Front Public Health


. 2023 Feb 14;11:1106336.
doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2023.1106336. eCollection 2023.
Association of ambient carbon monoxide exposure with hospitalization risk for respiratory diseases: A time series study in Ganzhou, China


Jiahao Song 1 2 , Weihong Qiu 1 2 , Xuezan Huang 1 2 , You Guo 3 4 5 , Weihong Chen 1 2 , Dongming Wang 1 2 , Xiaokang Zhang 3 4 5



Affiliations

Abstract

Background: Ambient carbon monoxide (CO) exposure is associated with increased mortality and hospitalization risk for total respiratory diseases. However, evidence on the risk of hospitalization for specific respiratory diseases from ambient CO exposure is limited.
Methods: Data on daily hospitalizations for respiratory diseases, air pollutants, and meteorological factors from January 2016 to December 2020 were collected in Ganzhou, China. A generalized additive model with the quasi-Poisson link and lag structures was used to estimate the associations between ambient CO concentration and hospitalizations of total respiratory diseases, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), and influenza-pneumonia. Possible confounding co-pollutants and effect modification by gender, age, and season were considered.
Results: A total of 72,430 hospitalized cases of respiratory diseases were recorded. Significant positive exposure-response relationships were observed between ambient CO exposure and hospitalization risk from respiratory diseases. For each 1 mg/m3 increase in CO concentration (lag0-2), hospitalizations for total respiratory diseases, asthma, COPD, LRTI, and influenza-pneumonia increased by 13.56 (95% CI: 6.76%, 20.79%), 17.74 (95% CI: 1.34%, 36.8%), 12.45 (95% CI: 2.91%, 22.87%), 41.25 (95% CI: 18.19%, 68.81%), and 13.5% (95% CI: 3.41%, 24.56%), respectively. In addition, the associations of ambient CO with hospitalizations for total respiratory diseases and influenza-pneumonia were stronger during the warm season, while women were more susceptible to ambient CO exposure-associated hospitalizations for asthma and LRTI (all P < 0.05).
Conclusion: In brief, significant positive exposure-response relationships were found between ambient CO exposure and hospitalization risk for total respiratory diseases, asthma, COPD, LRTI, and influenza-pneumonia. Effect modification by season and gender was found in ambient CO exposure-associated respiratory hospitalizations.

Keywords: air pollution; carbon monoxide; hospitalizations; respiratory diseases; respiratory tract infection (RTI); time series study.