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  • Texas - Seasonal flu 2013/2014 (other than Dallas or Houston areas)

    Source: http://www.kwtx.com/home/headlines/L...1.html?ref=521


    Local Health Officials Warn Of Aggressive Flu
    By: Rachel Cox

    (December 19, 2013) Health officials in Bell and McLennan Counties say they’ve seen a spike in flu cases and they warned residents Thursday to get vaccinated now.

    Lacey Sanders of the Bell County Public Health District said this week alone 146 confirmed cases of flu have been reported and of those 60 involve the H1N1 virus.

    Nine people have been hospitalized since last week and health officials are investigating the death of an adult in Holland that may be related to the illness, she said...


    ...The Waco-McLennan County Public Health District reported 29 cases three weeks ago, 113 more cases two weeks ago and 344 cases last week.

    Kelly Craine with the McLennan County Public Health District said the same spike is being reported around the state and the country, but said health officials haven’t seen a comparable increase in H1N1 cases since 2009...

  • #2
    Re: Texas: Bell and McLennan Co. Health Officials Warn Of Aggressive Flu

    Doctors Warn About Jump in Flu Cases and RSV

    (KCEN) – Representatives from Scott and White, Bell County Health District and the Mclennan County Health Department held a press conference on Thursday to discuss the drastic increase in flu and RSV cases over the last few weeks.

    Lacey Sanders with Bell County says the numbers are the worst she's seen since the H1N1 outbreak in 2009. Just last week she says there were more than 200 cases test positive for the flu. They're currently investigating their first possible flu related death of the year. They say it's an adult under the age of 60 who died last week.

    Sanders says the numbers are jumping across the nation and state, with 90% of all cases in Texas being the H1N1 strain. "It is attacking quite differently than it normally did. We have a lot of people sick and hospitalized," Sanders said.

    In fact she says they've had nine people hospitalized for the flu since last week, four of which were children.

    Kelly Craine with Mclennan County says they've seen 344 positive cases of the flu just last week alone, and these numbers don't include people who do not get tested at the doctor.


    http://www.kcentv.com/story/24267508...-cases-and-rsv

    Comment


    • #3
      Texas Encourages Vigilance in Flu Treatment, Precautions (DoH, December 20 2013)

      [Source: Texas State Department of Health, full page: (LINK).]


      Texas Encourages Vigilance in Flu Treatment, Precautions

      News Release / Dec. 20, 2013


      Though recent increases in flu activity are not unusual, Texas issued flu testing and treatment guidance today to doctors and is continuing to encourage everyone to get vaccinated now to protect themselves.

      The level of flu-like illness is classified as “high” in Texas, and medical providers are seeing an increase in flu in multiple parts of the state.

      Unusually severe cases of flu-like illness are routinely investigated during the flu season by local health departments in coordination with the Texas Department of State Health Services.

      H1N1 is the most common circulating flu strain so far this season. This year’s flu vaccine includes protection against the most common flu strains, including H1N1.

      DSHS advises clinicians to consider antiviral treatment, even if an initial rapid-flu test comes back negative.

      A negative result does not exclude a diagnosis of flu in a patient with suspected illness. Antiviral treatment is recommended for anyone with confirmed or suspected flu who is hospitalized, has severe or progressive illness or is at a higher risk for complications.

      “Flu is on the rise and causing severe illness in certain people. It is not unexpected this time of year, but it’s a good reminder for people to get vaccinated and stay home if they’re sick,” said Dr. David Lakey, DSHS commissioner. “Flu can be deadly. People who have not been vaccinated should do so now. It’s the best defense we have.”

      Flu is a serious disease that kills an average of 23,600 Americans a year, according to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. People over 65, pregnant women, young children and people with chronic health conditions are most at risk for complications, so it’s especially important for them to be vaccinated.

      Flu cases and flu-related deaths in adults are not required to be reported to DSHS. Healthcare providers are required to report pediatric flu deaths to their local health department within one business day. There are no confirmed pediatric flu deaths in Texas this season.

      DSHS recommends everyone six months old and older get vaccinated. People should talk to their health care provider about the best type of flu vaccine for them. A nasal spray version is available for healthy people ages 2 to 49 who are not pregnant, and a high-dose vaccine is approved for people 65 and older.

      Dr. Lakey also urged people to follow standard illness-prevention steps:
      • Wash hands frequently with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer;
      • Cover coughs and sneezes;
      • Stay home if sick
      For more information, go to www.TexasFlu.org.

      DSHS Influenza Health Alert: www.dshs.state.tx.us/news/releases/Influenza-Health-Alert-122013.pdf

      -30-

      (Media Contact: DSHS Press Office, 512-776-7119)

      Last updated December 20, 2013


      -
      --------

      Comment


      • #4
        Texas Department of Health, Influenza Health Alert (December 20 2013)

        [Source: Texas State Department of Health, full PDF document: (LINK). Edited.]


        TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES

        DAVID L. LAKEY, M.D., COMMISSIONER

        P.O. Box 149347, Austin, Texas 78714-9347, 1-888-963-7111, TTY: 1-800-735-2989, www.dshs.state.tx.us


        **INFLUENZA HEALTH ALERT**

        December 20, 2013


        Dear Colleague:

        Statewide influenza-like illness (ILI) activity continues to increase and is above baseline levels. ILI intensity is high in Texas, and influenza is now widespread. All Texas regions have reported laboratory confirmed influenza.

        Over 90% of positive influenza tests reported from Texas laboratories have been typed as influenza A. Of those influenza A viruses that have been subtyped, 90% have been the 2009 pandemic H1N1 subtype. This subtype of influenza is included in this season's influenza vaccine.

        No novel influenza cases have been reported in Texas.

        No antiviral resistant influenza strains have been reported in Texas.
        Encourage patients to get vaccinated for influenza.

        Clinicians should consider antivirals even if the Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Test is negative.


        Background:

        Influenza viruses can be spread by large respiratory droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes in close proximity to an uninfected person. Symptoms can include fever, dry cough, sore throat, headache, body aches, fatigue, and nasal congestion. Among children, otitis media, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea are common. Most people generally recover from illness in 1-2 weeks, but some people develop complications and may die from influenza. The highest rates of influenza infection occur among children; however, the risks for serious health problems, hospitalizations, and deaths from influenza are higher among people 65 years of age or older, very young children, and people of any age who have medical conditions that place them at increased risk for complications from influenza (see Treatment).


        Vaccination:

        Everyone who is at least 6 months of age should get a flu vaccine this season. It is not too late for vaccination. There are several flu vaccine options available for the 2013-2014 flu season. All these vaccines contain the currently circulating H1N1 strain. DSHS does not recommend one flu vaccine over another, although there are special indications for some (such as a high-dose inactivated trivalent vaccine approved for persons age 65 years and older).

        The 2013-2014 trivalent influenza vaccine is made from the following three viruses:
        • An A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus
        • An A(H3N2) virus antigenically like the cell-propagated prototype virus A/Victoria/361/2011
        • A B/Massachusetts/2/2012-like virus
        The quadrivalent vaccine contains the above three viruses and a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus.


        Rapid Lab Tests:

        Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Tests (RIDTs) can be useful to identify influenza virus infection, but false negative test results are common during influenza season. Clinicians should be aware that a negative RIDT result does NOT exclude a diagnosis of influenza in a patient with suspected influenza.

        When there is clinical suspicion of influenza and antiviral treatment is indicated, antiviral treatment should be started as soon as possible, even if the result of the RIDT is negative, without waiting for results of additional influenza testing.


        Treatment:

        Oseltamivir and zanamivir are chemically related antiviral medications known as neuraminidase inhibitors that have activity against both influenza A and B viruses. Early antiviral treatment can shorten the duration of fever and illness symptoms, may reduce the risk of complications and death, and may shorten the duration of hospitalization. Clinical benefit is greatest when antiviral treatment is administered early, especially within 48 hours of influenza illness onset. Decisions about starting antiviral treatment should not wait for laboratory confirmation of influenza.

        Antiviral treatment is recommended as early as possible for any patient with confirmed or suspected influenza who
        • Is hospitalized.
        • Has severe, complicated, or progressive illness.
        • Is at higher risk for influenza complications.
        Persons at higher risk for influenza complications recommended for antiviral treatment include:
        • Children aged younger than 2 years.
        • Adults aged 65 years and older.
        • Persons with chronic pulmonary (including asthma), cardiovascular (except hypertension alone), renal, hepatic, or hematological disease (including sickle cell disease); metabolic disorders (including diabetes mellitus); or neurologic and neurodevelopment conditions (including disorders of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve, and muscle such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy [seizure disorders], stroke, intellectual disability [mental retardation], moderate to severe developmental delay, muscular dystrophy, or spinal cord injury).
        • Persons with immunosuppression, including that caused by medications or by HIV infection.
        • Women who are pregnant or postpartum (within 2 weeks after delivery).
        • Persons aged younger than 19 years who are receiving long-term aspirin therapy.
        • American Indians/Alaska Natives.
        • Persons who are morbidly obese (i.e., body-mass index is equal to or greater than 40).
        • Residents of nursing homes and other chronic-care facilities.
        Clinical judgment, on the basis of the patient's disease severity and progression, age, underlying medical conditions, likelihood of influenza, and time since onset of symptoms, is important when making antiviral treatment decisions for high-risk outpatients.

        Additional details regarding antiviral treatment can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/antivirals/summary-clinicians.htm.


        Disease Reporting Requirements/Statute:

        Several Texas laws (Health & Safety Code. Chapters 81, 84, and 87) require specific information regarding notifiable conditions to be provided to DSHS. Health care providers, hospitals, laboratories, schools, childcare facilities and others are required to report patients who are suspected of having a notifiable condition (Chapter 97, Title 25, Texas Administrative Code).

        In Texas, influenza-associated pediatric mortality is required to be reported within one work day. Clusters or outbreaks of any disease, including influenza, should be reported immediately. Reports of influenza-associated pediatric mortality and influenza or influenza-like illness outbreak should be made to your local health department or to 1-800-705-8868.

        David Lakey, M.D. Commissioner, Texas Department of State Health Services


        -
        -------

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Texas Encourages Vigilance in Flu Treatment, Precautions (DoH, December 20 2013)

          [Source: Texas State Department of Health, full PDF document: (LINK). Edited.]


          TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES

          DAVID L. LAKEY, M.D., COMMISSIONER

          P.O. Box 149347, Austin, Texas 78714-9347, 1-888-963-7111, TTY: 1-800-735-2989, www.dshs.state.tx.us


          **INFLUENZA HEALTH ALERT**

          December 20, 2013


          Dear Colleague:

          Statewide influenza-like illness (ILI) activity continues to increase and is above baseline levels. ILI intensity is high in Texas, and influenza is now widespread. All Texas regions have reported laboratory confirmed influenza.

          Over 90% of positive influenza tests reported from Texas laboratories have been typed as influenza A. Of those influenza A viruses that have been subtyped, 90% have been the 2009 pandemic H1N1 subtype. This subtype of influenza is included in this season's influenza vaccine.

          No novel influenza cases have been reported in Texas.

          No antiviral resistant influenza strains have been reported in Texas.
          Encourage patients to get vaccinated for influenza.

          Clinicians should consider antivirals even if the Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Test is negative.


          Background:

          Influenza viruses can be spread by large respiratory droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes in close proximity to an uninfected person. Symptoms can include fever, dry cough, sore throat, headache, body aches, fatigue, and nasal congestion. Among children, otitis media, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea are common. Most people generally recover from illness in 1-2 weeks, but some people develop complications and may die from influenza. The highest rates of influenza infection occur among children; however, the risks for serious health problems, hospitalizations, and deaths from influenza are higher among people 65 years of age or older, very young children, and people of any age who have medical conditions that place them at increased risk for complications from influenza (see Treatment).


          Vaccination:

          Everyone who is at least 6 months of age should get a flu vaccine this season. It is not too late for vaccination. There are several flu vaccine options available for the 2013-2014 flu season. All these vaccines contain the currently circulating H1N1 strain. DSHS does not recommend one flu vaccine over another, although there are special indications for some (such as a high-dose inactivated trivalent vaccine approved for persons age 65 years and older).

          The 2013-2014 trivalent influenza vaccine is made from the following three viruses:

          • An A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus
          • An A(H3N2) virus antigenically like the cell-propagated prototype virus A/Victoria/361/2011
          • A B/Massachusetts/2/2012-like virus
          The quadrivalent vaccine contains the above three viruses and a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus.


          Rapid Lab Tests:

          Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Tests (RIDTs) can be useful to identify influenza virus infection, but false negative test results are common during influenza season. Clinicians should be aware that a negative RIDT result does NOT exclude a diagnosis of influenza in a patient with suspected influenza.

          When there is clinical suspicion of influenza and antiviral treatment is indicated, antiviral treatment should be started as soon as possible, even if the result of the RIDT is negative, without waiting for results of additional influenza testing.


          Treatment:

          Oseltamivir and zanamivir are chemically related antiviral medications known as neuraminidase inhibitors that have activity against both influenza A and B viruses. Early antiviral treatment can shorten the duration of fever and illness symptoms, may reduce the risk of complications and death, and may shorten the duration of hospitalization. Clinical benefit is greatest when antiviral treatment is administered early, especially within 48 hours of influenza illness onset. Decisions about starting antiviral treatment should not wait for laboratory confirmation of influenza.

          Antiviral treatment is recommended as early as possible for any patient with confirmed or suspected influenza who

          • Is hospitalized.
          • Has severe, complicated, or progressive illness.
          • Is at higher risk for influenza complications.
          Persons at higher risk for influenza complications recommended for antiviral treatment include:

          • Children aged younger than 2 years.
          • Adults aged 65 years and older.
          • Persons with chronic pulmonary (including asthma), cardiovascular (except hypertension alone), renal, hepatic, or hematological disease (including sickle cell disease); metabolic disorders (including diabetes mellitus); or neurologic and neurodevelopment conditions (including disorders of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve, and muscle such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy [seizure disorders], stroke, intellectual disability [mental retardation], moderate to severe developmental delay, muscular dystrophy, or spinal cord injury).
          • Persons with immunosuppression, including that caused by medications or by HIV infection.
          • Women who are pregnant or postpartum (within 2 weeks after delivery).
          • Persons aged younger than 19 years who are receiving long-term aspirin therapy.
          • American Indians/Alaska Natives.
          • Persons who are morbidly obese (i.e., body-mass index is equal to or greater than 40).
          • Residents of nursing homes and other chronic-care facilities.
          Clinical judgment, on the basis of the patient's disease severity and progression, age, underlying medical conditions, likelihood of influenza, and time since onset of symptoms, is important when making antiviral treatment decisions for high-risk outpatients.

          Additional details regarding antiviral treatment can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/antivirals/summary-clinicians.htm.


          Disease Reporting Requirements/Statute:

          Several Texas laws (Health & Safety Code. Chapters 81, 84, and 87) require specific information regarding notifiable conditions to be provided to DSHS. Health care providers, hospitals, laboratories, schools, childcare facilities and others are required to report patients who are suspected of having a notifiable condition (Chapter 97, Title 25, Texas Administrative Code).

          In Texas, influenza-associated pediatric mortality is required to be reported within one work day. Clusters or outbreaks of any disease, including influenza, should be reported immediately. Reports of influenza-associated pediatric mortality and influenza or influenza-like illness outbreak should be made to your local health department or to 1-800-705-8868.

          David Lakey, M.D. Commissioner, Texas Department of State Health Services


          -
          -------

          Comment


          • #6
            Texas: H1N1 on the rise; second person dies in Gregg County

            Source: http://www.ketknbc.com/news/update-2...dies-from-h1n1

            UPDATE: H1N1 on the rise; second person dies in Gregg County
            POSTED: Friday, December 20, 2013 - 10:48am
            UPDATED: Friday, December 20, 2013 - 2:44pm

            Tyler (KETK) — Although the World Health Organization announced the H1N1 pandemic ended in August 2010, the virus has lingered ever since, and two deaths have been reported in East Texas: a second person died on Friday as a result of H1N1 in Gregg County, According to the Northeast Texas Public Health District.

            As of week 49, or December 2-8 of this year, more than 40 East Texas cases of H1N1 showed positive results through a "rapid test." While the rapid test is usually accurate, it can produce a false negative. Therefore, the true number of cases are not known, according to Director of Public Health Emergency Preparedness Russell Hopkins...

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Texas Encourages Vigilance in Flu Treatment, Precautions (DoH, December 20 2013)

              [Source: ProMedMail.org, full page: (LINK). Edited.]


              Published Date: 2013-12-21 19:32:56 / Subject: PRO/EDR> Influenza (67): USA (TX) H1N1 / Archive Number: 20131221.2129781

              INFLUENZA (67): USA (TEXAS) H1N1

              A ProMED-mail post http://www.promedmail.org / ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases http://www.isid.org

              Date: Fri 20 Dec 2013 / Source: Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) [summ., edited] / http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/news/releases/Influenza-Health-Alert-122013.pdf


              Influenza health alert

              Statewide influenza-like illness (ILI) activity continues to increase and is above baseline levels. ILI intensity is high in Texas, and influenza is now widespread. All Texas regions have reported laboratory confirmed influenza. Over 90 per cent of positive influenza tests reported from Texas laboratories have been typed as influenza A. Of those influenza A viruses that have been subtyped, 90 per cent have been the 2009 pandemic H1N1 subtype. This subtype of influenza is included in this season's [2013-14] influenza vaccine. No novel influenza cases have been reported in Texas. No antiviral resistant influenza strains have been reported in Texas.


              Background

              Influenza viruses can be spread by large respiratory droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes in close proximity to an uninfected person. Symptoms can include fever, dry cough, sore throat, headache, body aches, fatigue, and nasal congestion. Among children, otitis media, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea are common. Most people generally recover from illness in 1-2 weeks, but some people develop complications and may die from influenza. The highest rates of influenza infection occur among children; however, the risks for serious health problems, hospitalizations, and deaths from influenza are higher among people 65 years of age or older, very young children, and people of any age who have medical conditions that place them at increased risk for complications from influenza.


              Vaccination

              Everyone who is at least 6 months of age should get a flu vaccine this season [2013-14]. It is not too late for vaccination. There are several flu vaccine options available for the 2013-2014 flu season. All these vaccines contain the currently circulating H1N1 strain. DSHS [Department of State Health Services] does not recommend one flu vaccine over another, although there are special indications for some (such as a high-dose inactivated trivalent vaccine approved for persons age 65 years and older).


              Rapid Lab Test

              Rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs) can be useful to identify influenza virus infection, but false negative test results are common during influenza season. Clinicians should be aware that a negative RIDT result does NOT exclude a diagnosis of influenza in a patient with suspected influenza. When there is clinical suspicion of influenza and antiviral treatment is indicated, antiviral treatment should be started as soon as possible, even if the result of the RIDT is negative, without waiting for results of additional influenza testing.

              Treatment: oseltamivir and zanamivir are chemically related antiviral medications known as neuraminidase inhibitors that have activity against both influenza A and B viruses. Early antiviral treatment can shorten the duration of fever and illness symptoms, may reduce the risk of complications and death, and may shorten the duration of hospitalization. Clinical benefit is greatest when antiviral treatment is administered early, especially within 48 hours of influenza illness onset. Decisions about starting antiviral treatment should not wait for laboratory confirmation of influenza.

              Antiviral treatment is recommended as early as possible for any patient with confirmed or suspected influenza who
              - is hospitalized,
              - has severe, complicated, or progressive illness,
              - is at higher risk for influenza complications.
              Persons at higher risk for influenza complications recommended for antiviral treatment include:
              - children aged younger than 2 years,
              - adults aged 65 years and older,
              - persons with chronic pulmonary (including asthma), cardiovascular (except hypertension alone), renal, hepatic, or hematological disease (including sickle cell disease); metabolic disorders (including diabetes mellitus); or neurologic and neurodevelopment conditions (including disorders of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve, and muscle such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy [seizure disorders], stroke, intellectual disability [mental retardation], moderate to severe developmental delay, muscular dystrophy, or spinal cord injury),
              - persons with immunosuppression, including that caused by medications or by HIV infection,
              - women who are pregnant or postpartum (within 2 weeks after delivery),
              - persons aged younger than 19 years who are receiving long-term aspirin therapy.
              - American Indians/Alaska Natives.
              - persons who are morbidly obese (that is, body-mass index is equal to or greater than 40).
              - residents of nursing homes and other chronic-care facilities.

              Clinical judgment, on the basis of the patient's disease severity and progression, age, underlying medical conditions, likelihood of influenza, and time since onset of symptoms, is important when making antiviral treatment decisions for high-risk outpatients.

              Additional details regarding antiviral treatment can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/antivirals/summary-clinicians.htm.

              In Texas, influenza-associated pediatric mortality is required to be reported within one work day. Clusters or outbreaks of any disease, including influenza, should be reported immediately. Reports of influenza-associated pediatric mortality and influenza or influenza-like illness outbreak should be made to your local health department or to 1-800-705-8868.
              --
              communicated by: ProMED-mail promed@promedmail.org


              [The correspondent has added the following commentary in relation to the information above. "This outbreak now appears to involve an H1N1 virus. The vaccine inefficacy statement from the County health authorities press release highlights, coupled with the apparent unreliability of rapid diagnostic tests cited in media reports, suggests to me that H1N1 virus circulating in Texas may be a new [more virulent ?] drifted or reasserted strain. The current Texas state flu bulletin for week of 7-14 Dec 2013 issued today (20 Dec 2013) does not seem to discuss this issue http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/idcu/disease/influenza/surveillance/2014/."

              It seems likely that the fatalities observed in Texas are due to a possibly more virulent strain of the seasonal H1N1 influenza virus, rather than a novel pathogenic agent. Further information is awaited to substantiate this conclusion. - Mod.CP]

              (…)


              -
              -------

              Comment


              • #8
                18 cases of H1N1 flu in Hidalgo County

                McALLEN — There have been six confirmed Hidalgo County cases of the H1N1 virus, commonly known as swine flu, the county health director said.

                Out of the six cases, one was a child under the age of 10, one was a teenager, and the rest were adults, said Eddie Olivares, director of the Hidalgo County Health Department.

                There have been no fatalities as a result of the flu strain, he said.


                http://www.themonitor.com/news/local...a4bcf6878.html

                Comment


                • #9
                  Flu cases flooding Crossroads area doctors' offices

                  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports widespread influenza activity in Texas - and Victoria County is no exception.

                  "We have experienced an unusually high number of cases, comparable to the 2009 H1N1 outbreak," said Dr. John McNeill, owner and physician of Twin Fountains Walk-In Health Clinics. "It's safe to assume that the flu shot is working well and that not many people have had it."

                  Influenza Types A and B have been reported in the county, and the H1N1 strain, which is included in the vaccine, is probably the most common, said Dr. Bain Cate, director of the Victoria City-County Health Department.

                  "People procrastinate, but there is no good reason - except an allergy to the vaccine's ingredients - to wait," Cate said.

                  On Friday alone, McNeill confirmed 58 cases of Type A influenza at his two clinics, and the virus does not typically peak until January at the earliest.

                  ...



                  http://www.victoriaadvocate.com/news...8278/?business

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    TX: Obit: Died 12-20-13 with COPD, complicated by flu and pneumonia; M, 53 yrs.

                    Source: http://obits.dignitymemorial.com/dig...30&mid=5786203

                    In Memory of
                    Samuel Anthony Massaro III
                    February 9, 1960 - December 20, 2013
                    Obituary

                    Samuel Anthony Massaro, III, beloved son, brother and father, left earth for heaven on December 20, 2013. He was born on February 9, 1960. Sam fought his COPD, complicated by the flu and pneumonia, valiantly...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: 6 confirmed cases of H1N1 flu in Hidalgo County

                      Hidalgo County swine flu cases increase to 9; none fatal




                      McALLEN — The Hidalgo County Health Department confirmed new numbers Monday afternoon of the number of residents with the H1N1 virus — known as swine flu — and the numbers will probably increase.

                      County health Director Eddie Olivarez said that there are nine confirmed cases of people with H1N1 — six adults and three children.

                      Of the nine, no one has died, though four are currently hospitalized because they had other medical conditions that complicated their recovery, he said Monday.

                      http://www.themonitor.com/news/local...a4bcf6878.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Austin Area Hospitals See Spike In Flu Cases

                        Seton hospitals in the Austin area say they're seeing an early and more severe spike in the number of flu cases -- and there's been one H1N1 death confirmed so far in Travis County Seton officials say in the last two weeks the number of flu patients doubled from about 200 to 400 confirmed cases. And five patients with the H1N1 virus were put on a special heart-lung machine to help them breathe.

                        Read More at: http://www.keyetv.com/news/features/...es-15141.shtml

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: 6 confirmed cases of H1N1 flu in Hidalgo County

                          18 estimated cases of Influenza A-H1N1 reported in Hidalgo County

                          HIDALGO COUNTY, TX — Hidalgo County, along with the state of Texas, has seen occurrences of influenza during this year’s Influenza Season becoming more prevalent as the season progresses.

                          Hidalgo County has 18 estimated cases of Influenza A- H1N1 in the County as of December 26, 2013. There are currently 4 adults hospitalized for other medical diagnoses, which have been complicated by H1N1. This estimate is calculated from the Influenza Surveillance Program conducted by Hidalgo County Health and Human Services Department.

                          http://www.kveo.com/news/18-estimate...hidalgo-county

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: 6 confirmed cases of H1N1 flu in Hidalgo County

                            Originally posted by tetano View Post
                            18 estimated cases of Influenza A-H1N1 reported in Hidalgo County

                            HIDALGO COUNTY, TX — Hidalgo County, along with the state of Texas, has seen occurrences of influenza during this year’s Influenza Season becoming more prevalent as the season progresses.

                            Hidalgo County has 18 estimated cases of Influenza A- H1N1 in the County as of December 26, 2013. There are currently 4 adults hospitalized for other medical diagnoses, which have been complicated by H1N1. This estimate is calculated from the Influenza Surveillance Program conducted by Hidalgo County Health and Human Services Department.

                            http://www.kveo.com/news/18-estimate...hidalgo-county
                            Texas HA 225 Receptor Binding Variance Potential

                            An examination of the potential for Receptor Binding Site (RBS) Polymorphisms in the Texas High-CFR cases, including detailed near-term and mid-term genetic probabilities and projections

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              TX: Corpus Christi Shelter in Need of OTC Cold and Flu Medicines

                              Source: http://www.kiiitv.com/story/24330823...-flu-medicines

                              Shelter in Need of OTC Cold and Flu Medicines
                              Posted: Dec 30, 2013 6:17 PM EST Updated: Dec 30, 2013 6:17 PM EST

                              CORPUS CHRISTI (Kiii News) -

                              ...The shelter is in need of things to keep you warm like jackets and sweaters, but another request might surprise you -- they're also asking for things to help the homeless recover from the flu.

                              "We presently in need of cold weather clothing, beanies, socks, gloves. And big thing right now we could use is, traditional OTC the medication, cough drops. We know as you know from news reports, that the flu is hitting the city really hard right now," says Good Sam Rescue Mission Program Director Rafael Ortiz...

                              Comment

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