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Tennessee Lenoir City School gets first case of H1N1 virus

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  • Tennessee Lenoir City School gets first case of H1N1 virus

    Posted: 5:55 PM Aug 17, 2009

    Lenoir City School gets first case of H1N1 virus
    New standards aren't the only thing Tennessee schools have to deal with this year. Parents, teachers and students are facing down the H1N1 virus.
    Reporter: Stephen McLamb



    LENOIR CITY, Tenn. (WVLT) -- New standards aren't the only thing Tennessee schools have to deal with this year.

    Parents, teachers and students are facing down the H1N1 virus.

    It's already hit small town east Tennessee, after a Lenoir City Elementary student was diagnosed with the virus.

    School chief Wayne Miller says they took immediate steps to clean the schools after a parent told them their child had the virus.

    But they're also taking followup steps to keep the kids safe that are still at school.

    While there's no such thing as one hundred percent safe, Miller hopes he's as close to it as you can get.

    "It does concern me but I didn't know there was any kind of outbreak on it," says parent, Dave Lewis.

    Shock and surprise for some Lenoir City Elementary parents after learning their school system now has it's first case of the H1N1 virus.

    "Somebody at work said they had heard there was a case of swine flu that popped up and I went, Oh, this isn't good," says Diane Sams, a parent.

    But in small towns news travels fast.

    School officials say the case involves a boy in the younger grades at the elementary school.

    "We'd spent most of the summer talking about this was going to happen. So, while we'd hoped it never would, it's not a surprise." says School Superintendent Wayne Miller.

    Miller says they took immediate action after school Friday to clean the whole school and all of the buses.

    "It's actually a fogging device. It's considerably more effective than trying to wipe things down," says Miller.

    But can school officials keep your children safe?

    "They usually do. This is a pretty good system and they usually are very up on top of things," says Sams.

    Miller says they've enacted a plan for all school officials to keep watch of children with fevers and not allow them back into the school until at least 24 hours after their fever has broke and they are no longer on medication.

    "Unfortunately there may be some cases where we don't let kids come back for the safety of all the other students," says Miller.

    Miller hopes their actions will comfort the feelings of even the most concerned parents.

    "What I can guarantee is this. We treat all of them like they're our own and these schools are as clean an environment as I've ever seen." says Miller.

    Miller says they plan to continue fogging the schools as often as the manufacturer recommends to keep them clean.

    http://www.volunteertv.com/news/headlines/53499327.html
    "Safety and security don't just happen, they are the result of collective consensus and public investment. We owe our children, the most vulnerable citizens in our society, a life free of violence and fear."
    -Nelson Mandela
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