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H3N2 avian influenza viruses detected in live poultry markets in China bind to human-type receptors and transmit in guinea pigs and ferrets

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  • H3N2 avian influenza viruses detected in live poultry markets in China bind to human-type receptors and transmit in guinea pigs and ferrets

    Emerg Microbes Infect. 2019;8(1):1280-1290. doi: 10.1080/22221751.2019.1660590.
    H3N2 avian influenza viruses detected in live poultry markets in China bind to human-type receptors and transmit in guinea pigs and ferrets.

    Guan L1, Shi J1, Kong X1, Ma S1, Zhang Y1, Yin X1, He X1, Liu L1, Suzuki Y2, Li C1, Deng G1, Chen H1.
    Author information

    1 State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research Institute, CAAS , Harbin , People's Republic of China. 2 College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University , Aichi , Japan.

    Abstract

    The H3N2 influenza viruses became widespread in humans during the 1968 H3N2 pandemic and have been a major cause of influenza epidemics ever since. Different lineages of H3N2 influenza viruses are also commonly found in animals. If a different lineage of H3N2 virus jumps to humans, a human influenza pandemic could occur with devastating consequences. Here, we studied the genetics, receptor-binding properties, and replication and transmission in mammals of 15 H3N2 avian influenza viruses detected in live poultry markets in China. We found that the H3N2 avian influenza viruses are complicated reassortants with distinct replication phenotypes in mice. Five viruses replicated efficiently in mice and bound to both human-type and avian-type receptors. These viruses transmitted efficiently to direct-contact guinea pigs, and three of them also transmitted among guinea pigs and ferrets via respiratory droplets. Moreover, ferret antiserum induced by human H3N2 viruses did not react with any of the H3N2 avian influenza viruses. Our study demonstrates that the H3N2 avian influenza viruses pose a clear threat to human health and emphasizes the need for continued surveillance and evaluation of the H3N2 influenza viruses circulating in nature.


    KEYWORDS:

    Avian influenza virus; H3N2; ferret; guinea pig; transmission

    PMID: 31495283 DOI: 10.1080/22221751.2019.1660590
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