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Knowledge about influenza and adherence to the recommendations for influenza vaccination of pregnant women after an educational intervention in Greece

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  • Knowledge about influenza and adherence to the recommendations for influenza vaccination of pregnant women after an educational intervention in Greece

    Hum Vaccin Immunother. 2019 Jan 16. doi: 10.1080/21645515.2019.1568158. [Epub ahead of print]
    Knowledge about influenza and adherence to the recommendations for influenza vaccination of pregnant women after an educational intervention in Greece.

    Maltezou HC1, Koutroumanis P2, Kritikopoulou C2, Theodoridou K3, Katerelos P1, Tsiaousi I2, Rodolakis A2, Loutradis D2.
    Author information

    Abstract

    Pregnant women and young infants are at increased risk for influenza-associated severe disease, complications and hospitalizations. In Greece influenza vaccination during pregnancy remains extremely low. We studied the knowledge about influenza and the adherence to the recommendations for influenza vaccination of pregnant women following an educational intervention in a large maternity hospital. A standardized questionnaire was used. A knowledge score was calculated for each woman. A total of 304 pregnant women were studied [mean age: 31.5 years (standard deviation (SD): 5.4 years), mean gestational age: 27.8 weeks (SD: 9.6 weeks)]. Their mean knowledge score was 87%. Sixty pregnant women (19.5%) were vaccinated against influenza at a mean gestational age of 24.6 weeks (SD: 7.5 weeks). Multiple regression analysis revealed that previous influenza vaccination and information about the need to get vaccinated were the only significant factors associated with an increased probability for influenza vaccination during pregnancy (47% versus 17% in women with and without a history of influenza vaccination in the past, respectively; odds ratio = 3.6; p-value = 0.016, and 32% versus 4% in women informed compared to those uninformed about the need for vaccination during pregnancy, respectively; odds ratio = 17.8; p-value<0.001). Seventy women provided a reason for refusing influenza vaccination. "Fear of adverse events" (for them or the fetus) was the prevalent reason for refusing influenza vaccination (19 women; 27%), followed by the statements "influenza vaccination is not necessary" (13; 18.5%) and "not at risk to get influenza" (9; 13%). In conclusion, an educational intervention was associated with an influenza vaccination rate of 19.5% among pregnant women compared to <2% the past years. In order to improve vaccine uptake by pregnant women and protect them and their babies, more intensified interventions should be explored.


    KEYWORDS:

    Influenza vaccine; adherence; knowledge; pregnant women; vaccination rates

    PMID: 30650014 DOI: 10.1080/21645515.2019.1568158
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