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  • A flu hits Phoenix Elementary 191 out Monday

    http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/s...8/daily24.html

    Lowell Elementary in south Phoenix will be closed Wednesday, Thursday and Friday because of a flu outbreak among middle school children, a school official said Tuesday.

    Lowell had 123 students call in sick Monday and sent another 71 home with fevers and other flu-like symptoms, the representative said. Lowell has 666 students in kindergarten through eighth grades. Teachers and administrators contacted parents about the flu outbreak with all students being sent home Tuesday. Only one student in school as of Tuesday morning, the school official said.

    The school is being shut down as a precaution to younger students and students’ and staff’s families. There is no indication whether the Lowell flu cases are of the H1N1 swine flu strain. The school is located off of Buckeye Road and Third Avenue just south of downtown Phoenix. Lowell is scheduled to reopen May 26.

    As of Tuesday morning, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control reported 488 confirmed H1N1 flu cases in Arizona and close to 5,500 across the U.S. Two people in Arizona have died from the H1N1, according to the CDC.

  • #2
    Re: A flu hits Phoenix Elementary 191 out Monday

    Two people in Arizona have died from the H1N1, according to the CDC.
    There's still no outside confirmation of that that I have seen.
    Wotan (pronounced Voton with the ton rhyming with on) - The German Odin, ruler of the Aesir.

    I am not a doctor, virologist, biologist, etc. I am a layman with a background in the physical sciences.

    Attempting to blog an nascent pandemic: Diary of a Flu Year

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: A flu hits Phoenix Elementary 191 out Monday

      Maybe they have decided that outside of NYC the Government and reporters don't feel that it is important.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: A flu hits Phoenix Elementary 191 out Monday

        <TABLE class=table style="MARGIN-TOP: 15px" cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=3 width=310 align=right border=1><CAPTION>Table. U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
        (As of May 19, 2009, 11:00 AM ET) </CAPTION><TBODY><TR><TH vAlign=top scope=col noWrap>States*</TH><TH vAlign=top scope=col>Confirmed and Probable Cases</TH><TH vAlign=top scope=col colSpan=2>Deaths</TH></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Alabama
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        61 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Arkansas
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        3 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Arizona
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        488 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        2 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        California
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        553 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Colorado
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        56 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Connecticut
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        56 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Delaware
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        69 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Florida
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        103 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Georgia
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        25 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Hawaii
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        21 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Idaho
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        8 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Illinois
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        707 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Indiana
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        96 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Iowa
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        71 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Kansas
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        34 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Kentucky**
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        16 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Louisiana
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        65 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Maine
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        10 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Maryland
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        39 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Massachusetts
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        156 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Michigan
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        165 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Minnesota
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        38 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Mississippi
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        4 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Missouri
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        20 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Montana
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        9 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Nebraska
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        28 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Nevada
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        31 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        New Hampshire
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        20 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        New Jersey
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        18 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        New Mexico
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        68 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        New York
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        267 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        North Carolina
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        12 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        North Dakota
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        3 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Ohio
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        13 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Oklahoma
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        42 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Oregon
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        94 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Pennsylvania
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        55 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Rhode Island
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        8 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        South Carolina
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        36 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        South Dakota
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        4 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Tennessee
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        85 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Texas
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        556 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        3 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Utah
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        91 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Vermont
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        1 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Virginia
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        23 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Washington
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        362 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        1 death
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Washington, D.C.
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        13 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
        Wisconsin
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top align=middle>
        766 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top colSpan=2>
        0 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=#ebebeb>
        TOTAL*(48)
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top noWrap bgColor=#ebebeb>
        5,469 cases
        </TD><TD class=tablesmalltext vAlign=top noWrap bgColor=#ebebeb colSpan=2>
        6 deaths
        </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top colSpan=4>*includes the District of Columbia
        **one case is resident of KY but currently hospitalized in GA.
        This table will be updated daily Monday-Friday at around 11 AM ET.
        International Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection
        See: World Health Organization.
        NOTE: Because of daily reporting deadlines, the state totals reported by CDC may not always be consistent with those reported by state health departments. If there is a discrepancy between these two counts, data from the state health departments should be used as the most accurate number.

        </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
        Summary of Situation

        A New Influenza Virus

        Novel influenza A (H1N1) is a new flu virus of swine origin that was first detected in April, 2009. The virus is infecting people and is spreading from person-to-person, sparking a growing outbreak of illness in the United States. An increasing number of cases are being reported internationally as well.
        It’s thought that novel influenza A (H1N1) flu spreads in the same way that regular seasonal influenza viruses spread; mainly through the coughs and sneezes of people who are sick with the virus.
        It’s uncertain at this time how severe this novel H1N1 outbreak will be in terms of illness and death compared with other influenza viruses. Because this is a new virus, most people will not have immunity to it, and illness may be more severe and widespread as a result. In addition, currently there is no vaccine to protect against this novel H1N1 virus. CDC anticipates that there will be more cases, more hospitalizations and more deaths associated with this new virus in the coming days and weeks.
        Novel influenza A (H1N1) activity is now being detected through CDC’s routine influenza surveillance systems and reported weekly in FluView. CDC tracks U.S. influenza activity through multiple systems across five categories. The fact that novel H1N1 activity can now be monitored through seasonal surveillance systems is an indication that there are higher levels of influenza-like illness in the United States than is normal for this time of year. About half of all influenza viruses being detected are novel H1N1 viruses.
        CDC Response

        CDC continues to take aggressive action to respond to the outbreak. CDC’s response goals are to reduce the spread and severity of illness, and to provide information to help health care providers, public health officials and the public address the challenges posed by this new public health threat.
        CDC is issuing updated interim guidance daily in response to the rapidly evolving situation.
        Clinician Guidance

        CDC has issued interim guidance for clinicians on identifying and caring for patients with novel H1N1, in addition to providing interim guidance on the use of antiviral drugs. Influenza antiviral drugs are prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaler) with activity against influenza viruses, including novel influenza H1N1 viruses. The priority use for influenza antiviral drugs during this outbreak is to treat severe influenza illness, including people who are hospitalized or sick people who are considered at high risk of serious influenza-related complications.
        Public Guidance

        In addition, CDC has provided guidance for the public on what to do if they become sick with flu-like symptoms, including infection with novel H1N1. CDC also has issued instructions on taking care of a sick person at home. Novel H1N1 infection has been reported to cause a wide range of symptoms, including fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. In addition, a significant number of people also have reported nausea, vomiting or diarrhea. Everyone should take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs, including frequent hand washing and people who are sick should stay home and avoid contact with others in order to limit further spread of the disease.
        Testing

        CDC has developed a PCR diagnostic test kit to detect this novel H1N1 virus and has now distributed test kits to all states in the U.S. and the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. The test kits are being shipped internationally as well. This will allow states and other countries to test for this new virus. This increase in testing will likely result in an increase in the number of confirmed cases of illness reported. This, combined with ongoing monitoring through Flu View should provide a fuller picture of the burden of disease in the United States over time.

        <!-- mobile syndication block 1 end-->See also the FluView Surveillance Report for the week ending May 9, 2009.
        More on the Situation
        http://cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htm

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: A flu hits Phoenix Elementary 191 out Monday

          Originally posted by Skatman View Post
          Maybe they have decided that outside of NYC the Government and reporters don't feel that it is important.
          Sadly, I would not be surprised.
          Wotan (pronounced Voton with the ton rhyming with on) - The German Odin, ruler of the Aesir.

          I am not a doctor, virologist, biologist, etc. I am a layman with a background in the physical sciences.

          Attempting to blog an nascent pandemic: Diary of a Flu Year

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: A flu hits Phoenix Elementary 191 out Monday

            I know its in the CDC report, but there are no news articles anyone has found yet discussing it. Since the CDC does not report the assistant VP in New York who died over the weekend, I would not be surprised if this was a clerical error. (Reporting the NY death in AZ.)
            Wotan (pronounced Voton with the ton rhyming with on) - The German Odin, ruler of the Aesir.

            I am not a doctor, virologist, biologist, etc. I am a layman with a background in the physical sciences.

            Attempting to blog an nascent pandemic: Diary of a Flu Year

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: A flu hits Phoenix Elementary 191 out Monday

              <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=620 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD width="40%">NEWS</TD><TD width="20%"> </TD><TD width="40%">
              for immediate release
              </TD></TR><TR bgColor=#333333 height=3><TD height=3></TD><TD height=3></TD><TD height=3></TD></TR><TR bgColor=#e3e3e3><TD bgColor=#e3e3e3></TD><TD> </TD><TD bgColor=#e3e3e3>MARICOPA COUNTY
              Public Health
              4041 N. Central Ave , Suite 1400
              Phoenix, AZ 85012
              Ph 602-506-6900

              www.maricopa.gov </TD></TR><TR bgColor=#333333 height=3><TD height=3></TD><TD height=3></TD><TD height=3></TD></TR><TR><TD height=30></TD><TD height=30></TD><TD height=30></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
              </TD></TR><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=10 width=620 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Maricopa County Reports 1st Death involving Novel H1N1 Flu
              <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" /><st1:place w:st="on"><st1:PlaceName w:st="on">MARICOPA</st1:PlaceName> <st1:PlaceType w:st="on">COUNTY</st1:PlaceType></st1:place> REPORTS First Death <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>
              Involving Novel H1N1 FLu (Swine Flu) <o:p></o:p>
              PHOENIX (May 14, 2009) – Maricopa County Department of Public Health and the Arizona Department of Health Services confirmed today that a woman in her late 40’s with underlying lung disease died last week from complications of Novel H1N1 Influenza (Swine Flu). This is the first death in <st1:State w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Arizona</st1:place></st1:State> associated with the new flu strain and the fourth in the nation.
              <o:p></o:p>
              “Unfortunately, we knew this was coming. Flu is serious, especially for those with underlying health conditions,” said Dr. Bob England, director of Maricopa Department of Public Health. “However, I need to emphasize that this death does not change our course of action here in <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:PlaceName w:st="on">Maricopa</st1:PlaceName> <st1:PlaceType w:st="on">County</st1:PlaceType></st1:place>.”
              <o:p></o:p>
              “The only way we get through any infectious disease is by working together - keep our kids home when they are sick, stay home from work when we are sick, cover our coughs and keep our hands washed. Sounds simple, but for some of us, these small actions can make all the difference.”
              <o:p></o:p>
              The new H1N1 strain of swine flu has been similar to seasonal flu in symptoms, spread, and response to treatment. Typically, people with existing health conditions are at greater risk of serious health effects from influenza.
              <o:p></o:p>
              “While this marks the first death in our state related to swine flu, the case counts are expected to continue rising for some time to come.” said Will Humble, acting director of the Arizona Department of Health Services. “And while most illnesses from this new flu strain have been fairly mild, we must remember that influenza claims about 36,000 lives every year nationwide. That's why we urge people to take this outbreak, and the seasonal flu we see every year, very seriously.”
              <o:p></o:p>
              So far <st1:State w:st="on">Arizona</st1:State> has confirmed 240 cases of Novel H1N1 Influenza (Swine Flu); 151 of those have been confirmed in <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:PlaceName w:st="on">Maricopa</st1:PlaceName> <st1:PlaceType w:st="on">County</st1:PlaceType></st1:place>.
              <o:p></o:p>
              Internationally, there have been more than 6,497 confirmed cases of swine flu in 33 countries. There have been 64 deaths in <st1:country-region w:st="on">Mexico</st1:country-region>, four <st1:country-region w:st="on">U.S.</st1:country-region> deaths and one each in <st1:country-region w:st="on">Canada</st1:country-region> and <st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Costa Rica</st1:place></st1:country-region>.<o:p></o:p>
              <o:p> </o:p>
              For preparedness information, http://www.wearepublichealth.org<o:p></o:p>
              For more information about Swine Flu, http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/<o:p></o:p>
              For Statewide Information, http://www.azdhs.gov-<o:p></o:p>
              Follow us on Twitter - http://twitter.com/Maricopahealth<o:p></o:p>
              </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
              http://www.maricopa.gov/pr_detail.aspx?releaseID=1104

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: A flu hits Phoenix Elementary 191 out Monday

                <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=620 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD width="40%">NEWS</TD><TD width="20%"> </TD><TD width="40%">
                for immediate release
                </TD></TR><TR bgColor=#333333 height=3><TD height=3></TD><TD height=3></TD><TD height=3></TD></TR><TR bgColor=#e3e3e3><TD bgColor=#e3e3e3></TD><TD> </TD><TD bgColor=#e3e3e3>MARICOPA COUNTY
                Public Health
                4041 N. Central Ave , Suite 1400
                Phoenix, AZ 85012
                Ph 602-506-6900

                www.maricopa.gov </TD></TR><TR bgColor=#333333 height=3><TD height=3></TD><TD height=3></TD><TD height=3></TD></TR><TR><TD height=30></TD><TD height=30></TD><TD height=30></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
                </TD></TR><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=10 width=620 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Lowell Elem Closes due to High Rate Influenza Like Illness
                Media Contact: Jeanene Fowler, Public Health: 602-722-1806 (c)<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>
                Sara Bresnahan, <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" /><st1:place w:st="on"><st1:PlaceName w:st="on">Lowell</st1:PlaceName> <st1:PlaceType w:st="on">Elementary School</st1:PlaceType></st1:place>: 602-549-4763 (c)<o:p></o:p>
                <o:p></o:p>
                <st1:City w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">LOWELL</st1:place></st1:City> ELEMENTARY CLOSES DUE TO HIGH RATE OF INFLUENZA LIKE ILLNESS<o:p></o:p>
                PHOENIX (May 19, 2009) – Today, the Maricopa County Department of Public Health in cooperation with Phoenix Elementary School District has closed Lowell Elementary School until May 26, 2009 due to a high rate of influenza like illness.
                <o:p></o:p>
                “Through enhanced surveillance and a stellar school nurse, we learned that the school was experiencing a much higher than normal rate of absenteeism due to illness that looks like flu,” said Dr. Bob England, director of Maricopa Department of Public Health.
                <o:p></o:p>
                “I said that we would watch schools closely for signs of a local outbreak and would act as necessary on a case by case basis. After talking with school officials, we all agreed that as a precaution and to limit the further spread of illness, we would close the school until after the Memorial Day holiday.”<o:p></o:p>
                <o:p> </o:p>
                With the novel H1N1 influenza (Swine Flu) and seasonal flu behaving much the same way, it is not recommended to test students already home with mild illness; therefore, it is likely that the particular strain of flu will remain unknown.<o:p></o:p>
                <o:p> </o:p>
                “As I’ve said over the last few weeks, as long as the novel H1N1 influenza continues to look like seasonal flu, there is no need to continue testing what we already know; flu is here in our community.”<o:p></o:p>
                <o:p> </o:p>
                “Our healthcare community is seeing cases of both types of influenza; seasonal and H1N1. This is why the community and public health must continue to be vigilant; sometimes, that means having to close a school as a precaution.” <o:p></o:p>
                <o:p> </o:p>
                Tips to lessen the spread of flu in your home include:<o:p></o:p>
                <o:p> </o:p>
                · Keep the sick person away from other people as much as possible<o:p></o:p>
                <o:p> </o:p>
                · Remind the sick person to cover their coughs, and clean their hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub often, especially after coughing and/or sneezing <o:p></o:p>
                <o:p> </o:p>
                · Have everyone in the household clean their hands often, using soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub<o:p></o:p>
                <o:p> </o:p>
                For more information, visit <st1:place w:st="on"><st1:PlaceName w:st="on">Maricopa</st1:PlaceName> <st1:PlaceType w:st="on">County</st1:PlaceType></st1:place>’s Department of Public Health website at www.wearepublichealth.org, call Community Information and Referral at 602-263-8856 (Se Habla Espanol) or follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/maricopahealth.<o:p></o:p>
                <o:p> </o:p>
                # # #<o:p></o:p>
                </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
                http://www.maricopa.gov/pr_detail.aspx?releaseID=1109

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: A flu hits Phoenix Elementary 191 out Monday

                  This still does not talk about the 2nd Arizona death.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: A flu hits Phoenix Elementary 191 out Monday

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                    1. <LI class="hentry status u-Maricopahealth latest-status" id=status_1849146833 done15="9" done13="9" done11="9" done7="9" done6="9">Now is the time to take good care of yourself; help a neighbor, children, community. Wash your hands thoroughly, stay home if you are sick. environ 2 heures ago from web <LI class="hentry status u-Maricopahealth" id=status_1849131719 done15="10" done13="10" done11="10" done7="10" done6="10">Lowell Elem is closed for high number of absenses due to Flu Like Illness www.wearepublichealth.org environ 2 heures ago from web <LI class="hentry status u-Maricopahealth" id=status_1809714247 done15="12" done13="12" done11="12" done7="12" done6="12">Today, CDC lifts travel advisory to Mexico but asks for travelers to remain aware http://wwwn.cdc.gov/travel/...1:10 PM May 15th from web <LI class="hentry status u-Maricopahealth" id=status_1799604063 done15="14" done13="14" done11="14" done7="14" done6="14">Dr. Bob reminds us that small actions can make all the difference. Stay home if you are ill and wash your hands, thorougly.3:07 PM May 14th from web <LI class="hentry status u-Maricopahealth" id=status_1799571457 done15="15" done13="15" done11="15" done7="15" done6="15">Maricopa County annouces 1st swine flu death www.wearepublichealth.org *H1N13:03 PM May 14th from web <LI class="hentry status u-Maricopahealth" id=status_1789155170 done15="17" done13="17" done11="17" done7="17" done6="17">Business planning tools for H1N1 or other influenza outbreak http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/... *H1N14:04 PM May 13th from web <LI class="hentry status u-Maricopahealth" id=status_1764222310 done15="19" done13="19" done11="19" done7="19" done6="19">Updated guidance f5-11-09 for academic institutions re: H1N1 http://bit.ly/HQz4a9:05 AM May 11th from web
                    2. Today, remember 2 wash your hands thoroughly . Help your kids too. www.wearepublichealth.org 4 hand hygiene guides, stickers too!9:07 AM May 8th from web

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                    • #11
                      Re: A flu hits Phoenix Elementary 191 out Monday

                      <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD width="100%" colSpan=3>Swine Flu May Have Infected More Than 100,000 Americans
                      <!--p>HEALTHDAY NEWS
                      17-May-2009
                      </p--><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=215 align=left border=0><TBODY><TR><TD width=15><!-- spacer cell --></TD><TD width=200><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2 width=180 align=left border=0><TBODY><TR vAlign=center>Related News from HealthDay </TR><TR vAlign=top><TD><!-- ##WIDGET LINKS START## --><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=1 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top width=6></TD><TD vAlign=top>Health Tip: Help Protect Young Athletes</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top width=6></TD><TD vAlign=top>Spread of Swine Flu in Japan Could Raise WHO Alert to Highest Level</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top width=6></TD><TD vAlign=top>New Methods Could Speed Production of Flu Vaccines</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top width=6></TD><TD vAlign=top>Adequate Supply of Swine Flu Vaccine Uncertain</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top width=6></TD><TD vAlign=top>Study Cites Gains in Gall Bladder Cancer Treatment</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top width=6></TD><TD vAlign=top>Health Tip: Choosing Baby’s Playpen</TD></TR><TR><TD align=right colSpan=2>Health News Archives</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><!-- ##WIDGET LINKS END## --></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD width=15></TD><TD width=200></TD></TR><TR><TD width=15> </TD><TD width=200> </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>SUNDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- While the official tally of confirmed U.S. swine flu cases topped 4,700 on Friday, experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now estimate the true number of infections at more than 100,000 nationwide.
                      Also on Friday, health officials announced two new deaths linked to the H1N1 virus, bringing the nationwide total to five.
                      "Today we had our fourth death reported from Maricopa County in Arizona," Dr. Daniel Jernigan, from CDC's Influenza Division, said during an afternoon teleconference Friday. "There are more deaths and hospitalizations that we are monitoring," he said.
                      The Arizona patient, a woman in her late 40s with an underlying lung condition, died last week, the Associated Press reported.
                      Also on Friday, health officials in Nueces County, Texas, announced that state's third swine flu-related death, an unidentified 33-year-old man with multiple underlying health conditions who died May 5 or 6, according to the AP.
                      The two new fatalities come after two others in Texas and one in Washington state. All of the victims had underlying health problems besides the flu.
                      Most cases of swine flu occurring in the United States appear to be mild, health officials said.
                      In fact, "estimates of the confirmed and probable cases in the United States is probably not the best indicator of transmission at this point," the CDC's Jernigan said. "The outbreak is not localized, but is spreading and appears to be expanding throughout the United States. This is an ongoing public health threat."
                      It's a little hard to estimate the number of people who may be infected with swine flu, Jernigan said, "but if we had to make an estimate, I would say that the amount of activity we are seeing with our influenza-like illness network is probably upwards of 100,000."
                      Jernigan said there also seems to be more cases of flu generally in the United States -- both the seasonal and the new H1N1 swine flu -- than is usually seen at this time of the year. "There are 22 U.S. states that are reporting widespread or regional influenza activity, which is something that we would not expect at this time," he said.
                      In other news, the CDC on Friday lifted its general warning that Americans avoid non-essential travel to Mexico, considered the origin and epicenter of the outbreak. Instead, the warning has been downgraded to a "precaution" that now advises people who might be at high risk for complications from the flu to reconsider travel to Mexico.
                      But in a troubling sign that the swine flu outbreak has yet to run its current course in the United States, three New York City public schools were closed Thursday after dozens of flu-like infections surfaced and an assistant principal was in critical condition on a ventilator, according to published reports.
                      New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said four students and the assistant principal at a Queens middle school had diagnosed cases of swine flu. More than 50 students went home sick Thursday with flu-like symptoms. At another middle school in Queens, more than 200 students were absent Thursday, and dozens more were sick at an elementary school, The New York Times and the AP reported.
                      The assistant principal reportedly had underlying health problems before he fell ill. The students who have taken sick in this latest round of infections seem to be experiencing mild symptoms, similar to routine flu, as has been the case for most people in the United States touched by the swine flu.
                      When the outbreak began more than three weeks ago, hundreds of students and staffers at St. Francis Preparatory School, also in Queens, were sickened. Reports at the time said several St. Francis students had spent spring vacation in Cancun, Mexico. Mexico is believed to be the source of the global outbreak that has now infected more than 7,000 people worldwide.
                      Vaccine manufacturers and other health experts met Thursday at the World Health Organization headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, to plot potential strategies to combat the swine flu virus.
                      The AP reported that drug companies were ready to start producing a swine flu vaccine, but many questions remain. They include how many doses to produce, particularly in relation to needed doses of seasonal flu vaccine.
                      The expert group's recommendations will be forwarded to the WHO's director-general, Margaret Chan, who is expected to issue advice to vaccine manufacturers and the World Health Assembly next week, the AP said.
                      But at least one infectious-disease expert said it was a "foregone conclusion" that drug manufacturers would be told to proceed with a vaccine for the H1N1 flu.
                      "If we don't invest in an H1N1 (swine flu) vaccine, then possibly we could have a reappearance of this virus in a mild, moderate, or catastrophic form and we would have absolutely nothing," said Dr. David Fedson, a vaccine expert and former professor of medicine at the University of Virginia.
                      One factor complicating a decision is that most flu vaccine companies can only make limited amounts of both seasonal flu vaccine and pandemic vaccine, such as that needed for swine flu, and not at the same time. The producers also can't make large quantities of both types of vaccine because that would exceed manufacturing capacity, the AP said.
                      Testing has found that the swine flu virus remains susceptible to two common antiviral drugs, Tamiflu and Relenza, according to the CDC.
                      On Friday, the CDC was reporting 4,714 U.S. cases of swine flu in 47 states, and four deaths. For the most part, the infections continue to be mild -- similar to seasonal flu -- and recovery is fairly quick.
                      The World Health Organization on Saturday was reporting 8,451 confirmed cases in 36 countries.
                      The swine flu is a highly unusual mix of swine, bird and human flu viruses. Experts worry that, if the new flu virus mutates, people would have limited immunity to fight the infection.
                      The CDC is concerned with what will happen as this new virus moves into the Southern Hemisphere, where the flu season is about to start. The agency is also preparing for the virus' likely return in the fall to the Northern Hemisphere.
                      <!--flu table begins here--><TABLE cellPadding=3 border=1><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE class=articletext cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=3 align=right border=0><TBODY><TR><TH vAlign=top noWrap align=middle colSpan=4>U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
                      (As of May 15, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)</TH></TR><TR><TH vAlign=top noWrap>States</TH><TH vAlign=top># of
                      confirmed and
                      probable cases</TH><TH vAlign=top colSpan=2>Deaths</TH></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Alabama
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      55
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Arkansas
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      2
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Arizona
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      435
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2>
                      1
                      </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      California
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>504</TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Colorado
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      55
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Connecticut
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      47
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Delaware
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>60</TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Florida
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      68
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Georgia
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      18
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Hawaii
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      10
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Idaho
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      5
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Illinois
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      638
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Indiana
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      71
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Iowa
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      66
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Kansas
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      30
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Kentucky**
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      13
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Louisiana
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      57
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Maine
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      14
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Maryland
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      28
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Massachusetts
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>135</TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Michigan
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>142</TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Minnesota
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      36
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Missouri
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      19
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Montana
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>4</TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Nebraska
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      27
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Nevada
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      26
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      New Hampshire
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      18
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      New Jersey
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      14
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      New Mexico
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      68
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      New York
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      242
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      North Carolina
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      12
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      North Dakota
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      2
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Ohio
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>14</TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Oklahoma
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      26
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Oregon
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      94
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Pennsylvania
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      47
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Rhode Island
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      8
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      South Carolina
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      36
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      South Dakota
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      4
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Tennessee
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      74
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Texas
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      506
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2>
                      2
                      </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Utah
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      91
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Vermont
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      1
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Virginia
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      21
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Washington
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      246
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2>
                      1
                      </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap>
                      Washington, D.C.
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle>
                      12
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=yellow>
                      Wisconsin
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top align=middle bgColor=yellow>
                      613
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=yellow colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top scope=row noWrap bgColor=lightgrey>
                      TOTAL*(47)
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top noWrap bgColor=lightgrey>
                      4,714 cases
                      </TD><TD vAlign=top noWrap bgColor=lightgrey colSpan=2>
                      4 deaths
                      </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top colSpan=4>*includes the District of Columbia
                      **One case is resident of Ky. but currently hospitalized in Ga. Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
                      </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><!--flu table ends here-->More information
                      For more on swine flu, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

                      </TD></TR><TR><TD width=475 colSpan=3>Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.
                      </TD></TR><TR align=middle><TD width=475 colSpan=3><HR></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
                      http://www.ajc.com/health/content/sh...c-/627172.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: A flu hits Phoenix Elementary 191 out Monday

                        Its on today's CDC update.

                        http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htm

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: A flu hits Phoenix Elementary 191 out Monday

                          <TABLE class=spanish2 cellSpacing=5 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=bodySmall>Pima County Health Department H1N1 Updates:

                          May 19, 2009 2:33 p.m. -
                          Pima County’s confirmed case count is holding at 76…for the State, the confirmed case count is 328…70% of the confirmed cases occurred in children less than 18 years old…the second death in Arizona occurred in an individual residing on the Gila River Indian Reservation in Pinal county…to date there have been no deaths from the H1N1 Influenza in Pima County.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

                          The Pima County Health Department continues to carefully monitor the cases of H1N1 Influenza (Swine Flu) nationwide. For updates on confirmed cases visit the websites and resources on this page.

                          http://www.pimahealth.org/disease/sw...u_arizona.html

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