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Viruses. 2018 Jul 5;10(7). pii: E356. doi: 10.3390/v10070356. Anti-Influenza A Viral Butenolide from Streptomyces sp. Smu03 Inhabiting the Intestine of Elephas maximus

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  • Viruses. 2018 Jul 5;10(7). pii: E356. doi: 10.3390/v10070356. Anti-Influenza A Viral Butenolide from Streptomyces sp. Smu03 Inhabiting the Intestine of Elephas maximus

    Viruses. 2018 Jul 5;10(7). pii: E356. doi: 10.3390/v10070356.
    Anti-Influenza A Viral Butenolide from Streptomyces sp. Smu03 Inhabiting the Intestine of Elephas maximus.

    Li F1,2, Chen D3, Lu S4, Yang G5, Zhang X6, Chen Z7, Fan S8, Wu S9, He J10.
    Author information

    Abstract

    Actinobacteria are a phylum of bacteria known for their potential in producing structurally diversified natural products that are always associated with a broad range of biological activities. In this paper, using an H5N1 pseudo-typed virus drug screening system combined with a bioassay guided purification approach, an antiviral butanolide (1) was identified from the culture broth of Streptomyces sp. SMU03, a bacterium isolated from the feces of Elephas maximus in Yunnan province, China. This compound displayed broad and potent activity against a panel of influenza viruses including H1N1 and H3N2 subtypes, as well as influenza B virus and clinical isolates with half maximal inhibitory concentration values (IC50) in the range of 0.29 to 12 µg/mL. In addition, 1 was also active against oseltamivir-resistant influenza virus strain of A/PR/8/34 with NA-H274Y mutation. Studies on the detailed modes of action suggested that 1 functioned by interfering with the fusogenic process of hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A virus (IAV), thereby blocking the entry of virus into host cells. Furthermore, the anti-IAV activity of 1 was assessed with infected BALB/c mice, of which the appearance, weight, and histopathological changes in the infected lungs were significantly alleviated compared with the no-drug-treated group. Conclusively, these results provide evidence that natural products derived from microbes residing in animal intestines might be a good source for antiviral drug discovery.


    KEYWORDS:

    Streptomyces sp.; anti-influenza A viruses; butenolide; hemagglutinin

    PMID: 29976861 DOI: 10.3390/v10070356
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