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The Lancet Infect Dis. Highly drug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky ST198-X1: a microbiological study

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  • The Lancet Infect Dis. Highly drug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky ST198-X1: a microbiological study

    [Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, full text: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]
    The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Early Online Publication, 28 May 2013

    doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70124-5

    Highly drug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky ST198-X1: a microbiological study

    Original Text


    Simon Le Hello PharmD a, Dorothée Harrois PharmD a, Brahim Bouchrif PhD b, Lucile Sontag BSc a, Dalèle Elhani PhD a, Véronique Guibert a, Khalid Zerouali MD c, Dr François-Xavier Weill MD a


    Summary

    Background

    Salmonella enterica is a major global food-borne pathogen, causing life-threatening infections. Ciprofloxacin and extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) are the drugs of choice for severe infections. We previously reported a ciprofloxacin-resistant S enterica serotype Kentucky (S Kentucky) ST198-X1 strain that emerged in Egypt and spread throughout Africa and the Middle East from 2002 to 2008. We aimed to monitor recent trends in the location of transmission and antimicrobial resistance of this strain.


    Methods

    We analysed isolates of S Kentucky collected by the French national surveillance system for salmonellosis in France from Jan 1, 2000, to Dec 31, 2011, and at two sites in Casablanca, Morocco, between Jan 1, 2003, and Dec 31, 2011. We analysed patterns of travel of patients infected with a ciprofloxacin-resistant strain of S Kentucky. We identified isolates showing resistance to ESCs or decreased susceptibility to carbapenems, characterised isolates by XbaI-pulsed field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing, and assessed mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial drugs.


    Findings

    954 (1%) of 128 836 serotyped Salmonella spp isolates in France were identified as S Kentucky, as were 30 (13%) of 226 Salmonella spp isolates from Morocco. During 2000—08, 200 (40%) of 497 subculturable isolates of S Kentucky obtained in France were resistant to ciprofloxacin, compared with 376 (83%) of 455 isolates in 2009—11, suggesting a recent increase in ciprofloxacin resistance in France. Travel histories suggested S Kentucky infections originated predominantly in east Africa, north Africa, west Africa, and the Middle East, but also arose in India. We report several occurrences of acquisition of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (CTX-M-1, CTX-M-15), plasmid-encoded cephalosporinase (CMY-2), or carbapenemase (OXA-48, VIM-2) genes by ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates of S Kentucky ST198-X1 from the Mediterranean area since 2009. Many of these highly drug-resistant isolates were also resistant to most aminoglycosides, to co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole), and to azithromycin.


    Interpretation

    The potential risk to public health posed by ciprofloxacin-resistant S Kentucky ST198-X1 warrants its inclusion in national programmes for the control of S enterica in food-producing animals, in particular in poultry.


    Funding

    Institut Pasteur, Institut de Veille Sanitaire, Fondation pour la Recherche Médicale, French Government Investissement d'Avenir programme.
    ________

    a Institut Pasteur, Unité des Bactéries Pathogènes Entériques, Centre National de Référence des Escherichia coli, Shigella et Salmonella, WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Salmonella, Paris, France; b Institut Pasteur du Maroc, Sécurité Alimentaire et Environnement, Casablanca, Morocco; c Laboratoire de Microbiologie, CHU Ibn Rochd, Casablanca, Morocco
    Correspondence to: Dr François-Xavier Weill, Centre National de Référence des Escherichia coli, Shigella et Salmonella, Unité des Bactéries Pathogènes Entériques, Institut Pasteur, 28 rue du docteur Roux, 75724 Paris Cedex 15, France

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