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J Infect Dis . What is the economic benefit of annual COVID-19 vaccination from the adult individual perspective?

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  • J Infect Dis . What is the economic benefit of annual COVID-19 vaccination from the adult individual perspective?

    J Infect Dis


    . 2024 Apr 6:jiae179.
    doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiae179. Online ahead of print. What is the economic benefit of annual COVID-19 vaccination from the adult individual perspective?

    Sarah M Bartsch 1 2 3 , Kelly J O'Shea 1 2 3 , Colleen Weatherwax 1 2 3 , Ulrich Strych 4 , Kavya Velmurugan 1 2 3 , Danielle C John 1 2 3 , Maria Elena Bottazzi 4 5 , Mustafa Hussein 6 , Marie F Martinez 1 2 3 , Kevin L Chin 1 2 3 , Allan Ciciriello 4 , Jessie Heneghan 1 2 3 , Alexis Dibbs 1 2 3 , Sheryl A Scannell 1 2 3 , Peter J Hotez 4 5 , Bruce Y Lee 1 2 3



    AffiliationsAbstract

    Background: With COVID-19 vaccination no longer mandated by many businesses/organizations, it is now up to individuals to decide whether to get any new boosters/updated vaccines going forward.
    Methods: We developed a Markov model representing the potential clinical/economic outcomes from an individual perspective in the United States of getting versus not getting an annual COVID-19 vaccine.
    Results: For an 18-49-year-old, getting vaccinated at its current price ($60) can save the individual on average $30-$603 if the individual is uninsured and $4-$437 if the individual has private insurance, as long as the starting vaccine efficacy against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is ≥50% and the weekly risk of getting infected is ≥0.2%, corresponding to an individual interacting with 9 other people in a day under Winter 2023-2024 Omicron SARS-CoV-2 variant conditions with an average infection prevalence of 10%. For a 50-64-year-old, these cost-savings increase to $111-$1,278 and $119-$1,706, for someone without and with insurance, respectively. The risk threshold increases to ≥0.4% (interacting with 19 people/day), when the individual has 13.4% pre-existing protection against infection (e.g., vaccinated 9 months earlier).
    Conclusion: There is both clinical and economic incentive for the individual to continue to get vaccinated against COVID-19 each year.

    Keywords: Booster; COVID-19; Economic; Individual; Model; Vaccination.

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