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Expanding severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) surveillance beyond influenza: The process and data from 1 year of implementation in Vietnam

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  • Expanding severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) surveillance beyond influenza: The process and data from 1 year of implementation in Vietnam

    Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2018 May 13. doi: 10.1111/irv.12571. [Epub ahead of print]
    Expanding severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) surveillance beyond influenza: The process and data from 1 year of implementation in Vietnam.

    Alroy KA1, Do TT2, Tran PD3, Dang TQ3, Vu LN3, Le NTH3, Dang AD4, Ngu ND4, Ngo TH4, Hoang PMV4, Phan LT5, Nguyen TV5, Nguyen LT5, Nguyen TV5, Vien MQ6, Le HX6, Dao AT6, Nguyen TB6, Pham DT7, Nguyen VTT7, Pham TN7, Phan BH7, Whitaker B1, Do TTT2, Dao PA2, Balajee SA1, Mounts AW2,8.
    Author information

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND:

    In 2016, as a component of the Global Health Security Agenda, the Vietnam Ministry of Health expanded its existing influenza sentinel surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) to include testing for 7 additional viral respiratory pathogens. This article describes the steps taken to implement expanded SARI surveillance in Vietnam and reports data from 1 year of expanded surveillance.
    METHOD:

    The process of expanding the suite of pathogens for routine testing by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) included laboratory trainings, procurement/distribution of reagents, and strengthening and aligning SARI surveillance epidemiology practices at sentinel sites and regional institutes (RI).
    RESULTS:

    Surveillance data showed that of 4,003 specimens tested by the RI laboratories, 20.2% (n = 810) were positive for influenza virus. Of the 3,193 influenza-negative specimens, 41.8% (n = 1,337) were positive for at least 1 non-influenza respiratory virus, of which 16.2% (n = 518), 13.4% (n = 428), and 9.6% (n = 308) tested positive for respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, and adenovirus, respectively.
    CONCLUSIONS:

    The Government of Vietnam has demonstrated that expanding respiratory viral surveillance by strengthening and building upon an influenza platform is feasible, efficient, and practical. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.


    KEYWORDS:

    Vietnam; adenovirus; global health security; influenza virus; respiratory syncytial virus; rhinovirus; severe acute respiratory infection (SARI)

    PMID: 29754431 DOI: 10.1111/irv.12571
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