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  • Norway - Fatal dog illness keeps spreading

    Fatal dog illness keeps spreading

    September 6, 2019

    Norwegian veterinary authorities fear a mysterious and potentially fatal dog illness is spreading quickly around the country. Several hundred dogs are believed to have been infected and even died before their owners could them to a vet.

    Cases of dogs suddenly suffering bloody diarrhea and vomiting blood first started being registered in the Oslo area. Then cases occurred north in Trøndelag and to the east in Hedmark, with more now coming to light in Rogaland and Aurland in Sogn og Fjordane in Western Norway.
    ...
    The illness has affected many types of dogs of all ages and it sets in swiftly. Dog owners have reported that their pets have been fine in the morning, and extremely ill in the afternoon. All dog owners are being urged to get their sick pets to a veterinarian as quickly as possible to begin intravenous treatment.
    ...
    As more cases were reported this Friday in Moss, Hønefoss and around Romerike, authorities haven’t yet been able to find a link. They were hoping to get coordinated results soon of tests conducted on both sick and dead dogs after several including Lexi have been sent for autopsy.
    ...

    https://www.newsinenglish.no/2019/09...lness-spreads/
    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

  • #2
    Serious illness in dogs

    Published 06.09.2019 Modified 06.09.2019

    In recent weeks, several veterinarians have treated dogs with severe diarrhea. The cause of the cases is not known, but the Norwegian Food Safety Authority recommends that dog owners restrict the close contact between dogs and keep dogs on a leash so that they are controlled.

    Update Friday, 6th September:

    Autopsy of the first three dogs has so far not provided an answer to the reason for the death of these three dogs, but the Norwegian Veterinary Institute reports that all had clear signs of serious bowel disease.

    The Food Safety Authority is still looking widely for possible causes, such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. So far, there are no signs that the animals have been poisoned by known substances.

    The Norwegian Food Safety Authority, together with the Norwegian Veterinary Institute, will continue to work on mapping the disease outbreak with information from autopsies, samples from sick dogs and obtaining in-depth information from relevant dog owners. For the time being, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority's advice on restricting close contact between dogs remains valid.

    The general condition of several of the dogs has deteriorated rapidly, some have been vomiting and some of the dogs have died.

    The Norwegian Food Safety Authority does not currently know what have caused the symptoms, as studies so far have not provided definite answers as to what may be the cause of the disease.

    The Norwegian Food Safety Authority first received information about the disease cases from veterinarians in the Oslo area, and has since also received information on dogs with similar symptoms in other parts of the country. At present there is no basis to say whether the cases are related.

    The Norwegian Food Safety Authority, together with the Norwegian Veterinary Institute, the Small Animal Clinic at NMBU (Norwegian Veterinary College) and the animal clinics will try to find the cause of the illness. Several dogs have been sampled and some of the dogs are autopsied. In addition, a questionnaire is sent out to relevant pet owners for more in-depth information. The Norwegian Food Safety Authority hopes these investigations will give some answers as to the cause of the disease as soon as possible.

    The Norwegian Food Safety Authority now generally recommends that dog owners restrict the close contact between dogs and keep dogs on a leash so that they are controlled. When dogs are walked, they should not greet the dogs they meet for as long as the situation is unclear.

    Dogs showing signs of disease should be brought to the veterinarian as soon as possible. Dog owners should follow the vaccination routines recommended by veterinarians.

    The recommendation to avoid close contact with other dogs means that dog owners should make an independent assessment of whether they should attend dressage courses, exhibitions, hunting trials and the like, which entails closer gatherings of dogs until this matter is solved or new information has been published.

    Dog owners who are going to the veterinarian should also avoid close contact with other dogs, and in case of suspicion of serious illness, pet owners should contact the clinic before taking the dog in so that infection-reducing measures can be implemented by the clinic.

    The Norwegian Food Safety Authority has not been notified of cases of disease with similar symptoms in other animal species, and so far, there are no indications that this is something that can infect humans.

    https://www.mattilsynet.no/language/..._in_dogs.36035
    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela

    Comment


    • #3
      Translation Google

      Ongoing disease outbreaks in dogs

      Published 09.09.2019 Last modified 09.09.2019

      The Food Safety Authority's advice to dog owners

      Restrict close contact with other dogs.
      Dog collections should be avoided.
      Do not let the dog greet other dogs on tour.
      Avoid the dog sniffing a lot in the ditch where other dogs have been.
      If you notice bloody or sputtering diarrhea, vomiting and rapidly deteriorate the general condition of your dog, go to the vet quickly.
      Call your veterinarian before taking your dog with you to the clinic.
      Follow the vaccine recommendations of the veterinarian. For example, the parvovirus can cause severe intestinal inflammation.

      In recent weeks, several veterinarians have received dogs with severe diarrhea. The cause of the cases is not known, but the Norwegian Food Safety Authority recommends that dog owners restrict the close contact between dogs and keep dogs on leash so that they are controlled.

      In total, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has received information on illness cases with similar symptoms from Oslo, Akershus, Nordland, Vestfold, Aust-Agder, Hordaland, Møre og Romsdal, Trøndelag, Buskerud, Hedmark, Rogaland, Østfold, Sogn og Fjordane, Telemark.

      The Norwegian Food Safety Authority emphasizes that as far as we have an overview, there is no abnormal occurrence of these symptoms elsewhere than in the Oslo area.

      There is extensive work to systematize data on the sick dogs and to find any common features or connections between the cases.

      Specimens from dead dogs show findings of the two bacteria Providencia alcalifaciens and Clostridium perfringens .

      In addition to previous advice, dog owners with sick or dead dogs are encouraged to keep samples of what the dog has eaten for the past 14 days if possible, so that one can take samples of this if needed. Feeding is one of many possibilities being investigated, but we emphasize that we cannot conclude as to what is possibly the source of infection.

      In-depth informationLatest news

      Update Monday, September 9: Today , the Veterinary Institute has detected the bacterium Providencia alcalifaciens in two of the three dogs that were autopsy on Sunday September 8. In total, this bacterium has now been found in a total of eight dogs (seven autopsied and one live). In these three dogs, the bacterium Clostridium perfringens has not been detected, which may be due to the dogs being treated with antibiotics.

      Since Sunday, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has received four new reports on isolated cases of dogs with similar symptoms of disease. One of the dogs died before arriving at a veterinary clinic. The cases are from Oslo, Akershus and Sogn og Fjordane. In addition, we have received some messages about dogs with more moderate symptoms. It is important to remember that these symptoms are not uncommon in dogs. As far as we have an overview, there is no abnormal occurrence of the symptoms elsewhere than in the Oslo area.

      In addition to the autopsy of dogs, we receive samples from veterinary clinics and we actively go out to gather information on illness cases. There is extensive work to systematize data on the sick dogs and to find any common features or connections between the cases.

      We maintain our advice to dog owners to limit close contact between dogs and to keep dogs on leash so that they are controlled. Dogs showing signs of disease should be brought to the veterinarian as soon as possible.

      https://www.mattilsynet.no/dyr_og_dy...rudd_hos_hund/
      "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
      -Nelson Mandela

      Comment


      • #4
        Translation Google

        Acute dog disease September 2019 - we know this



        On this page you will find what we know at the moment about acute illness in dogs with severe diarrhea and impaired general condition. The site will be updated when we have new information to share.


        Last update with new information: September 9 at 3:30 pm

        The Veterinary Institute works actively with the Norwegian Food Safety Authority, NMBU Veterinary College, veterinarians and others to find links in the many cases of acute dog disease that have led to sick and dead dogs in the past.

        Latest news:
        • The Veterinary Institute on Monday detected the bacterium Providencia alcalifaciens in two of the three dogs that were autopsy yesterday Sunday, September 8. That is, this bacterium has been found in a total of seven dogs (six autopsied and one live). This provides valuable information for further work. The samples from a dog will be examined further for this bacterium.
        • In these three dogs, the bacterium Clostridium perfringens has not been detected .
        • The autopsy of two new dogs on Monday shows similar signs of illness with previous findings of autopsy with bloody gut.
        • A survey was sent out to collect and record information for analysis. SMS has been sent to 2,000 veterinarians across the country, while emails have been sent to the clinics. We ask the veterinarians to record all cases of symptoms such as bloody diarrhea, vomiting and a general condition of the dog since August 1 and on. The veterinarians must then contact the dog owner to answer the questionnaire well.
        • The Veterinary Institute is also interested in receiving samples from veterinarians who have patients with bloody enteritis, preferably before antibiotic treatment. Such submission is covered by the public.
        • The Veterinary Institute will welcome dead dogs for autopsy. The veterinarian must agree this with the Norwegian Food Safety Authority and the Veterinary Institute
        • See also news from Sunday, September 8: Intestinal inflammation and bacterial findings in several dogs
        • The Norwegian Food Safety Authority has since Sunday received four new reports on isolated cases of dogs with similar symptoms of disease. These cases are from Oslo, Akershus and Sogn og Fjordane. Two dogs come to the Veterinary Institute Monday for autopsy.
        • The Norwegian Food Safety Authority does not currently have documentation indicating abnormal occurrence of the symptoms elsewhere than in the Oslo area.
        • In addition to the advice that everything is out, we remind you how important it is to use dog bags for all dog owners. Updated advice for dog owners can be found on the website of the Norwegian Food Safety Authority.
        What do we do now

        Autopsies, laboratory analyzes and large amounts of information are collected, compared and compared with knowledge of animal diseases from home and abroad. It is sought systematically and broadly with the hope of being able to rule out some possible causes and finding relationships to pursue. This includes infectious agents such as bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites and algae as well as consequences of rainfall, temperature, poor water quality, etc. We also apply in previous cases at home and abroad. The symptoms of the disease are common in dogs, but we see an increase in August 2019 with more acute cases than before.

        We know this
        • The Norwegian Food Safety Authority has forwarded information to the Veterinary Institute on Sunday, September 8, on illness cases with similar symptoms from Nordland, Oslo, Vestfold, Aust-Agder, Hordaland, Møre og Romsdal, Trøndelag, Buskerud, Hedmark, Rogaland, Østfold, Sogn og Fjordane, Telemark and Akershus.
        • On Sunday morning, four new reports of isolated cases of dogs with similar symptoms of illness appeared. One of the dogs was killed due to the acute course of the disease and one died before coming to the veterinary clinic. The messages come from Møre and Romsdal, Vestfold, Buskerud and Nordland. Total figures for the number of dead or sick are uncertain figures.
        • Autopsy of the first three dogs shows clear signs of severe bowel disease. The pathologists observed a very bloody gut, and have eliminated the most common causes of bloody gut, such as a salmonella infection. Autopsies at the College of Veterinary Medicine show similar pathological findings. Read more here .
        • The autopsies at the Veterinary Institute and subsequent laboratory analyzes have detected two bacteria in abnormally large quantities. These bacteria are Clostridium perfringens and Providencia alcalifaciens .
        • The Veterinary Institute, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority and the Veterinary College have sent out a preliminary questionnaire to a limited number of cases in order to form a more precise, but at the same time broader and further distributed questionnaire. The new questionnaire will be sent to animal clinics and veterinarians on Sunday, September 8.
        • The number of dogs with similar symptoms increased from August 20, 2019. Animal clinics report more cases in August 2019 than the same month the year before. Several animal clinics are now being asked to help compare statistics.
        • The Public Health Institute and the Veterinary Institute have considered the possibility of a link between the outbreak of dogs and the ongoing outbreak of EHEC infection among humans. The two outbreaks are considered as two separate events. So far, there are no indications of infection with the same bacterium, and dog keeping does not appear as a common denominator among people who have become ill with EHEC infection. The geographical distribution of patients in the two outbreaks does not coincide either. A wide range of microbiological studies are also being worked on in dog samples, and EHEC is also included in the repertoire of studies.
        What can we now exclude?
        • Not only Oslo: Cases with similar symptoms have been reported from a number of counties across the country.
        • Not Salmonella : There is no evidence of Salmonella .
        • Not Campylobacter : Campylobacter has not been detected .
        • Not rat poison or similar. Based on the first autopsies of dead dogs, the Veterinary Institute will rule out rat poison and similar specific poisonings as a possible cause of death. The undamaged dogs do not have internal injuries that would be compatible with such poisoning. This exclusion does not include all types of toxins that may occur naturally
        Correction of rumors

        No invoice : No dog owner must pay for the autopsies that are now performed after consultation between the veterinarian, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority and the Veterinary Institute. An invoice is drawn from the appropriate animal clinic that apologizes for the error. This is now treated as a reportable illness which means that the Veterinary Institute, as part of the public, takes all costs with autopsy.
        No need to warn against specific feed products : In social media there are scattered accusations against named feed producers. The Veterinary Institute has no information that this brings about the correctness, on the contrary, we see a wide range of feed products in the material we have to date - which underscores the complexity of the case. Feed is just one of many different "traces" that are followed up, including water, fungi, parasites, bacteria and viruses, etc.

        News from the Veterinary Institute
        Here you will find an overview of media cases about acute dog disease.

        Advice for pet owners
        Contact your veterinarian about sick dogs

        Unfortunately we do not respond to inquiries from pet owners. If your dog is sick, contact your veterinarian.
        Press can contact Asle Haukaas , communications director at the Veterinary Institute.

        https://www.vetinst.no/dyr/smadyr/ak...9-dette-vet-vi


        "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
        -Nelson Mandela

        Comment


        • #5
          Translation Google

          Ongoing disease outbreaks in dogs
          ...
          Update on Tuesday, September 10: Since Monday, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has received one new report on a dog with similar symptoms of illness. The case is from Østfold. In addition, there have been fewer reports of dogs with more moderate symptoms.

          It is important to remember that these symptoms are not uncommon in dogs. As far as we have an overview so far, there is no abnormal occurrence of the symptoms elsewhere than in the Oslo area.

          The Veterinary Institute now believes that it can exclude some of the examination traces that have been followed. It is not likely that there is algae poisoning, there is no evidence of tick-borne illnesses and in addition, anthrax and harness plague (tularemia) are excluded. Campylobacter and salmonella were previously excluded.

          Today, a dog from Sogn and Fjordane has been autopsy, showing the same signs of bloody intestinal inflammation as the other cases. So far, there is no commonality between cases of sick dogs with regard to age, breed, feeding, contact with other dogs, walking areas and the like. The Norwegian Food Safety Authority works actively with the Veterinary Institute, the NMBU Veterinary College and veterinary clinics to obtain information on illness cases. There is extensive work to systematize data on the sick dogs and to find any common features or connections between the cases.

          Several dogs will be autopsied at the Veterinary Institute in the coming days, as well as sample material from sick dogs.

          The veterinary institute has detected the bacterium Providencia alcalifaciens in a total of nine dogs (eight autopsied and one live). The bacterium Clostridium perfringens has also been detected in several dogs.

          We maintain our advice to dog owners to limit close contact between dogs and to keep dogs on leash so that they are controlled. Dogs showing signs of disease should be brought to the veterinarian as soon as possible.

          https://www.mattilsynet.no/dyr_og_dy...rudd_hos_hund/
          "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
          -Nelson Mandela

          Comment


          • #6
            Translation Google

            Ongoing disease outbreaks in dogs
            ...

            Update on Wednesday, September 11: Since Tuesday, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has received five new reports on isolated cases of dogs with similar symptoms of disease. The cases are from Oslo, Telemark, Vest-Agder, Nordland and Finnmark. In addition, there have been fewer reports of dogs with more moderate symptoms.

            It is important to remember that these symptoms occur in dogs, but often with less acute course of disease. As far as we have an overview so far, there is no abnormal occurrence of the symptoms elsewhere than in the Oslo area.

            So far, there is no commonality between cases of sick dogs with regard to age, breed, feeding, contact with other dogs, walking areas and the like. The Norwegian Food Safety Authority works actively with the Veterinary Institute, the NMBU Veterinary College and veterinary clinics to obtain information on illness cases. There is extensive work to systematize data on the sick dogs and to find any common features or connections between the cases.

            Several dogs will be autopsied in the coming days, and in addition, sample material from sick dogs will be analyzed.

            The Veterinary Institute believes that it is possible to exclude some of the examination tracks that have been followed. It is not likely that there is algae poisoning, there is no evidence of tick-borne illnesses and in addition, anthrax and harness plague (tularemia) are excluded. Campylobacter and Salmonella are also excluded, along with rat poisoning and similar specific poisonings. This exclusion does not include all types of toxins that may occur naturally

            The Veterinary Institute has detected the bacterium Providencia alcalifaciens in a total of nine dogs (eight autopsied and one live). The bacterium Clostridium perfringens has also been detected in several dogs.

            The Norwegian Food Safety Authority maintains advice for dog owners to limit close contact between dogs and to keep dogs on leash so that they are controlled. Dogs showing signs of disease should be brought to the veterinarian as soon as possible.

            https://www.mattilsynet.no/dyr_og_dy...rudd_hos_hund/
            "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
            -Nelson Mandela

            Comment


            • #7
              Translation Google

              Ongoing disease outbreaks in dogs
              ...

              Update on Thursday, September 12: Since Wednesday, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has received eight new reports on isolated cases of dogs with similar symptoms of disease. One of the dogs has died. The cases are from Buskerud, Vestfold, Trøndelag, Nordland, Troms and Finnmark.

              It is important to remember that these symptoms occur in dogs, but often with less acute course of disease. Initially, there have been most reports of illness cases in the Oslo area.

              So far, there is no commonality between cases of sick dogs with regard to age, breed, feeding, contact with other dogs, walking areas and the like.The Norwegian Food Safety Authority works actively with the Veterinary Institute, the NMBU Veterinary College and veterinary clinics to obtain information on illness cases. There is extensive work to systematize data on the sick dogs and to find any common features or connections between the cases. So far, about 60 responses have been received to this questionnaire on cases of acute bloody diarrhea in dogs, which have been sent out to veterinarians. Preliminary assessment of these shows no connection between the cases that give a clear clue to follow in the investigation.

              It is positive that in most cases where several dogs live in the same animal breed, only one dog has become ill. This may indicate that a possible disease is not very contagious between dogs.

              Several dogs will be autopsied in the coming days, and in addition, sample material from sick dogs will be analyzed.

              The Veterinary Institute believes that it is possible to exclude some of the examination tracks that have been followed. It is not likely that there is algae poisoning, there is no evidence of tick-borne illnesses and in addition, anthrax and harness plague (tularemia) are excluded. Campylobacter and Salmonella are also excluded, along with rat poisoning and similar specific poisonings. This exclusion does not include all types of toxins that may occur naturally.

              The Veterinary Institute has detected the bacterium Providencia alcalifaciens in a total of nine dogs (eight autopsied and one live). The bacteria Clostridium perfringen s have also been detected in several of the dogs, without the Today can say something about this is the cause of the symptoms.

              The Veterinary Institute is now investigating the presence of the bacterium in samples from healthy dogs. This mapping of the normal situation has not been completed, but it seems that this bacterium occurs naturally in some healthy dogs. In the future, the Veterinary Institute will examine the Providencia bacteria to see if they belong to the same bacterial strain. This can clarify if the cases are linked in one outbreak, or if there are several individual cases we are notified of

              The Norwegian Food Safety Authority follows several clues in collaboration with the Veterinary Institute in the hope of resolving the many cases of sick and dead dogs lately. The discovery of the bacteria does not limit the Norwegian Food Safety Authority's broad efforts to exclude as many potential causes as the work progresses.

              The Norwegian Food Safety Authority maintains advice for dog owners to limit close contact between dogs and to keep dogs on leash so that they are controlled. Dogs showing signs of disease should be brought to the veterinarian as soon as possible.

              https://www.mattilsynet.no/dyr_og_dy...rudd_hos_hund/
              "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
              -Nelson Mandela

              Comment


              • #8
                Translation Google

                Ongoing disease outbreaks in dogs

                ...
                Update Friday, September 13: From Thursday to Friday, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has received one new report on a dog with similar symptoms of illness. The case is from Vestfold.

                It is important to remember that these symptoms occur in dogs, but often with less acute course of disease. Initially, there have been most reports of illness cases in the Oslo area.

                So far, there is no commonality between cases of sick dogs with regard to age, breed, feeding, contact with other dogs, walking areas and the like. The Norwegian Food Safety Authority works actively with the Veterinary Institute, the NMBU Veterinary College and veterinary clinics to obtain information on illness cases. There is extensive work to systematize data on the sick dogs and to find any common features or connections between the cases. So far, about 60 responses have been received to this questionnaire on cases of acute bloody diarrhea in dogs, which have been sent out to veterinarians. Preliminary assessment of these shows no connection between the cases that give a clear clue to follow in the investigation.

                It is positive that in most cases where several dogs live in the same animal breed, only one dog has become ill. This may indicate that a possible disease is not very contagious between dogs.

                There are 12 dogs, all showing the same signs of gut inflammation. Several dogs will be autopsied in the coming days, and in addition, sample material from sick dogs will be analyzed.

                The Veterinary Institute believes that it is possible to exclude some of the examination tracks that have been followed. It is not likely that there is algae poisoning, there is no evidence of tick-borne illnesses and in addition, anthrax and harness plague (tularemia) are excluded. Campylobacter and Salmonella are also excluded, along with rat poisoning and similar specific poisonings. This exclusion does not include all types of toxins that may occur naturally.

                The veterinary institute has detected the bacterium Providencia alcalifaciens in a total of ten dogs (nine autopsied and one live). The bacteria Clostridium perfringen s have also been detected in several of the dogs, without the Today can say something about this is the cause of the symptoms.

                The Veterinary Institute is now investigating the presence of the bacterium in samples from healthy dogs. This mapping of the normal situation has not been completed, but it seems that this bacterium occurs naturally in some healthy dogs. In the future, the Veterinary Institute will examine the Providencia bacteria to see if they belong to the same bacterial strain. This can clarify if the cases are linked in one outbreak, or if there are several individual cases we are notified of

                The Norwegian Food Safety Authority follows several clues in collaboration with the Veterinary Institute in the hope of resolving the many cases of sick and dead dogs lately. The discovery of the bacteria does not limit the Norwegian Food Safety Authority's broad efforts to exclude as many potential causes as the work progresses.

                The Norwegian Food Safety Authority maintains advice for dog owners to limit close contact between dogs and to keep dogs on leash so that they are controlled. Dogs showing signs of disease should be brought to the veterinarian as soon as possible.

                https://www.mattilsynet.no/dyr_og_dy...rudd_hos_hund/
                "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                -Nelson Mandela

                Comment


                • #9
                  Translation Google

                  Ongoing disease outbreaks in dogs
                  ...
                  Update Monday, September 16 (8pm): Since Friday, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority has received eight new reports on dogs with similar symptoms of disease. The cases are from Oslo, Akershus, Telemark, and Nordland.

                  These are cases that are reported directly to the Norwegian Food Safety Authority, and not as feedback via the survey sent to veterinarians. As of Friday, September 13, the ongoing survey of veterinarians shows 102 cases of bloody diarrhea of ​​varying severity, since August 1. The Norwegian Food Safety Authority expects more answers to this investigation in the days ahead.

                  It is important to remember that diarrhea is a fairly common symptom in dogs, but often with less acute illness and seriousness. It is not always contagious and the cases may not be interconnected. Therefore, all the reports of dogs with bloody diarrhea cannot be put into context until we know what the disease is actually caused by.

                  Preliminary assessments based on diagnostic statistics from veterinary clinics show that there has been a clear increase in cases of bloody diarrhea in the Central Eastern Region from approx. August 20 this year. This coincides with the preliminary results of the ongoing survey sent to veterinarians. Further work is being done to process information from the survey, while new answers are constantly coming in.

                  The Veterinary Institute and the Norwegian Food Safety Authority now believe that they can also exclude puppy disease, circovirus, coronavirus, yeast and mold fungus as probable causes of the disease. The Veterinary Institute has detected the bacterium Providencia alcalifaciens in one dog that was autopsy last Friday. Taken together, the Veterinary Institute has detected the bacteria in eleven dogs (ten autopsied and one live).

                  The Norwegian Food Safety Authority follows several clues in collaboration with the Veterinary Institute in the hope of finding the cause of the many cases of sick and dead dogs lately.

                  The Norwegian Food Safety Authority still recommends dog owners to limit close contact between dogs and to keep dogs on leash so that they are controlled.

                  We know this as far
                  As Friday, September 13, the ongoing survey (survey) among veterinarians shows 102 cases of bloody diarrhea of ​​varying severity, since August 1. Preliminary responses may indicate a recovery of disease cases with bloody diarrhea in dogs from ca. August 20 this year.

                  Currently, there are no common differences between cases of sick dogs with regard to age, breed, feeding, contact with other dogs, areas and the like.

                  Initial assessments showed that in most cases where several dogs live in the same animal breeding, only one dog has become ill. This may indicate that a possible disease is not very contagious between dogs.

                  The Veterinary Institute has obstructed 14 dogs, all of which show the same signs of gut inflammation. The bacterium Providencia alcalifaciens has been detected in a total of ten dogs (nine autopsied and one live). The bacterium Clostridium perfringens has also been detected in several dogs. At present, it is not possible to say if this is the cause of the symptoms.

                  The Veterinary Institute and the Norwegian Food Safety Authority believe that there are several possible reasons to exclude: Parvovirus, Giardia and Cryptosporidium parasites, anthrax, EHEC, harpest (tularemia), Campylobacter and Salmonella bacteria , rat poisoning and similar specific poisonings (not all types of toxins can be included) . Algae poisoning and tick-borne diseases are also unlikely.

                  https://www.mattilsynet.no/dyr_og_dy...rudd_hos_hund/
                  "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
                  -Nelson Mandela

                  Comment

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