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PLoS ONE. Potential benefit during an Influenza Pandemic of H5N1/H1N1 cross-protection establishment derived from Monoclonal Antibody techniques applied on B Cells.

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  • PLoS ONE. Potential benefit during an Influenza Pandemic of H5N1/H1N1 cross-protection establishment derived from Monoclonal Antibody techniques applied on B Cells.

    Potential benefit during an Influenza Pandemic of H5N1/H1N1 cross-protection establishment derived from Monoclonal Antibody techniques applied on B Cells. - ECDC Health Content
    Scientific Advances Pandemic Influenza

    Potential benefit during an Influenza Pandemic of H5N1/H1N1 cross-protection establishment derived from Monoclonal Antibody techniques applied on B Cells.

    Throsby M, van den Brink E, Jongeneelen M, Poon LLM , Alard P, et al. (2008) Heterosubtypic Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Cross-Protective against H5N1 and H1N1 Recovered from Human IgM+ Memory B Cells. PLoS ONE 3(12): e3942. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0003942.

    Description:

    This human and animal (mice) based laboratory study was carried out to explore the possibilities of broad spectrum treatment or protection for antigenically diverse influenza virus subtypes, like H1, H2, H5, H6, H8 and H9 all of which are considered to have the potential to cause Influenza pandemics in humans.

    In this work the authors used human donors recently vaccinated with the seasonal Influenza vaccine to create combinatorial libraries built from their B cells, instead of using convalescent patient material as it was the case with previous studies around this topic.

    These libraries were submitted to antibody phage display techniques and the result was a collection of human antibodies with an unexpectedly broad range of Influenza subtype neutralization, including the high risk pandemic subtypes mentioned above.

    A human monoclonal antibody termed CR6261 developed in this study was protective in mice when given before and after challenge with what was otherwise lethal doses of either A(H5N1) or A(H1N1

    ECDC Comment (January 8th):
    The problem of immunological approaches to influenza be they through vaccination or iuse of passive antibodies is that they tend to be type specific. On the whole vaccines against one influenza sub-type will not work against others. Hence a monoclonal like this that is active in vitro across a range of heamagglutinin (HA) types is unusual and exciting. The fact that it could protect mice against both A(H1N1) and A(H5N1) is also of considerable interest.
    -
    <cite cite="http://ecdc.europa.eu/en/health_content/sciadv/090108_sciadv.aspx">ECDC Health Content</cite>
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