Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Long-term wildlife mortality surveillance in northern Congo: a model for the detection of Ebola virus disease epizootics

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Long-term wildlife mortality surveillance in northern Congo: a model for the detection of Ebola virus disease epizootics

    Long-term wildlife mortality surveillance in northern Congo: a model for the detection of Ebola virus disease epizootics

    Eeva Kuisma
    , Sarah H. Olson
    , Kenneth N. Cameron
    , Patricia E. Reed
    , William B. Karesh
    , Alain I. Ondzie
    , Marc-Jo?l Akongo
    , Serge D. Kaba
    , Robert J. Fischer
    , Stephanie N. Seifert
    , C?sar Mu?oz-Fontela
    , Beate Becker-Ziaja
    , ? Show all Authors


    Published:12 August 2019https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2018.0339

    Abstract

    Ebolavirus (EBOV) has caused disease outbreaks taking thousands of lives, costing billions of dollars in control efforts and threatening great ape populations. EBOV ecology is not fully understood but infected wildlife and consumption of animal carcasses have been linked to human outbreaks, especially in the Congo Basin. Partnering with the Congolese Ministry of Health, we conducted wildlife mortality surveillance and educational outreach in the northern Republic of Congo (RoC). Designed for EBOV detection and to alert public health authorities, we established a low-cost wildlife mortality reporting network covering 50 000 km2. Simultaneously, we delivered educational outreach promoting behavioural change to over 6600 people in rural northern RoC. We achieved specimen collection by training project staff on a safe sampling protocol and equipping geographically distributed bases with sampling kits. We established in-country diagnostics for EBOV testing, reducing diagnostic turnaround time to 3 days and demonstrated the absence of EBOV in 58 carcasses. Central Africa remains a high-risk EBOV region, but RoC, home to the largest remaining populations of great apes, has not had an epidemic since 2005. This effort continues to function as an untested early warning system in RoC, where people and great apes have died from past Ebola virus disease outbreaks.
    This article is part of the theme issue ?Dynamic and integrative approaches to understanding pathogen spillover?.

    https://royalsocietypublishing.org/d...rstb.2018.0339


Working...
X