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US - New Antibiotic-Resistant 'Superbug' an Emerging Threat, CDC Says - CRE

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  • US - New Antibiotic-Resistant 'Superbug' an Emerging Threat, CDC Says - CRE

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Healthcare Settings

    CRE, which stands for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, are a family of germs that are difficult to treat because they have high levels of resistance to antibiotics. Klebsiella species andEscherichia coli (E. coli) are examples of Enterobacteriaceae, a normal part of the human gut bacteria, that can become carbapenem-resistant. Types of CRE are sometimes known as KPC (Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase) and NDM (New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase). KPC and NDM are enzymes that break down carbapenems and make them ineffective. Both of these enzymes, as well as the enzyme VIM (Verona Integron-Mediated Metallo-β-lactamase) have also been reported in Pseudomonas.

    Healthy people usually do not get CRE infections ? they usually happen to patients in hospitals, nursing homes, and other healthcare settings. Patients whose care requires devices like ventilators (breathing machines), urinary (bladder) catheters, or intravenous (vein) catheters, and patients who are taking long courses of certain antibiotics are most at risk for CRE infections.
    Some CRE bacteria have become resistant to most available antibiotics. Infections with these germs are very difficult to treat, and can be deadly?one report cites they can contribute to death in up to 50% of patients who become infected.


    Tracking CRE Infections - CDC


    New Antibiotic-Resistant 'Superbug' an Emerging Threat, CDC Says

    Evidence of CRE found in seven U.S. cities monitored by researchers

    MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A relatively new antibiotic-resistant bacteria called CRE is making inroads in some major American cities, U.S. health officials report.

    Surveillance of seven U.S. metropolitan areas found higher-than-expected levels of CRE in Atlanta, Baltimore and New York City, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Lower-than-expected levels were found in Albuquerque, Denver and Portland, Ore., while the Minneapolis rate was what the agency anticipated.
    But CDC researchers were dismayed that they found active cases of CRE infection in every city they examined, said senior author Dr. Alexander Kallen, a CDC medical officer.

    The results support the CDC's decision to promote coordinated regional efforts to prevent the spread of CRE and other antibiotic-resistant germs, Kallen said.

    MORE:
    ?Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights ? that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~
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