Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Texas: Houston area seasonal flu 2013/2014

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Texas: Houston area seasonal flu 2013/2014

    Source: http://www.digtriad.com/news/article...punter-Lechler


    Flu hospitalizes Texans punter Lechler
    4:43 PM, Nov 14, 2013
    The Sports Network

    Houston, TX (SportsNetwork.com) - As if things weren't bad enough for the 2-7 Houston Texans, the club revealed on Thursday that punter Shane Lechler has been hospitalized due to the flu.

    Texans head coach Gary Kubiak said Lechler has been out of commission for the past several days, but expects him to be released from the hospital on Friday...

  • #2
    Texas: Media report -13 deaths in the Greater Houston area linked to H1N1

    Source: http://www.kvue.com/news/Health-offi...236622341.html


    Health officials say 6 deaths linked to H1N1
    by KHOU.com staff
    KHOU
    Posted on December 19, 2013 at 4:00 PM


    HOUSTON ? Health officials say there have been six confirmed deaths from H1N1 in the Houston area recently, KVUE's sister station KHOU confirmed Thursday afternoon.

    This is the same strain of H1N1 that caused a pandemic in 2009...

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Texas: Media report - Houston Health officials say 6 deaths linked to H1N1

      H1N1 kills 6 people, leaves 14 critically ill in Greater Houston area


      HOUSTON ? Health officials say there have been six confirmed deaths from H1N1 in the Houston area recently, KHOU 11 News confirmed Thursday afternoon. That includes the four deaths at Conroe Regional Medical Center.

      At least 14 people have become critically ill in Harris, Montgomery and Jefferson counties, including the four patients at Conroe Regional Medical Center.

      This is the same strain of H1N1 that caused a pandemic in 2009. Doctors have been seeing hundreds of new cases recently in Texas and nationwide. In fact, H1N1 is one of the viruses included in this year?s flu shot.

      ..


      http://www.kvue.com/news/236657121.html

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Texas: Media report - Houston Health officials say 6 deaths linked to H1N1 - 14 critically ill

        but we don't yet know whether these 4 were H1N1
        I'm interested in expert panflu damage estimates
        my current links: http://bit.ly/hFI7H ILI-charts: http://bit.ly/CcRgT

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: USA - Texas: Public Health department confirmed H1N1pdm09 outbreak - in Houston area media report of 6 fatalities, 14 more critically ill - Montgomery county health says 2 confirmed H1N1pdm09

          Here's another likely H1N1 death. Since this one is female, it's not one of the four in question so far, which are all male.

          http://www.khou.com/news/health/Fami...236672991.html

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Texas: Media report - Houston Health officials say 6 deaths linked to H1N1 - 14 critically ill

            This person was 30 years old, and not one of the four Montgomery County fatalities. He had the classice H1N1pdm09 severe symptoms - started to recover and then got worse, cyanosis, and kidney failure, plus inconclusive rapdid flu tests.

            North Texas man dies of swine flu; could be 'mystery illness' from Houston
            by JANET ST. JAMES / WFAA
            Posted on December 19, 2013 at 9:16 AM


            EULESS, Texas -- Looking at photographs shown at her husband's funeral is so very hard for Ashley Wright.

            "He was too young,” she said. "I should not be a widow at 30... So it's pretty devastating."

            Dustin Wright, 30, came down with flu-like symptoms just before Thanksgiving. Ashley said he seemed to be getting better, before taking a sudden turn for the worse.

            "Every breath was a struggle for him,” she recalled. “Every single breath. And I woke him up at 11:30, and his lips were purple and his fingers were purple, and he was like a green color -- like he was just changing colors."

            Ashley said she insisted they go immediately to the emergency room. Dustin was admitted to Baylor Grapevine on Nov. 25, placed on life support in the ICU, and strapped into a rotating bed that helps break up fluid in the lungs from pneumonia.

            At first, flu tests were inconclusive.

            "The second time they checked him, he came back positive for Influenza A, Influenza B,” Wright said.

            Dustin suffered kidney failure, which has been associated with severe cases of H1N1 Type A, or swine flu. He had no known underlying medical conditions.

            His case has many similarities to cases in Montgomery County that puzzled doctors this week. Of eight cases in that county, four patients have died.

            more...

            http://www.khou.com/news/texas-news/...236558201.html
            "I know God will not give me anything I can't handle. I just wish that He didn't trust me so much." - Mother Teresa of Calcutta

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Texas: Media report - Houston Health officials say 6 deaths linked to H1N1 - 14 critically ill

              Young father loses battle to H1N1 virus, family warns others to get flu shot



              GREGG COUNTY, TX (KLTV) -

              Health officials have confirmed that two Gregg County residents have died from the H1N1 virus, which was just confirmed as one of the "mystery illnesses" in Montgomery County, near Houston.

              Starting Thursday, physicians are being advised to give their patients Tamiflu if they are showing flu-like symptoms. The good news is that the H1N1 virus is included in this year's flu shot, but so far, it looks like those who have died from the virus have not had the vaccination.

              David and Jeri Chapman are mourning the loss of their 37-year-old son Jeremy Chapman who lost his life to H1N1 earlier this week.

              They said their son had a great sense of humor and was a wonderful father to his 9-year-old son, Cameron.

              ...


              http://www.kltv.com/story/24267356/y...o-get-flu-shot

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Texas: Media report - Houston Health officials say 6 deaths linked to H1N1 - 14 critically ill

                First Travis County death from H1N1 confirmed


                AUSTIN -- The first confirmed death from H1N1 in Travis County is being reported by the Austin/Travis County Health and Human Services, and another death is being investigated.

                The H1N1 influenza A virus, also called the swine flu, is being suspected in the deaths of seven people across Texas. It has also critically injured 14 others.

                A 41-year-old father is one of six people who died in Houston this month, less than a week after he started feeling sick. Near Dallas a 30-year-old died after spending 10 days in the hospital.

                http://www.kvue.com/news/First-Travi...236763641.html

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Texas: Media report - Houston Health officials say 6 deaths linked to H1N1 - 14 critically ill

                  [Source: Texas State Department of Health, full page: (LINK).]


                  Texas Encourages Vigilance in Flu Treatment, Precautions

                  News Release / Dec. 20, 2013


                  Though recent increases in flu activity are not unusual, Texas issued flu testing and treatment guidance today to doctors and is continuing to encourage everyone to get vaccinated now to protect themselves.

                  The level of flu-like illness is classified as ?high? in Texas, and medical providers are seeing an increase in flu in multiple parts of the state.

                  Unusually severe cases of flu-like illness are routinely investigated during the flu season by local health departments in coordination with the Texas Department of State Health Services.

                  H1N1 is the most common circulating flu strain so far this season. This year?s flu vaccine includes protection against the most common flu strains, including H1N1.

                  DSHS advises clinicians to consider antiviral treatment, even if an initial rapid-flu test comes back negative.

                  A negative result does not exclude a diagnosis of flu in a patient with suspected illness. Antiviral treatment is recommended for anyone with confirmed or suspected flu who is hospitalized, has severe or progressive illness or is at a higher risk for complications.

                  ?Flu is on the rise and causing severe illness in certain people. It is not unexpected this time of year, but it?s a good reminder for people to get vaccinated and stay home if they?re sick,? said Dr. David Lakey, DSHS commissioner. ?Flu can be deadly. People who have not been vaccinated should do so now. It?s the best defense we have.?

                  Flu is a serious disease that kills an average of 23,600 Americans a year, according to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. People over 65, pregnant women, young children and people with chronic health conditions are most at risk for complications, so it?s especially important for them to be vaccinated.

                  Flu cases and flu-related deaths in adults are not required to be reported to DSHS. Healthcare providers are required to report pediatric flu deaths to their local health department within one business day. There are no confirmed pediatric flu deaths in Texas this season.

                  DSHS recommends everyone six months old and older get vaccinated. People should talk to their health care provider about the best type of flu vaccine for them. A nasal spray version is available for healthy people ages 2 to 49 who are not pregnant, and a high-dose vaccine is approved for people 65 and older.

                  Dr. Lakey also urged people to follow standard illness-prevention steps:

                  • Wash hands frequently with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer;
                  • Cover coughs and sneezes;
                  • Stay home if sick

                  For more information, go to www.TexasFlu.org.

                  DSHS Influenza Health Alert: www.dshs.state.tx.us/news/releases/Influenza-Health-Alert-122013.pdf

                  -30-

                  (Media Contact: DSHS Press Office, 512-776-7119)

                  Last updated December 20, 2013


                  -
                  --------

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Texas: Media report - Houston Health officials say 6 deaths linked to H1N1 - 14 critically ill

                    [Source: Texas State Department of Health, full PDF document: (LINK). Edited.]


                    TEXAS DEPARTMENT OF STATE HEALTH SERVICES

                    DAVID L. LAKEY, M.D., COMMISSIONER

                    P.O. Box 149347, Austin, Texas 78714-9347, 1-888-963-7111, TTY: 1-800-735-2989, www.dshs.state.tx.us


                    **INFLUENZA HEALTH ALERT**

                    December 20, 2013


                    Dear Colleague:

                    Statewide influenza-like illness (ILI) activity continues to increase and is above baseline levels. ILI intensity is high in Texas, and influenza is now widespread. All Texas regions have reported laboratory confirmed influenza.

                    Over 90% of positive influenza tests reported from Texas laboratories have been typed as influenza A. Of those influenza A viruses that have been subtyped, 90% have been the 2009 pandemic H1N1 subtype. This subtype of influenza is included in this season's influenza vaccine.

                    No novel influenza cases have been reported in Texas.

                    No antiviral resistant influenza strains have been reported in Texas.
                    Encourage patients to get vaccinated for influenza.

                    Clinicians should consider antivirals even if the Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Test is negative.


                    Background:

                    Influenza viruses can be spread by large respiratory droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes in close proximity to an uninfected person. Symptoms can include fever, dry cough, sore throat, headache, body aches, fatigue, and nasal congestion. Among children, otitis media, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea are common. Most people generally recover from illness in 1-2 weeks, but some people develop complications and may die from influenza. The highest rates of influenza infection occur among children; however, the risks for serious health problems, hospitalizations, and deaths from influenza are higher among people 65 years of age or older, very young children, and people of any age who have medical conditions that place them at increased risk for complications from influenza (see Treatment).


                    Vaccination:

                    Everyone who is at least 6 months of age should get a flu vaccine this season. It is not too late for vaccination. There are several flu vaccine options available for the 2013-2014 flu season. All these vaccines contain the currently circulating H1N1 strain. DSHS does not recommend one flu vaccine over another, although there are special indications for some (such as a high-dose inactivated trivalent vaccine approved for persons age 65 years and older).

                    The 2013-2014 trivalent influenza vaccine is made from the following three viruses:

                    • An A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus
                    • An A(H3N2) virus antigenically like the cell-propagated prototype virus A/Victoria/361/2011
                    • A B/Massachusetts/2/2012-like virus

                    The quadrivalent vaccine contains the above three viruses and a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus.


                    Rapid Lab Tests:

                    Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Tests (RIDTs) can be useful to identify influenza virus infection, but false negative test results are common during influenza season. Clinicians should be aware that a negative RIDT result does NOT exclude a diagnosis of influenza in a patient with suspected influenza.

                    When there is clinical suspicion of influenza and antiviral treatment is indicated, antiviral treatment should be started as soon as possible, even if the result of the RIDT is negative, without waiting for results of additional influenza testing.


                    Treatment:

                    Oseltamivir and zanamivir are chemically related antiviral medications known as neuraminidase inhibitors that have activity against both influenza A and B viruses. Early antiviral treatment can shorten the duration of fever and illness symptoms, may reduce the risk of complications and death, and may shorten the duration of hospitalization. Clinical benefit is greatest when antiviral treatment is administered early, especially within 48 hours of influenza illness onset. Decisions about starting antiviral treatment should not wait for laboratory confirmation of influenza.

                    Antiviral treatment is recommended as early as possible for any patient with confirmed or suspected influenza who

                    • Is hospitalized.
                    • Has severe, complicated, or progressive illness.
                    • Is at higher risk for influenza complications.

                    Persons at higher risk for influenza complications recommended for antiviral treatment include:

                    • Children aged younger than 2 years.
                    • Adults aged 65 years and older.
                    • Persons with chronic pulmonary (including asthma), cardiovascular (except hypertension alone), renal, hepatic, or hematological disease (including sickle cell disease); metabolic disorders (including diabetes mellitus); or neurologic and neurodevelopment conditions (including disorders of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve, and muscle such as cerebral palsy, epilepsy [seizure disorders], stroke, intellectual disability [mental retardation], moderate to severe developmental delay, muscular dystrophy, or spinal cord injury).
                    • Persons with immunosuppression, including that caused by medications or by HIV infection.
                    • Women who are pregnant or postpartum (within 2 weeks after delivery).
                    • Persons aged younger than 19 years who are receiving long-term aspirin therapy.
                    • American Indians/Alaska Natives.
                    • Persons who are morbidly obese (i.e., body-mass index is equal to or greater than 40).
                    • Residents of nursing homes and other chronic-care facilities.

                    Clinical judgment, on the basis of the patient's disease severity and progression, age, underlying medical conditions, likelihood of influenza, and time since onset of symptoms, is important when making antiviral treatment decisions for high-risk outpatients.

                    Additional details regarding antiviral treatment can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/antivirals/summary-clinicians.htm.


                    Disease Reporting Requirements/Statute:

                    Several Texas laws (Health & Safety Code. Chapters 81, 84, and 87) require specific information regarding notifiable conditions to be provided to DSHS. Health care providers, hospitals, laboratories, schools, childcare facilities and others are required to report patients who are suspected of having a notifiable condition (Chapter 97, Title 25, Texas Administrative Code).

                    In Texas, influenza-associated pediatric mortality is required to be reported within one work day. Clusters or outbreaks of any disease, including influenza, should be reported immediately. Reports of influenza-associated pediatric mortality and influenza or influenza-like illness outbreak should be made to your local health department or to 1-800-705-8868.

                    David Lakey, M.D. Commissioner, Texas Department of State Health Services


                    -
                    -------

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Texas: Media report - Houston Health officials say 6 deaths linked to H1N1 - 14 critically ill

                      UPDATE: H1N1 on the rise; second person dies in Gregg County

                      Tyler (KETK) — Although the World Health Organization announced the H1N1 pandemic ended in August 2010, the virus has lingered ever since, and two deaths have been reported in East Texas: a second person died on Friday as a result of H1N1 in Gregg County, According to the Northeast Texas Public Health District.

                      As of week 49, or December 2-8 of this year, more than 40 East Texas cases of H1N1 showed positive results through a "rapid test." While the rapid test is usually accurate, it can produce a false negative. Therefore, the true number of cases are not known, according to Director of Public Health Emergency Preparedness Russell Hopkins.

                      Hopkins believes the dramatic increase in H1N1 can be attributed to several factors.

                      ...

                      There are also cases in the Beaumont area that have not yet been sequenced in a lab, but are suspected to be the deadly strain.

                      http://www.ketknbc.com/news/update-2...dies-from-h1n1

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Texas: Media report - Houston Health officials say 6 deaths linked to H1N1 - 14 critically ill

                        [Source: ProMedMail.org, full page: (LINK).]


                        Published Date: 2013-12-20 14:52:34 / Subject: PRO/EDR> Undiagnosed respiratory illness - USA (02): (TX) fatal, H1N1 influenza conf / Archive Number: 20131220.2127835

                        UNDIAGNOSED RESPIRATORY ILLNESS - USA (02): (TEXAS) FATAL, H1N1 INFLUENZA CONFIRMED

                        A ProMED-mail post http://www.promedmail.org / ProMED-mail is a program of the International Society for Infectious Diseases http://www.isid.org

                        [1] Date: Thu 19 Dec 2013 / Source: KHOU 11 News [edited] http://www.khou.com/news/local/BREAKING-Houston-area-health-officials-say-6-deaths-linked-to-H1N1-236620791.html

                        Health officials say there have been 6 confirmed deaths from H1N1 [influenza virus infection] in the Houston area recently, KHOU 11 News confirmed on Thursday afternoon [19 Nov 2013]. That includes the 4 deaths at Conroe Regional Medical Center. At least 14 people have become critically ill in Harris, Montgomery, and Jefferson counties, including the 4 patients at Conroe Regional Medical Center. This is the same strain of H1N1 that caused a pandemic in 2009. Doctors have been seeing hundreds of new cases recently in Texas and nationwide. In fact, H1N1 is one of the viruses included in this year's [2013] flu shot. Health officials from all over the region spent Thursday afternoon in a conference call comparing notes about all the cases. They suspect that all of the cases at the Conroe Regional Medical Center are H1N1, or what used to be called the "swine flu".

                        Officials in Montgomery County, which is where this all started, are meeting to formulate further plans. All the jurisdictions in the region are working together to create a profile of these cases, so doctors know what to look out for. That will be shared with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Texas Department of Health. CDC has already offered assistance on this cluster of cases. The illnesses started with flu-like symptoms, then progressed to pneumonia and, in some cases, organ failure. All of the patients initially tested negative for the flu. News about the illness has people packing into doctors' offices and clinics. At the Conroe Urgent Care Clinic Thursday [19 Dec 2013], at least 18 patients came in with flu-like symptoms. "We're testing at least 5 to 7 people positive for H1N1 [daily] as opposed to October [2013] when we hardly had any," said physician assistant Derrick Goodwill.

                        The commonly used rapid flu test is not very reliable. "The recommendation right now is to give Tamiflu to patients even if they don't test positive," Goodwill said. That is also why Montgomery County health officials now plan to use a more reliable, but costly and time-consuming test on those patients sick from the "mystery" bug and those who died from it.

                        [byline: Jeremy Desel]
                        --
                        communicated by: ProMED-mail rapporteur Mary Marshall and Ryan McGinnis ryan@bigstormpicture.com

                        ******

                        [2] Date: Thu 19 Dec 2013 / Source: MCHD (Montgomery County Hospital District & Public Health District) press release [edited] http://www.mchd-tx.org/

                        Influenza-like illness arises in Montgomery County -- update
                        ------------------------------------------------------------
                        As of Thursday [19 Dec 2013] afternoon, one additional case of H1N1 has been confirmed in Montgomery County. This patient is currently in an area hospital receiving treatment. Lab [tests] are being repeated on all remaining cases by CDC. There are currently 2 confirmed H1N1 cases in Montgomery County.

                        The Montgomery County Public Health District is coordinating with regional and state resources to manage the case investigations. Health officials continue to encourage the public to be vaccinated for [seasonal] flu, especially those who are at high risk. Montgomery County Public Health District is monitoring the situation closely and will provide more information as it arises.

                        It is also recommended that [all residents] receive a flu shot. Montgomery County Public Health Clinic is offering the vaccination by appointment, while supplies last. Call (936) 523-5020 to set up an appointment. For any other questions or concerns, please contact the Public Health hotline at (936) 523-5050. The line will be staffed Monday thru Friday 8 am-5 pm, it is for non-media inquiries only.
                        --
                        communicated by: ProMED-mail promed@promedmail.org


                        [The state of Texas can be located on the HealthMap/ProMED-mail interactive map at http://healthmap.org/r/9yHr. A county map can be seen at http://geology.com/county-map/texas.shtml. Montgomery County is located in eastern Texas, within the Houston-Woodlands-Sugar Land metropolitan area. As of the 2010 census, its population was 455 746. A 55 per cent growth rate in the 10 years from the last US census make the county the 24th fastest-growing county in the United States. The seat of the county is Conroe.

                        In an initial press report of this outbreak it was stated that influenza virus infection tests had been negative. Subsequently it was reported that one of the patients had tested positive for H1N1 influenza virus infection, but this patient was not one of the fatal cases (http://abclocal.go.com/ktrk/story?section=news/health&id=9365327 ).

                        Further testing has now revealed that most of the initial group of patients appears to have been infected with the H1N1pdm09 strain of influenza virus.

                        Further information is awaited to confirm these findings and reveal the extent of H1N1 virus infection in the general population.

                        The H1N1 component of the current northern hemisphere vaccine is expected to be well matched with the circulating virus and it is surprising that this virus has been so lethal. - Mod.CP]

                        (?)


                        -
                        -------

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Texas: Media report - Houston Health officials say 6 deaths linked to H1N1 - 14 critically ill

                          Originally posted by tetano View Post
                          UPDATE: H1N1 on the rise; second person dies in Gregg County

                          Tyler (KETK) ? Although the World Health Organization announced the H1N1 pandemic ended in August 2010, the virus has lingered ever since, and two deaths have been reported in East Texas: a second person died on Friday as a result of H1N1 in Gregg County, According to the Northeast Texas Public Health District.

                          As of week 49, or December 2-8 of this year, more than 40 East Texas cases of H1N1 showed positive results through a "rapid test." While the rapid test is usually accurate, it can produce a false negative. Therefore, the true number of cases are not known, according to Director of Public Health Emergency Preparedness Russell Hopkins.

                          Hopkins believes the dramatic increase in H1N1 can be attributed to several factors.

                          ...

                          There are also cases in the Beaumont area that have not yet been sequenced in a lab, but are suspected to be the deadly strain.

                          http://www.ketknbc.com/news/update-2...dies-from-h1n1
                          I didn't think rapid tests could identify H1N1, just A or B types.

                          http://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals.../rapidclin.htm
                          _____________________________________________

                          Ask Congress to Investigate COVID Origins and Government Response to Pandemic H.R. 834

                          i love myself. the quietest. simplest. most powerful. revolution ever. ---- nayyirah waheed
                          Governments don't have or own souls.

                          (My posts are not intended as advice or professional assessments of any kind.)
                          Never forget Excalibur.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Two of the three Harris County H1N1 deaths had significant underlying health conditions

                            http://www.chron.com/news/houston-te...p?cmpid=bnaros
                            H1N1 confirmed in 3 Harris Co. deaths
                            By Anita Hassan | December 20, 2013 | Updated: December 20, 2013 4:25pm

                            The first three deaths from H1N1 virus have been confirmed in Houston, officials with the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences said Friday.

                            Test results returned Friday that showed the cause of death for three men, ages 45, 50 and 53, was the H1N1 influenza virus, said the agency's spokeswoman Tricia Bentley. One man died Nov. 28, another died the next day and the last man died on Dec. 9.

                            Two of the three had significant underlying health conditions including hypertensive cardiovascular disease and obesity, she said.

                            People with underlying health conditions are at more risk of developing complications from the flu, including death, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...
                            _____________________________________________

                            Ask Congress to Investigate COVID Origins and Government Response to Pandemic H.R. 834

                            i love myself. the quietest. simplest. most powerful. revolution ever. ---- nayyirah waheed
                            Governments don't have or own souls.

                            (My posts are not intended as advice or professional assessments of any kind.)
                            Never forget Excalibur.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Two of the three Harris County H1N1 deaths had significant underlying health conditions

                              H1N1 confirmed in at least 3 Harris deaths

                              ...


                              The death confirmations come after Montgomery County officials confirmed their second case of H1N1 virus earlier this week. The unidentified patient is being treated at an area hospital, spokeswoman Jennifer Nichols-Contella said in a written statement. Officials are also performing further testing in six other cases, including the deaths of four people who suffered flu-like symptoms.

                              Texas public health officials say every region of the state, including Montgomery and Harris counties, is seeing intense flu activity this season, which could result, as in past years, in at least several hundred deaths.

                              In Harris County, hospital emergency room visits for flu-like symptoms are at a five-year high.

                              http://www.chron.com/news/health/art...hs-5082754.php

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X