Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Determinants of non-vaccination against seasonal influenza in Canadian adults: findings from the 2015-2016 Influenza Immunization Coverage Survey

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Determinants of non-vaccination against seasonal influenza in Canadian adults: findings from the 2015-2016 Influenza Immunization Coverage Survey

    Can J Public Health. 2018 Mar 30. doi: 10.17269/s41997-018-0018-9. [Epub ahead of print]
    Determinants of non-vaccination against seasonal influenza in Canadian adults: findings from the 2015-2016 Influenza Immunization Coverage Survey.

    Farmanara N1,2, Sherrard L3, Dubé È4, Gilbert NL3.
    Author information

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES:

    The study objectives were to (1) identify determinants of non-vaccination against seasonal influenza in Canadian adults and (2) examine self-reported reasons for non-vaccination.
    METHODS:

    The data source was the 2015-2016 Influenza Immunization Coverage Survey, a national telephone survey of Canadian adults. Participants (n = 1950) were divided into three groups: adults aged 18-64 years with (n = 408) and without (n = 1028) chronic medical conditions (CMC) and adults ≥ 65 years (n = 514). Logistic regression was used to measure associations between sociodemographic factors and non-vaccination for the 2015-2016 influenza season. Weighted proportions were calculated to determine the main self-reported reasons for not receiving the influenza vaccine.
    RESULTS:

    Younger age was found to be associated with non-vaccination across all groups. In adults ≥ 65 years, elementary- or secondary- vs. university-level education (aOR 1.87, 95% CI 1.14-3.06) was also significantly associated with non-vaccination. Significant variation in vaccine uptake was found for several sociodemographic factors in adults aged 18-64 without CMC. Low perceived susceptibility or severity of influenza and lack of belief in the vaccine's effectiveness were the most commonly reported reasons for not receiving the vaccine.
    CONCLUSION:

    In general, our results were consistent with findings from other Canadian and American studies on seasonal influenza vaccine uptake. Belief that the influenza vaccine is not needed was common, even among those at increased risk of influenza-related complications. Additional research is needed to better understand how sociodemographic factors such as income and education may influence uptake and to raise awareness of potential complications from influenza infection in high-risk adults.


    KEYWORDS:

    Adults; Canada; Immunization programs; Influenza vaccine; Surveys and questionnaires

    PMID: 29981075 DOI: 10.17269/s41997-018-0018-9
Working...
X