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J Hosp Infect. Rapid diagnosis of seasonal Influenza virus and cohorting of hospitalised patients on a 'flu ward'. A prospective analysis of outcomes

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  • J Hosp Infect. Rapid diagnosis of seasonal Influenza virus and cohorting of hospitalised patients on a 'flu ward'. A prospective analysis of outcomes


    J Hosp Infect. 2020 Apr 17. pii: S0195-6701(20)30122-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2020.03.023. [Epub ahead of print]
    Rapid diagnosis of seasonal Influenza virus and cohorting of hospitalised patients on a 'flu ward'. A prospective analysis of outcomes.


    O'Kelly B1, Conway A2, McNally C2, McConkey S3, Kelly A4, de Barra E3.

    Author information




    Abstract

    BACKGROUND:

    The influenza season of 2017/2018 was burdensome in comparison to previous years. In patient management of seasonal influenza patients is poorly described.
    AIM:

    To assess the impact of managing influenza patients on a dedicated influenza ward on antimicrobial use and duration, and length of stay (LOS).
    METHODS:

    A prospective cohort study from Jan 1st to Feb 28th 2018. Patients diagnosed with influenza in the Emergency Department (ED) were cohorted under infectious disease (ID) or a general internal medicine (GIM) firms on a 35 bed influenza ward. At times of maximum capacity some patients were managed on other wards by other firms 'non flu ward'.
    FINDINGS:

    91 patients were admitted to the influenza ward from ED (64 ID, 27 GIM), 38 had influenza A. Patients managed by ID were more likely to be switched to oral antibiotics sooner median 3 vs 5 days p=.049. Antibiotic duration was shorter for patients managed by the ID firm median 7 vs 9 days p=.016. LOS was shorter for patients managed by the ID firm on the flu ward vs 'non flu ward', median 5 vs 9 days p=.007. No significant difference was seen between ID and GIM LOS on the flu ward, median 5 vs 7 days p=0.30.
    CONCLUSION:

    Influenza patients managed by an infectious disease service on an influenza ward had reduced length of intravenous (IV) and total antimicrobial use compared to a GIM service and had reduced LOS compared to the standard of care, 'non flu ward' influenza patients.
    Copyright 2020 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.



    KEYWORDS:

    influenza; influenza ward; prospective cohort study; seasonal influenza


    PMID:32311407DOI:10.1016/j.jhin.2020.03.023

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