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  • Birds not to blame for spread of Influenza A/H1N1

    http://www.abc.es/20100120/sociedad-...001201157.html


    REUTERS
    All about influenza A in special ABC.es

    EP | MADRID Updated Mi?rcoles, 20-01-10 at 12: 20

    The birds were not involved in the spread of influenza pandemics of 1918 and 2009, suggests a study by the Center for Foreign Animal Diseases of the National Agency Canadian Food Inspection Agency in Winnipeg, which is published in the journal 'Journal of General Virology '.
    The two strains of H1N1 influenza virus responsible for the global pandemics of 1918 and 2009 do not cause disease in birds. Survey results also show that birds are unlikely to participate in the expansion of the H1N1 virus in these pandemics.
    The researchers injected the virus H1N1 strains of 2009 and 1918 individually to poultry. None developed symptoms of influenza or showed any signs of damage to tissues until 18 days later, although half of the birds developed antibodies against the 1918 H1N1 virus showing a limited infection.
    The H1N1 virus of Spanish flu in 1918 also caused disease in ducks. The origin of this virus is unknown despite their genetic similarity to the avian flu, the results of this study show that it is unlikely to have jumped the species barrier from birds to humans.


    No need to sacrifice

    According explains Shawn Babiuk, Study, "discovering how the major human pandemic flu virus affecting birds and other species of domestic animals is crucial to discover what role, if any, can play these on the spread of viruses between the human population. " Works like this can provide information to governments to respond to outbreaks of influenza in birds that have strong implications for the poultry producers.
    "These findings support the use of normal veterinary practice management on birds infected with H1N1 flu pandemic in 2009 and show that the quarantine and culling are not necessary," says Babiuk. As indicated by the researcher, the virus may behave unpredictably. "Our understanding of how flu viruses evolve to cause pandemics remains limited. Although our research indicates that birds are unlikely to take part in the spread of pandemic viruses of 1918 and 2009, could participate in future pandemics," Babiuk concludes.

  • #2
    Re: Birds not to blame for spread of Influenza A/H1N1

    distance of 1918-flu to the bird index: 8,7,10,-,9,-,4,5

    H5N1-genotype Z (~2001) : 3,6,7,-,5,-,11,12
    Indonesia/2007 : 9,6,15,-,6,-,22,22

    6 amino-acid mutations per year, 7 years for birds in 1918.
    The 1918 virus may not infect birds, but ancestors some years
    prior to 1918 may well do.


    as for 2009, we have several outbreaks in turkeys
    and had several outbreaks earlier with triple-reasortant
    swine-flu.
    And there were the South-Dakota mallards and pintails in 2007
    with swine triple-reassortant viruses almost unchanged since 1998
    I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
    my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Birds not to blame for spread of Influenza A/H1N1

      Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0119213039.htm

      1918 and 2009 H1N1 Flu Probably Not Spread by Birds

      ScienceDaily (Jan. 20, 2010) ? The two strains of the H1N1 influenza virus responsible for the 1918 and 2009 global flu pandemics do not cause disease in birds. The results of the study, published in the February issue of the Journal of General Virology, also show it is unlikely that birds played a role in the spread of the H1N1 virus in these pandemics.

      Scientists from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease (NCFAD) in Winnipeg, Canada, together with collaborators in the USA, injected the 2009 and 1918 H1N1 virus strains individually into chickens. None developed flu symptoms or showed any signs of tissue damage up to18 days later, although about half the chickens developed antibodies against the 1918 H1N1 virus showing limited infection. The 1918 H1N1 virus also did not cause disease in ducks. The origin of the 1918 H1N1 virus is unknown and despite its genetic similarity to avian influenzas, the results of this study show it is unlikely to have jumped the species barrier from chickens to humans.

      Different strains of influenza cause disease in humans, birds and pigs; each type of virus is adapted to cause infection in its host. All cause similar respiratory symptoms. If flu viruses are passed back and forth between hosts (e.g. through close human contact with infected animals) the mixing can lead to development of a novel strain. As they have not encountered the virus before, the human population has little or no immunity to a novel strain which can easily cause infection and spread from person to person. This may ultimately lead to a global flu pandemic.

      Dr Shawn Babiuk, a scientist with the National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease who led the research, said, "Working out how major human pandemic flu viruses affect birds and other domestic animal species is crucial in discovering what role, if any, they play in spreading viruses in the human population." Such studies can inform government decisions in responding to outbreaks of influenza in birds, which have major implications for poultry producers. According to Dr Babiuk, "These findings support the use of normal veterinary management practices in poultry infected with pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza and demonstrate that quarantining and culling infected stocks is not necessary."

      Dr Babiuk explained that viruses can behave unpredictably. "Our understanding of exactly how influenza viruses go on to cause pandemics is still limited," he said. "Although our research indicates that birds are unlikely to have played a part in the spread of the 1918 and latest 2009 H1N1 pandemic viruses, they may well still play a part in future pandemics."

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Birds not to blame for spread of Influenza A/H1N1

        try turkeys
        I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
        my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

        Comment

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