Intern Med. 2012;51(17):2429-31. Epub 2012 Sep 1.
Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome following influenza a infection.
Morita A, Ishihara M, Kamei S, Ishikawa H.
Source

Division of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, Japan.
Abstract

A 60-year-old woman developed opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) a week after being diagnosed with influenza A infection by a rapid antigen test. She had no loss of consciousness. Opsoclonus, myoclonus, and truncal ataxia were noted. Two weeks after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and corticosteroids, her opsoclonus, myoclonus, and truncal ataxia disappeared. No malignant tumors were detected during the 3-year follow-up period. There has been no previous report of postinfectious OMS following confirmed influenza A infection. OMS without a loss of consciousness has been reported to be statistically less common in cases of non-paraneoplastic OMS. This finding was consistent with the present patient's clinical manifestations.

PMID:
22975562
[PubMed - in process]

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A 60-year-old woman developed opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) a week after being diagnosed with influenza A infection by a rapid antigen test. She had no loss of consciousness. Opsoclonus, myoclonus, and truncal ataxia were noted. Two weeks after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and cor …