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BMJ: Can online self-reports assist in real-time identification of influenza vaccination uptake? A cross-sectional study of influenza vaccine-related tweets in the USA, 2013-2017

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  • BMJ: Can online self-reports assist in real-time identification of influenza vaccination uptake? A cross-sectional study of influenza vaccine-related tweets in the USA, 2013-2017

    BMJ Open. 2019 Jan 15;9(1):e024018. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024018.
    Can online self-reports assist in real-time identification of influenza vaccination uptake? A cross-sectional study of influenza vaccine-related tweets in the USA, 2013-2017.

    Huang X1, Smith MC2, Jamison AM3, Broniatowski DA2, Dredze M4, Quinn SC3,5, Cai J6, Paul MJ1,6.
    Author information

    Abstract

    INTRODUCTION:

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) spend significant time and resources to track influenza vaccination coverage each influenza season using national surveys. Emerging data from social media provide an alternative solution to surveillance at both national and local levels of influenza vaccination coverage in near real time.
    OBJECTIVES:

    This study aimed to characterise and analyse the vaccinated population from temporal, demographical and geographical perspectives using automatic classification of vaccination-related Twitter data.
    METHODS:

    In this cross-sectional study, we continuously collected tweets containing both influenza-related terms and vaccine-related terms covering four consecutive influenza seasons from 2013 to 2017. We created a machine learning classifier to identify relevant tweets, then evaluated the approach by comparing to data from the CDC's FluVaxView. We limited our analysis to tweets geolocated within the USA.
    RESULTS:

    We assessed 1 124 839 tweets. We found strong correlations of 0.799 between monthly Twitter estimates and CDC, with correlations as high as 0.950 in individual influenza seasons. We also found that our approach obtained geographical correlations of 0.387 at the US state level and 0.467 at the regional level. Finally, we found a higher level of influenza vaccine tweets among female users than male users, also consistent with the results of CDC surveys on vaccine uptake.
    CONCLUSION:

    Significant correlations between Twitter data and CDC data show the potential of using social media for vaccination surveillance. Temporal variability is captured better than geographical and demographical variability. We discuss potential paths forward for leveraging this approach.
    Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.


    KEYWORDS:

    epidemiology; health informatics; public health; world wide web technology

    PMID: 30647040 DOI: 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024018
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