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BJGP Open . Qualitative evaluation of a molecular point-of-care testing study for influenza in UK primary care

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  • BJGP Open . Qualitative evaluation of a molecular point-of-care testing study for influenza in UK primary care

    BJGP Open


    . 2024 Jul 9:BJGPO.2024.0112.
    doi: 10.3399/BJGPO.2024.0112. Online ahead of print. Qualitative evaluation of a molecular point-of-care testing study for influenza in UK primary care

    Charis Xuan Xie 1 2 , Uy Hoang 1 , Jessica Smylie 1 , Carole Aspden 1 , Elizabeth Button 1 , Cecilia Okusi 1 , Rachel Byford 1 , Filipa Ferreira 1 , Sneha Anand 1 , Utkarsh Agrawal 1 , Matthew Inada-Kim 3 , Tristan Clark 4 , Simon de Lusignan 5



    AffiliationsAbstract

    Background: Influenza contributes to the surge in winter infections and the consequent winter pressures on the health service. Molecular point-of-care testing(POCT) for influenza might improve patient management by providing rapid and accurate clinical diagnosis to inform the timely initiation of antiviral therapy and reduce unnecessary admissions and antibiotics use.
    Aim: To explore factors that influence the adoption or non-adoption of POCT in English general practices and provide insights to enable its integration into routine practice workflows.
    Design & setting: A qualitative implementation evaluation was conducted in ten general practices within the English national sentinel network (Oxford-RCGP Research and Surveillance Centre), from April to July 2023.
    Method: Using the nonadoption, abandonment, scale-up, spread, and sustainability framework, data collection and analysis were conducted across ten practices. We made ethnographic observations of the POCT workflow and surveyed the practice staff for their perspectives on POCT implementation. Data were analysed using a mix of descriptive statistics, graphical modelling techniques and framework approach.
    Results: Ethnographic observations identified two modes of POCT integration into practice workflow: 1) clinician POCT workflow - typically involving batch testing due to time constraints, 2) research nurse/healthcare assistant POCT workflow - characterised by immediate testing of individual patients. Survey indicated that most primary care staff considered the POCT training offered was sufficient, and these practices were ready for change and had the capacity and resources to integrate POCT in workflows.
    Conclusion: General practices should demonstrate flexibility in the workflow and workforce they deploy to integrate POCT into routine clinical workflow.

    Keywords: General Practice; Influenza; Point-of-Care Testing.

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