Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Respiratory viruses in individuals with high frequency of animal exposure in southern and highland Vietnam

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Respiratory viruses in individuals with high frequency of animal exposure in southern and highland Vietnam


    J Med Virol. 2019 Nov 26. doi: 10.1002/jmv.25640. [Epub ahead of print] Respiratory viruses in individuals with high frequency of animal exposure in southern and highland Vietnam.

    Nguyen TKT1,2,3, Ngo TT2, Tran MP2, Pham TTT2, Vu TTH2, Nguyen THN2, Thwaites G2,4, Virtala AK5, Vapalahti O1,5,6, Baker S2,4,7, Le VT2; VIZIONS consortium.
    Author information

    1 Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. 2 Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. 3 Dong Thap Provincial Center for Disease Control, Dong Thap Province, Vietnam. 4 Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom. 5 Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. 6 Virology and Immunology, HUSLAB, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. 7 The Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

    Abstract

    INTRODUCTION:

    Active surveillance for zoonotic respiratory viruses is essential to inform the development of appropriate interventions and outbreak responses. Here we target individuals with high frequency of animal exposure in Vietnam.
    METHODS:

    A 3-year community-based surveillance was conducted in Vietnam during 2013-2016. We enrolled total of 581 individuals (animal-raising farmers, slaughterers, animal-health workers and rat-traders), and utilized RT-PCR to detect 15 common respiratory viruses in pooled nasal-throat swabs collected at baseline or acute respiratory-disease episodes.
    RESULTS:

    A respiratory virus was detected in 7.9% (58/732) of baseline samples, and 17.7% (136/770) of disease-episode samples (p<0.001), with enteroviruses, rhinoviruses and influenza A virus being the predominant viruses detected. There were temporal and spatial fluctuations in the frequencies of the detected viruses over the study period, e.g. enteroviruses and influenza A viruses were more often detected during rainy seasons.
    CONCLUSION:

    We reported the detection of common respiratory viruses in individuals with high frequency of animal exposure in Vietnam, an emerging infectious diseases hotspot. The results show the value of baseline/control sampling in delineating the causative relationships, and have revealed important insights into the ecological aspects of enteroviruses, rhinoviruses and influenza A and their contributions to the burden posed by respiratory infections in Vietnam. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.


    KEYWORDS:

    Vietnam; asymptomatic; cohort study; respiratory disease; viral etiology; zoonoses

    PMID: 31769525 DOI: 10.1002/jmv.25640

Working...
X