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  • Epidemiologic theory, social epidemiology, population health

    Sincere thanks to Oxford Journals
    The first 150 words of the full text of this article appear below.

    Epidemiologic theory, social epidemiology, population health

    International Journal of Epidemiology 2007 36(6):1173-1180; doi:10.1093/ije/dym228

    Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association © The Author 2007; all rights reserved.

    Commentary: Ways of asking and ways of living: reflections on the 50th anniversary of Morris’ ever-useful Uses of Epidemiology

    <nobr>Nancy Krieger</nobr> Department of Society, Human Development and Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Kresge 717, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA

    ‘Epidemiology is the only way of asking some questions<sup> </sup>in medicine, one way of asking others (and no way at all to<sup> </sup>ask many).’ Jeremy<sup> </sup>M. Morris
    Uses<sup> </sup>of Epidemiology (1957, p. 96)<sup>1</sup>

    To be of use. To Jeremy Morris<sup> </sup>(b. 1910), writing a half-century ago in his now classic text,<sup> </sup>Uses of Epidemiology,<sup>1</sup> the promise—and responsibility—of<sup> </sup>epidemiology was clear: to generate scientific knowledge about<sup> </sup>the ‘presence, nature and distribution of health and disease<sup> </sup>among the population’ (p. 96),<sup>1</sup> ultimately in order to<sup> </sup>‘abolish the clinical picture’(p. 98).<sup>1</sup> Committed<sup> </sup>to improving the ‘health of the community’ (p. 96),<sup>1</sup>Morris<sup> </sup>argued that ‘one of the most urgent social needs of the<sup> </sup>day’ that epidemiology could address was ‘identifying<sup> </sup>harmful ways of living’ and ‘rules of healthy living’<sup> </sup>(p. 98).<sup>1</sup> Uniquely equipping epidemiology to carry out this<sup> </sup>task was, in his view, its population and historical perspective<sup> </sup>and <nobr>. . .</nobr> [Full Text of this Article]<!--
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    <table bgcolor="#e1e1e1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr><td align="left" bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="middle" width="5%"></td> <th align="left" valign="middle" width="95%"> Epidemiology is an historical science </th></tr></tbody></table>

    <table bgcolor="#e1e1e1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr><td align="left" bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="middle" width="5%"></td> <th align="left" valign="middle" width="95%"> Epidemiology is a population science </th></tr></tbody></table>
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    <table bgcolor="#e1e1e1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr><td align="left" bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="middle" width="5%"></td> <th align="left" valign="middle" width="95%"> Epidemiology is a causally pragmatic and contextual science </th></tr></tbody></table>
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    <table bgcolor="#e1e1e1" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"> <tbody><tr><td align="left" bgcolor="#ffffff" valign="middle" width="5%"></td> <th align="left" valign="middle" width="95%"> Conclusion: the importance of ways of asking for knowledge for healthy ways of living </th></tr></tbody></table>
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    Online ISSN 1464-3685 - Print ISSN 0300-5771
    Copyright © 2007 International Epidemiological Association

    Oxford Journals Oxford University Press




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