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Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of children hospitalized due to influenza A and B in the south of Europe, 2010-2016

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  • Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of children hospitalized due to influenza A and B in the south of Europe, 2010-2016

    Sci Rep. 2019 Sep 6;9(1):12853. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-49273-z.
    Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of children hospitalized due to influenza A and B in the south of Europe, 2010-2016.

    Jané M1,2, Vidal MJ3, Soldevila N4,5, Romero A5, Martínez A3,4, Torner N3,4, Godoy P3,4, Launes C4,6, Rius C4,7, Marcos MA8, Dominguez A4,5.
    Author information

    1 Public Health Agency of Catalonia. Department of Health, Barcelona, Spain. mireia.jane@gencat.cat. 2 CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain. mireia.jane@gencat.cat. 3 Public Health Agency of Catalonia. Department of Health, Barcelona, Spain. 4 CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain. 5 Department of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. 6 Sant Joan de Deu Children's Hospital, Esplugues de Llobregat, Spain. 7 Public Health Agency of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. 8 Hospital Clínic of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

    Abstract

    Influenza produces annual epidemics that affect 5-15% of the world population. Complications and hospitalizations are more frequent in childhood. This study describes and analyses the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of children hospitalized due to confirmed influenza in influenza surveillance sentinel hospitals in Catalonia. Retrospective descriptive study conducted in six influenza seasons (2010-2011 to 2015-2016) in persons aged 0-17 years diagnosed with laboratory-confirmed influenza requiring hospitalization. 291 cases were notified to the health authorities: 79.4% were due to the influenza A virus and 20.6% to the B virus. The most common subtype was H1N1 with 57.6% of cases: 52.6% were male, 56.7% were aged <2 years, and 24.4% were aged <1 year. 62.2% of cases had pneumonia, 26.8% acute respiratory distress syndrome and 11.7% bacterial pneumonia. 5.8% of cases were vaccinated and 21.3% required intensive care unit admission, of whom 54.8% were aged <2 years. There were 3 deaths, all with influenza A infection. Influenza A cases were younger than influenza B cases (OR 3.22; 95% CI: 1.73-6.00). Conclusion: Children aged <2 years are especially vulnerable to the A H1N1 virus, including those without pre-existing chronic disease. These results are relevant for the planning of vaccination programs to improve maternal and child health.


    PMID: 31492899 DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-49273-z
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