted an unnamed government official as saying.

    The agency said the virus has spread to some other private farms in Savar, an industrial zone outside the capital, Dhaka.

    The virus, which is locally known as Ranikhet, is a contagious and fatal viral disease affecting all species of birds but it has no record of attacking humans. It is so deadly that many birds die without showing any signs of disease. A death rate of almost 100 percent can occur in unvaccinated poultry flocks while it can also infect and cause death even in vaccinated birds.

    The South Asian nation has so far reported no cases of bird flu and it has banned import of poultry products from more than 50 countries as part of a preventive measure to check bird flu from entering the country.

    An outbreak of H5N1 virus in Bangladesh could devastate the impoverished country's poultry industry, comprised of about 150,000 farms with an annual turnover of about US$750 million (euro625 million), officials said.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Bangladesh culls 30,000 chickens after birds' death sparks bird flu fears

      DHAKA, March 22 (Reuters) - Bangladesh said on Thursday the H5N1 bird flu virus had been detected in poultry near the capital Dhaka.

      "Avian influenza virus has been detected in a poultry firm in Savar, 25 km from Dhaka," the information ministry said in a statement late on Thursday.

      "A special meeting of the (government's) council of advisers was held today with chief adviser of the interim government Dr. Fakhruddin Ahmed in the chair," it said.

      "The council was informed by the health, agriculture and livestock advisers that samples from the Savar poultry tested in the Bangladesh Livestock Research Institute and the National Institute of Animal Health in Bangkok showed the existence of the H5N1 virus."

      http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/DHA99541.htm

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Bangladesh - H5N1 in Poultry Farm

        Bird flu confirmed in Bangladesh <!-- Author --><!-- intro -->
        <!-- Filename : /templates/generic/includes/actionBarAfp.jsp --> <!-- Subtitle --><!-- Text -->Bangladesh confirmed Thursday its first case of bird flu, prompting mass culling of poultry at a farm outside the capital Dhaka, officials said.
        "The cabinet held a special meeting on Thursday afternoon after the health ministry confirmed that bird flu was detected at a poultry farm at Savar," government spokesman Syed Fahim Munaim said.
        The government earlier sent samples from poultry on the farm to the National Institute of Animal Health in Bangkok, which confirmed the presence of the deadly H5N1 strain of the virus.
        Bangladesh is home to hundreds of thousands of poultry farms which employ more than a million people.
        The head of the country's interim government, Fakhruddin Ahmed, chaired Thursday's cabinet meeting, which agreed to measures to prevent the spread of the disease in the South Asian country, home to 144 million people.
        "We've started culling birds at the infected farm and would now take special measures including restricting movement of birds within a 10-kilometre radius area to contain the disease," the spokesman said.
        Other measures include health checks on all workers who may have come into contact with the infected birds, he said.
        It is unclear how poultry became infected at the farm in Savar town about 40 kilometres (25 miles) west of Dhaka.
        The government released a statement urging residents to remain calm, saying only birds at the one farm had been infected.
        The virulent H5N1 virus has killed at least 169 people across the world since late 2003 through contact with infected birds, according to the World Health Organisation.
        "The government would like to assure (everyone) that there is no reason for any panic or concern. In fact, poultry birds and eggs can be consumed as usual through normal cooking, according to experts," it said.
        A control centre has been opened to oversee the culling and carrying out of the virus containment measures, it said.
        Bangladesh had already banned imports of live birds from more than 50 countries including neighbouring India and Myanmar after outbreaks were detected there.
        Bangladesh is the world's most densely populated country, and hundreds of its doctors have been trained by the World Health Programme in the event that humans contracted the virus.
        Scientists fear the virus could mutate into a form easily spread among humans, leading to a global pandemic with the potential to kill millions.

        http://www.france24.com/france24Publ...wdiq2&cat=null

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Bangladesh - H5N1 in Poultry Farm

          Bangladesh says detects bird flu in poultry
          Fri Mar 23, 2007 12:17 AM IST



          DHAKA (Reuters) - Bangladesh said on Thursday the H5N1 bird flu virus had been detected in poultry near the capital Dhaka.
          "Avian influenza virus has been detected in a poultry firm in Savar, 25 km from Dhaka," the information ministry said in a statement late on Thursday.
          "A special meeting of the (government's) council of advisers was held today with chief adviser of the interim government Dr. Fakhruddin Ahmed in the chair," it said.
          "The council was informed by the health, agriculture and livestock advisers that samples from the Savar poultry tested in the Bangladesh Livestock Research Institute and the National Institute of Animal Health in Bangkok showed the existence of the H5N1 virus."
          The virus was found in the birds from a poultry firm run by Bangladesh's National Airlines Biman, which has already culled 30,000 birds over the last few days.
          Biman officials had earlier denied the culling had any relation with bird flu. They were not immediately available on Thursday night for comment.
          Syed Abu Siddiq, secretary of Bangladesh Poultry Industries Association, said there were 125,000 small and big firms in the country, producing 250 million broilers and 6 billion eggs annually.
          He said some 40 million Bangladeshis were directly or indirectly associated with poultry farming.
          Last year Bangladesh banned imports of chickens and eggs from 25 countries in Europe and Asia, including India, after H5N1 virus had been found there.

          http://in.today.reuters.com/news/new...archived=False

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Bangladesh - H5N1 in Poultry Farm

            Commentary at

            http://www.recombinomics.com/News/03...angladesh.html

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Bangladesh - H5N1 in Poultry Farm

              Originally posted by niman View Post
              Commentary

              H5N1 in Bangladesh
              Recombinomics Commentary
              March 22, 2007


              Bangladesh confirmed Thursday its first case of bird flu, prompting mass culling of poultry at a farm outside the capital Dhaka, officials said.

              Bangladesh is home to hundreds of thousands of poultry farms which employ more than a million people

              The above comments confirm the detection of H5N1 in Bangladesh. Because of Bengladesh?s proximity to India, detection of H5N1 is not a surprise. Birds that migrate to Qinghai Lake in the spring winter in northern India. Although H5N1 was acknowledged last year in western India, there have been no confirmed cases in the wild birds that migrate to Qinghai Lake. This year media reports described the detection of bird flu in northeastern India, but those reports were not officially confirmed.

              The presence of H5N1 in Bangladesh may provide of view of H5N1 in northeastern India. The sequences reported last year in India were the Qinghai strain, although the HA was distinct from previously described Qinghai sequences, and the NA sequence was not Qinghai, indicating the H5N1 reported in India were reassortants, signally dual infections and significant levels of H5N1.

              H5N1 in Bangladesh is also a cause for concern because it is the most densely populated country in the world and has a significant poultry population.


              .


              "The next major advancement in the health of American people will be determined by what the individual is willing to do for himself"-- John Knowles, Former President of the Rockefeller Foundation

              Comment


              • #8
                Bangladesh: Bird flu detected. Poultry

                Bird Flu Detected in Burma's Neighbor

                http://www.narinjara.com/details.asp?id=1194

                Bird flu has been detected in a poultry farm on the outskirts of Dhaka in Bangladesh, a close neighbor of the military ruled Burma, officials report.

                Advisor for Health and Family Welfare Major General (retired) ASM Matiur Rahman, and Advisor for Agriculture, Fisheries and Livestock Dr. CS Karim informed Bangladesh high government officials that the avian influenza virus has recently been detected in a poultry farm in Savar of Dhaka.

                However, poultry birds infected with H5N1 strain have not been detected in the country outside of the Savar area, the official said.

                "The Bangladesh government would like to assure that there is no reason for any panic or concern. In fact, poultry birds and eggs can be consumed as usual through normal cooking," experts stated in the official announcement.

                This is the first time the bird flu has been detected in Bangladesh and the authorities have taken necessary action to prevent the spread of the virus to the rest of the country.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Bangladesh: Bird flu detected. Poultry

                  Bird Flu Reaches Bangladesh, Kills Poultry Near Dhaka (Update2)

                  (Adds comment from UN agency official in fourth paragraph.)

                  By Ashok Bhattacharjee
                  March 23 (Bloomberg) -- Bangladesh reported its first
                  outbreak of bird flu after the H5N1 strain of the virus killed
                  chickens on farms near Dhaka, the world's 10th largest city.
                  Laboratories in Dhaka and Bangkok confirmed the diagnosis,
                  Syed Fahim Munaim, a spokesman for Bangladesh's Chief Adviser,
                  said today. Veterinary officials are conducting surveillance
                  within a 1 kilometer (0.6 miles) radius of the infected farms at
                  Savar, an industrial zone on the outskirts of the capital. Dhaka
                  has about 13 million people.
                  The outbreak makes Bangladesh the 57th country to report an
                  infection in birds since 2003. Diseased birds increase the risk
                  of human infection and provide chances for H5N1 to mutate into a
                  form that's as contagious to people as seasonal flu.
                  ``As long as birds remain infected, there is a risk of
                  human infection,'' Gregory Hartl, a spokesman for the World
                  Health Organization in Geneva, said in a telephone interview
                  today. He said the risk to people is small ``because human
                  infection is rare.''
                  The H5N1 virus has struck at least 281 people in a dozen
                  countries since late 2003, according to the WHO. Sixty percent
                  of cases were fatal. Scientists have said the virus might kill
                  millions if it were to spread easily among people.
                  Almost all human H5N1 cases have been linked with close
                  contact with sick or dead birds, such as children playing with
                  them or adults butchering them or plucking feathers, according
                  to the Geneva-based WHO.
                  ``The more majority of all instances of human infection
                  have occurred because of contact with so-called backyard
                  poultry'' in developing countries, Hartl said.

                  Among Asia's Poorest

                  Bangladesh, with a population of about 150 million, is one
                  of Asia's poorest. According to the Human Development Report
                  2006, it was ranked 137th out of 177 countries based on a
                  composite of measures that include life expectancy, adult
                  literacy and education as well as income. East Timor and Nepal
                  were the only other countries in Asia to rank lower.
                  Bangladeshi officials culled some birds in the affected
                  area to control the viruses spread, Munaim said. He was unable
                  to say how many fowl were destroyed.
                  State officials are scheduled to hold a press conference in
                  Dhaka at 4 p.m. local time today.

                  --Editor: J. Gale

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Bangladesh - H5N1 in Poultry Farm

                    A ProMED-mail post
                    <http://www.promedmail.org>
                    ProMED-mail is a program of the
                    International Society for Infectious Diseases
                    <http://www.isid.org>
                    Bangladesh, 1st case suspected

                    ******
                    [1] Bangladesh, 1st case suspected
                    Date: Thu 22 Mar 2007
                    From: Mary Marshall <tropical.forestry@btinternet.com>
                    Source: Reuters Alertnet [edited]
                    <http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/L22401264.htm>

                    Bangladesh says detects bird flu in poultry
                    -------------------------------------------
                    Bangladesh said on Thursday [22 Mar 2007] the H5N1 bird flu virus had
                    been detected in poultry near the capital Dhaka.
                    "Avian influenza virus has been detected in a poultry firm in Savar,
                    25 km from Dhaka," the information ministry said in a statement late
                    on Thursday [22 Mar 2007].
                    "A special meeting of the (government's) council of advisers was held
                    today [22 Mar 2007] with chief adviser of the interim government Dr.
                    Fakhruddin Ahmed in the chair," it said.
                    "The council was informed by the health, agriculture and livestock
                    advisers that samples from the Savar poultry tested in the Bangladesh
                    Livestock Research Institute and the National Institute of Animal
                    Health in Bangkok showed the existence of the H5N1 virus."
                    The virus was found in the birds from a poultry firm run by
                    Bangladesh's National Airlines Biman, which has already culled 30 000
                    birds over the last few days.
                    Biman officials had earlier denied the culling had any relation with
                    bird flu. They were not immediately available on Thursday [22 Mar
                    2007] night for comment.
                    Syed Abu Siddiq, secretary of Bangladesh Poultry Industries
                    Association, said there were 125 000 small and big firms in the
                    country, producing 250 million broilers and 6 billion eggs annually.
                    He said some 40 million Bangladeshis were directly or indirectly
                    associated with poultry farming.
                    Last year [2006], Bangladesh banned imports of chickens and eggs from
                    25 countries in Europe and Asia, including India, after H5N1 virus
                    had been found there.
                    --
                    ProMED-mail


                    [If officially confirmed and duly notified, Bangladesh will become
                    the 61st OIE-member on the list of countries infected with H5N1 since
                    the start of the panzootic at the end of 2003. An interactive map,
                    showing all ongoing and resolved H5N1 outbreaks (records also in the
                    Indian subcontinent) is available at
                    <http://www.oie.int/wahid-prod/public.php>.
                    Official confirmation (or otherwise) of the 1st outbreak in this
                    country is anticipated soon. - Mod.AS]</promed@promedmail.org></tropical.forestry@btinternet.com>
                    "In the beginning of change, the patriot is a scarce man (or woman https://flutrackers.com/forum/core/i...ilies/wink.png), and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for it then costs nothing to be a patriot."- Mark TwainReason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it. -Thomas Paine

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Bangladesh - H5N1 in Poultry Farm

                      Bird flu spreads to more farms in Bangladesh
                      Fri Mar 23, 2007 7:08 PM IST



                      DHAKA (Reuters) - Bird flu has spread to six poultry farms near Bangladesh's capital, the government said on Friday, sparking a nationwide alert.
                      The United Nations also expressed concern.
                      C.S. Karim, the government adviser for agriculture and livestock, said among more than 42,400 poultry on the six farms in Savar, over 12,000 had died and another 21,000 had been culled over the past few days.
                      The H5N1 avian flu virus has not spread to other areas of the country and there was no cause for panic, he told a news conference. Savar is 25 km north of the capital.
                      Dr. Duangvadee Sungkhobol, representative of U.N.'s World Health Organisation in Dhaka, said: "We are very concerned because this is a highly densely populated country where people, animals and poultry live very close".
                      "The government has taken aggressive measures to stop the spread of the disease and that WHO has confidence it (the government) would be able to limit the spread," she told the same news conference.
                      The disease was confirmed through tests by laboratories in Bangladesh and Thailand, the government said late on Thursday.
                      Another U.N. official also expressed concern.
                      "Maybe the outbreak of avian flu started in the country weeks or months before but the authorities took a long time to confirm it."
                      "We are talking to the government and relevant agencies to find out the extent of the spread of H5N1 in Bangladesh," the official said on Friday. They asked not to be identified.
                      Health experts had long expected an outbreak of H5N1 because the country is surrounded by India and Myanmar, which have reported bird flu infections.
                      Myanmar reported another outbreak of bird flu on Wednesday, saying a chicken farm had been hit outside the capital, where the H5N1 virus reappeared in four areas last month.
                      Bangladesh's dense population and large numbers of backyard poultry also increased the risks of outbreaks, experts have said.
                      The government has banned transport of poultry from affected areas, imposed constant monitoring of poultry farms across the country by joint forces led by the army and health checks on people working on the farms, Karim said.
                      "We have put the health network across the country on high alert and kept one specialised hospital ready to face any emergency," the government's health adviser, retired army major-general A.S.M. Matiur Rahman, said.
                      Syed Abu Siddiq, secretary of the Bangladesh Poultry Industries Association, said there were 125,000 small and large poultry firms in the country, producing 250 million broilers and 6 billion eggs annually.
                      Annual turnover was $750 million, he said.
                      About four million Bangladeshis were directly or indirectly associated with poultry farming.

                      http://in.today.reuters.com/news/new...a-292067-1.xml

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Bangladesh: Chicken farmers protest bird flu cull

                        Chicken farmers protest bird flu cull

                        From correspondents in Dhaka
                        March 24, 2007 09:59pm

                        Article from: Agence France-Presse
                        <!-- END Story Header Block -->

                        <!-- END Story Toolbar --> <!-- Lead Content Panel --> WORKERS at a state-run poultry farm near the Bangladesh capital have protested at the culling of chickens infected by the H5N1 virus, forcing authorities to call in the army to carry out the slaughter.

                        The farm at Jirani Bazar, 30km north of Dhaka, is one of six where the avian flu was detected in the past few days, prompting authorities to order mass culling to stop the disease spreading across the densely populated nation.
                        But employees opposed the measure, saying their livelihood was at threat.


                        ?We cannot let this burning to go ahead,? said Jannatul Ferdous.

                        ?If the birds go, we will starve to death,? she said.


                        Other workers stood outside the gates of the small farm, chanting slogans: ?go away, don't kill the birds?.


                        Farm offiical Mahbubur Rashid said troops were called later to complete the culling of birds.


                        Nearly 38,000 poultry birds have been culled in the six infected farms over the last few days after about 12,000 had died from the disease, officials from the livestock ministry said.


                        All poultry in farms and household within a square kilometre of the infected farms would be killed, the ministry said.


                        ?The Government is very much determined to ensure that the deadly virus does not travel farther,? a Government official said.


                        The H5N1 avian flu virus has not spread to other areas of the country and there was no cause for panic, the Government has said.


                        Health experts had expected an outbreak of H5N1 because the country is surrounded by India and Myanmar, which have reported bird flu infections
                        Bangladesh's dense population and large numbers of backyard poultry also increased the risks of outbreaks, experts have said.


                        The Government has banned transport of poultry from affected areas, imposed constant monitoring of poultry farms across the country by joint forces led by the army and health checks on people working on the farms.


                        Additional reporting by Azad Majumder and Masud Karim


                        http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599...-38197,00.html
                        "In the beginning of change, the patriot is a scarce man (or woman https://flutrackers.com/forum/core/i...ilies/wink.png), and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for it then costs nothing to be a patriot."- Mark TwainReason obeys itself; and ignorance submits to whatever is dictated to it. -Thomas Paine

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Bangladesh - H5N1 Spreads to 6 poultry farms

                          Hat-tip, treyfish!

                          Taking chicken, eggs safe despite bird flu, say experts: Tk 7,000cr poultry sector under threat
                          By Staff Reporter
                          Sat, 24 Mar 2007

                          In the wake of detection of deadly avian influenza (H5N1) or bird flu virus in several chicken farms in the outskirts of capital Dhaka, the Tk 7,000 crore poultry industry now faces grave threat.

                          The government has already confirmed the detection of bird flu at several poultry firms at Savar, Gazipur and Narayanganj, and taken measures to stop spread the disease.

                          The bird flu was first appeared at Biman Poultry Farm sometime in the third week of February.

                          The outbreak was first learnt on March 21 last when Biman culled 30,000 chickens in its poultry farms at Ganakbari, Savar for fear of the killer disease.

                          Two state-run and many private laboratories have separately confirmed the viral disease, which is highly contagious for chickens and deadly for humans. The government also sent samples to Thailand for a laboratory test where the findings were confirmed.

                          The disease also affected 13 other private poultry farms in Kashimpur and Sreepur in Gazipur, not far from the Biman Poultry Complex.

                          Health adviser Maj Gen (retd) Motiur Rahman said the government agencies took urgent steps soon after the detection of bird flu at the firms.

                          Agriculture and Livestock Adviser Dr CS Karim said the urgent steps included culling and burning of thousands of chickens at affected farms in Dhaka, Savar, Gazipur and Narayanganj.

                          More than 36,000 poultry birds were culled overnight as intensive countrywide monitoring was underway against bird flu spread.

                          ?Containment of the situation is our prime task right this moment,? Adviser Dr Karim told a press briefing yesterday.

                          The adviser said livestock officials in the past two days inspected 810 poultry farms across Bangladesh but the infliction apparently remained concentrated on the six ranches within one kilometre radius of the Biman Bangladesh?s poultry farm in Savar, where the outbreak was first reported.

                          Deputy commissioners were asked to carryout intensive inspection of poultry farms while troops were called out to assist police in the task while authorities have decided to continue the exercise for at least next 45 days.

                          There are some 1,30,000 large, medium and small poultry farms in the country where some 35 to 40 lakh people are employed. These farms have invested some Tk 6,000 crore and have an annual turnover of Tk 7,000 crore. These farms provides 600 crore of eggs and 25 crore of broiler chickens, each weighing 1300-1500 grams, annually, industry sources said.

                          However, according to livestock department statistics, the number of registered poultry farms is 52,000 while non-registered ones total 1,52,000 having an estimated 20 crore poultry birds.

                          Officials said directly four lakh people were dependent on the estimated 2 billion dollar poultry industry, growing at a rate of about 60 percent.

                          Dr CS Karim said ?the compensation process will follow automatically? although no modalities were fixed yet for compensation of the affected poultry farm owners.

                          The Agriculture, Livestock and Health Ministries opened round the clock control rooms to monitor the developments as the government yesterday ordered a series of steps including health examination of people at inflicted poultry farms.

                          International bodies including World Health Organisation (WHO), UNICEF and Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) joined the campaign pledging technical and financial supports in facing the deadly phenomenon, which so far killed 169 people and attacked 281 others in 60 countries in the latest bird flu outbreak.

                          Health Adviser (Retd) Maj Gen Matiur Rahman said no human case of avian influenza was reported. Bangladesh has preparedness to detect and treat flu victims at the Chest Diseases Hospital in Mohakhali, he said.

                          Rahman said preparations were underway from two years ago when National Avian Influenza Human Pandemic Influenza Preparedness and Response Plan Bangladesh 2006-2008 was formulated and a large number of doctors were trained to identify flu victims.

                          http://nation.ittefaq.com/artman/pub...le_34945.shtml
                          ...when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth. - Sherlock Holmes

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Bangladesh - H5N1 Spreads to 6 poultry farms

                            Warden Message, March 23, 2007
                            Warden Message
                            The Bangladesh Government has confirmed that there has been an outbreak of avian influenza in Savar, on the outskirts of Dhaka. The government announced that they will cull poultry in that area. There are no reported cases of human illness.

                            The U.S. Embassy reminds all citizens that the U.S. Department of State has a website on avian influenza, at http://www.travel.state.gov/travel/...ealth_1181.html. We encourage Americans resident in Bangladesh to familiarize themselves with this fact sheet, and use the links to other U.S. Government websites for more information.

                            The U.S. Embassy in Dhaka can be reached at (880-2) 885-5500 during regular hours and for after-hours emergencies. Our website address is dhaka.usembassy.gov. For the latest security information, Americans living and traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs Internet web site at http://travel.state.gov, where the current Worldwide Caution Public Announcement, Bangladesh Public Announcement, Bangladesh Consular Information Sheet and other Public Announcements and Travel Warnings can be found. Up-to-date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the U.S. and Canada; or, for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 am to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

                            U.S. Embassy
                            Dhaka, Bangladesh
                            http://dhaka.usembassy.gov/warden_message_mar23_07.html


                            Edited to add: Thanks Treyfish for this post.

                            FT is now carrying Warden Messages in the Government and NGO forum

                            http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=965
                            <!-- / message --><!-- sig -->__________________
                            Last edited by sharon sanders; March 25, 2007, 08:42 PM. Reason: added message.
                            CSI:WORLD http://swineflumagazine.blogspot.com/

                            treyfish2004@yahoo.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Bangladesh - H5N1 Spreads to 6 poultry farms

                              Originally posted by Theresa42
                              The government has already confirmed the detection of bird flu at several poultry firms at Savar, Gazipur and Narayanganj, and taken measures to stop spread the disease.

                              The bird flu was first appeared at Biman Poultry Farm sometime in the third week of February.

                              The outbreak was first learnt on March 21 last when Biman culled 30,000 chickens in its poultry farms at Ganakbari, Savar for fear of the killer disease.

                              Two state-run and many private laboratories have separately confirmed the viral disease, which is highly contagious for chickens and deadly for humans. The government also sent samples to Thailand for a laboratory test where the findings were confirmed.

                              The disease also affected 13 other private poultry farms in Kashimpur and Sreepur in Gazipur, not far from the Biman Poultry Complex.
                              Thought it might be time for a map or two....

                              Savar is a sub-district within Dhaka District. Dhaka City is also within Dhaka District -- which is, in turn, within Dhaka Division.

                              Gazipur and Narayanganj are two other districts within the Dhaka Division.

                              This Biman Poultry Farms where the outbreak seems to have started is in Ganakbari, Savar sub-district, Dhaka District (see 1st map below).

                              Kashimpur and Sreepur are in Gazipur District which borders on Dhaka District in part adjacent to Savar sub-district -- i.e. Gazipur is just northeast of Savar -- and Kashimpur specifically borders directly on Savar (so Kashimpur is very close to Ganakbari). Kashimpur (area) and Sreepur (city & area) are on the 2nd map below.

                              Narayanganj District is east of Dhaka District and southeast of Gazipur District (3rd map).

                              Click image for larger version

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                              ...when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth. - Sherlock Holmes

                              Comment

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