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Influenza in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients (February)

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  • Influenza in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients (February)

    Ann Pharmacother. 2012 Jan 10. [Epub ahead of print]
    Influenza in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients (February).
    Martin ST, Torabi MJ, Gabardi S.
    Source

    < NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY.
    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE:

    To review available data describing the epidemiology, outcomes, prevention, and treatment of influenza virus in the solid organ transplant population and to evaluate the strengths and limitations of the current literature, with a focus on literature reviewing annual influenza strains and the recent pandemic novel influenza A/H1N1 strain.
    DATA SOURCES:

    A systematic literature search (July 1980-June 2011) was performed via PubMed using the following key words: influenza, human; influenza; novel influenza A H1/N1; transplantation; solid organ transplantation; kidney transplant; renal transplant; lung transplant; heart transplant; and liver transplant.
    STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION:

    Papers were excluded if they were not written in English or were animal studies or in vitro studies. Data from fully published studies and recent reports from international conferences were included.
    DATA SYNTHESIS:

    The influenza virus presents a constant challenge to immuno-compromised patients and their health care providers. The annual influenza strain introduces a highly infectious and pathogenic risk to solid organ transplant recipients. In 2009, the World Health Organization declared a pandemic as a result of a novel influenza A/H1N1 strain. The pandemic introduced an additionalviral threat to solid organ transplant patients at increased risk for infectious complications. The mainstay for prevention of influenza infection in all at-risk populations is appropriate vaccination. Antiviral therapies against influenza for chemoprophylaxis and treatment of infection are available; however, dosing strategies in the solid organ transplant population are not well defined.
    CONCLUSIONS:

    The solid organ transplant population is at an increased risk of severe complications from influenza infection. Identifying risks, preventing illness, and appropriately treating active infection is essential in this patient population.

    PMID:
    22234989
    [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

    The solid organ transplant population is at an increased risk of severe complications from influenza infection. Identifying risks, preventing illness, and appropriately treating active infection is essential in this patient population.
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