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medRxiv - Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 are associated with protection against reinfection - 6 months protection for most people after infection? - November 18, 2020

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  • medRxiv - Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 are associated with protection against reinfection - 6 months protection for most people after infection? - November 18, 2020


    Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 are associated with protection against reinfection

    Sheila F Lumley, Denise O'Donnell, Nicole E Stoesser, Philippa C Matthews, Alison Howarth, Stephanie B Hatch, Brian D Marsden, Stuart Cox, Tim James, Fiona Warren, Li am J Peck, Thomas G Ritter, Zoe de Toledo, Laura Warren, David Axten, Richard J Cornall, E Yvonne Jones, David I Stuart, Gavin Screaton, Daniel Ebner, Sarah Hoos dally, Meera Chand, Oxford University Hospitals Staff Testing Group, Derrick W Crook, Anne-Marie O'Donnell, Christopher P Conlon, Koen B Pouwels, A Sarah Walker, Tim EA Peto, Susan Hopkins, Tim M Walker, Katie Jeffery, David W Eyre

    doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.11.18.20234369

    This article is a preprint and has not been certified by peer review [what does this mean?]. It reports new medical research that has yet to be evaluated and so should not be used to guide clinical practice

    Abstract


    Background
    It is critical to understand whether infection with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) protects from subsequent reinfection.

    Methods
    We investigated the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 PCR-positive results in seropositive and seronegative healthcare workers (HCWs) attending asymptomatic and symptomatic staff testing at Oxford University Hospitals, UK. Baseline antibody status was determined using anti-spike and/or anti-nucleocapsid IgG assays and staff followed for up to 30 weeks. We used Poisson regression to estimate the relative incidence of PCR-positive results and new symptomatic infection by antibody status, accounting for age, gender and changes in incidence over time.

    Results
    A total of 12219 HCWs participated and had anti-spike IgG measured, 11052 were followed up after negative and 1246 after positive antibody results including 79 who seroconverted during follow up. 89 PCR-confirmed symptomatic infections occurred in seronegative individuals (0.46 cases per 10,000 days at risk) and no symptomatic infections in those with anti-spike antibodies. Additionally, 76 (0.40/10,000 days at risk) anti-spike IgG seronegative individuals had PCR-positive tests in asymptomatic screening, compared to 3 (0.21/10,000 days at risk) seropositive individuals. Overall, positive baseline anti-spike antibodies were associated with lower rates of PCR-positivity (with or without symptoms) (adjusted rate ratio 0.24 [95%CI 0.08-0.76, p=0.015]). Rate ratios were similar using anti-nucleocapsid IgG alone or combined with anti-spike IgG to determine baseline status.

    Conclusions
    Prior SARS-CoV-2 infection that generated antibody responses offered protection from reinfection for most people in the six months following infection. Further work is required to determine the long-term duration and correlates of post-infection immunity.

    https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1....18.20234369v1
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