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BMC Public Health . Addressing COVID-19 inequities using bidirectional crisis and emergency risk communication and vaccine clinic interventions: a descriptive study

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  • BMC Public Health . Addressing COVID-19 inequities using bidirectional crisis and emergency risk communication and vaccine clinic interventions: a descriptive study

    BMC Public Health


    . 2023 Aug 10;23(1):1517.
    doi: 10.1186/s12889-023-16410-3. Addressing COVID-19 inequities using bidirectional crisis and emergency risk communication and vaccine clinic interventions: a descriptive study

    Abby M Lohr 1 , Kelao Charmaine Neumbo 2 , Jane W Njeru 3 , Luz Molina 4 5 , Rachel Hasley 6 , Yahye Ahmed 4 5 , Onelis Quirindongo-Cedeno 3 , Gloria A Torres-Herbeck 4 5 7 , Miriam L Goodson 4 5 7 , Ahmed Osman 8 , Jenny A Weis 9 , Mark L Wieland 3 , Irene G Sia 4



    AffiliationsAbstract

    Background: Im/migrants (immigrants and migrants, including refugees, asylum seekers, and individuals without legal documentation) experience unique assets and needs in relation to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is one way to engage im/migrant communities. Rochester Healthy Community Partnership (RHCP) is a CBPR partnership in Rochester, Minnesota. RHCP partners noted that credible COVID-19 information was not available to their communities. In response, RHCP formed a COVID-19 Task Force and adapted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication (CERC) framework to create an intervention that prioritized im/migrant groups experiencing health disparities. In the CERC intervention, communication leaders delivered COVID-19 health messages to their social networks and documented related concerns. RHCP relayed these concerns to regional leaders to ensure that im/migrant experiences were included in decision making. Once vaccines were available, RHCP continued to deploy the CERC intervention to promote vaccination equity. The aims of this paper are to (1) describe the implementation of a bidirectional CERC intervention for vaccination equity, and (2) describe a community-engaged and community-based vaccine clinic intervention.
    Methods: First, we surveyed participants (n = 37) to assess COVID-19 experiences, acceptability of the CERC intervention, and motivation to receive a COVID-19 vaccination. Second, we collaborated with community partners to hold vaccine clinics. We report descriptive statistics from each intervention.
    Results: When asked about the acceptability of the CERC intervention for vaccine equity, most participants either reported that they 'really liked it' or 'thought it was just ok'. Most participants stated that they would recommend the program to family or friends who have not yet received the COVID-19 vaccine. Almost all participants reported that they felt 'much more' or 'somewhat more' motivated to receive a COVID-19 vaccine after the intervention. We administered 1158 vaccines at the vaccination clinics.
    Conclusions: We found that participants viewed the CERC intervention for vaccination equity as an acceptable way to disseminate COVID-19-related information. Nearly all participants reported that the intervention convinced them to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. In our experience, community-engaged and community-based clinics are a successful way to administer vaccines to im/migrant communities during a pandemic.

    Keywords: Access; COVID-19; Community-based participatory research; Evaluation; Health Care Quality; Health equity; Immigrants; Refugees; Vaccination.

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