J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2019 Aug 29. pii: S1544-3191(19)30349-8. doi: 10.1016/j.japh.2019.07.011. [Epub ahead of print]
Evaluation of a community pharmacy-based influenza and group A streptococcal pharyngitis disease management program using polymerase chain reaction point-of-care testing.

Klepser DG, Klepser ME, Murry JS, Borden H, Olsen KM.
Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-waived real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) molecular test into a community pharmacy setting as part of a collaborative influenza and group A Streptococcus (GAS) disease management program.
SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:

Two community pharmacy sites in Tennessee.
PRACTICE DESCRIPTION:

Patients presenting to the pharmacy with symptoms consistent with influenza or GAS from November 1, 2016, to April 30, 2018.
PRACTICE INNOVATION:

Influenza and GAS management programs based on previously developed protocols occurred at 2 community pharmacies in Tennessee. Pharmacies used the Cobas Liat testing system (Roche Diagnostics). Based on test results and under a collaborative practice agreement, pharmacists dispensed prescription medications for patients with a positive test: oseltamivir for influenza and amoxicillin for GAS. Patients with negative tests were treated with over-the-counter (OTC) medications or referred. Patients testing negative for GAS were asked to consent to having a second throat swab sent for culture.
EVALUATION:

Number of patients tested, point-of-care test results, and treatment received.
RESULTS:

Two hundred and two patients received care at the 2 pharmacies (116 for influenza, 46 for GAS, and 43 for both). Sixty (38%) tested positive for influenza, with 51 receiving an antiviral prescription, and 16 (18%) tested positive and were treated for GAS. No patient testing negative for either or positive for influenza was dispensed an antibiotic. For patients consenting to a follow-up culture, all GAS cultures sent for confirmatory testing were negative.
CONCLUSION:

A protocol-driven community pharmacy-based disease management program using real-time PCR testing for influenza and GAS was able to offer appropriate treatment to patients without overuse of antibiotics.
Copyright © 2019 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


PMID: 31474527 DOI: 10.1016/j.japh.2019.07.011