Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

    Snip of PLOS article, on "next-generation-syndromic-surveillance"

    This snip is pointing to relevant studies during the early phase of the 1st wave of the current H1N1 pandemic
    .

    In the early phase of the 2009 A (H1N1) pandemic a marked increase in severity and a shift in the age distribution toward younger persons was found [2], with higher severity reported in patients with pre-existing medical conditions and pregnant women [3][4][5].

    Consistent with previous pandemics, the age and clinical history of the patients play a critical role in the morbidity and mortality associated with the pandemic virus.

    The reasons for the variable morbidity and mortality are unclear, and several hypothesis need to be considered, including the genetics of the virus, the genetics of the host, clinical history of the patient, secondary infections, and environmental factors.


    2
    Centers for Diseases Control, Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infections in Three Pregnant Women --- United States, April--May 2009, MMWR May 15, 2009 / 58(18);497-500.

    3
    Bao Y., P. Bolotov, D. Dernovoy, B. Kiryutin, L. Zaslavsky, T. Tatusova, J. Ostell, and D. Lipman. The Influenza Virus Resource at the National Center for Biotechnology Information. J. Virol. 2008 Jan;82(2):596-601.

    4
    Trifonov V, Khiabanian H, Rabadan R. Geographic Dependence, Surveillance, and Origins of the 2009 Influenza A (H1N1) Virus. The New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 360 ? May 28, 2009 ? Number 22.

    5
    Garten RJ, Davis CT, Russell CA, Shu B, Lindstrom S, Balish A, et al. Antigenic and Genetic Characteristics of Swine-Origin 2009 A(H1N1) Influenza Viruses Circulating in Humans. Science. 22 May 2009,DOI: 10.1126/science.1176225 
18.

    "Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights that must be our call to arms"
    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

      Update from US;

      As of August 21, 2009, 7,983 hospitalizations and 522 deaths (11 deaths in individuals 0-4 years, 77 deaths in individuals 5-24 years, 222 deaths in adults 25-49 years, 145 deaths in adults 50-64 years, 51 deaths in adults age 65 and older, and 16 deaths for which age was no reported) associated with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus have been identified by CDC and state and local public health departments.
      Learn more about the weekly influenza surveillance report (FluView) prepared by the Influenza Division.


      Since 37 pediatric deaths have been recorded, the breakdown is as follows (change from prev. week);

      0-4: 11 (+1)
      5-18: 26 (+3)
      19-24: 51 (+7)
      25-49: 222 (+19)
      50-64: 145 (+10)
      65+: 51 (+6)
      Unk.: 16 (-1)
      Twitter: @RonanKelly13
      The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

        Source: http://www.enewspf.com/index.php?opt...temid=88890169

        H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) - CDC Statistical Update, August 28, 2009
        Friday, 28 August 2009 16:06 Press Release H1N1 Virus (Swine Flu)


        Atlanta, GA-- (ENEWSPF)--August 28, 2009. According to data reported to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) as of 4 PM (ET) on August 27, 2009, 51 U.S. states and territories have reported 8,842 hospitalized cases of H1N1 influenza and 555 deaths. Reported data includes the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. State-specific data is available on the web sites for your local state health department.

        CDC discontinued reporting of individual confirmed and probabl cases of H1N1 influenza on July 24, 2009. The CDC will report the total number of hospitalizations and deaths weekly and continue to use its traditional surveillence systems to track the progress of the H1N1 outbreak.

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

          Swine Flu Infects Children 14 Times More Than Elderly (Update1)


          By Tom Randall

          Aug. 27 (Bloomberg) -- Children were 14 times more likely to be sickened by swine flu than adults 60 and older, the age group that is typically the most at risk for influenza, according to a U.S. study of the disease.

          Children ages 5 to 14 became ill with swine flu, also known as H1N1, at a rate of 147 per 100,000 people, according to the study of 1,557 confirmed illnesses, including seven deaths, in Chicago from April to July, months when the flu virus usually doesn?t spread.

          The findings were reported today by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

          U.S. health officials are planning a vaccination campaign that will focus on those who are disproportionately affected by H1N1, which include children, pregnant women and adults with underlying health conditions.

          A separate CDC study released today from New Zealand showed swine flu targeted younger people and dominated other virus strains after circulating for just one month during the winter, when influenza is more active.

          ?Like other Southern Hemisphere countries with temperate climates, New Zealand entered its winter season with co- circulation of both seasonal and 2009 pandemic influenza strains,? said the authors of today?s report, published in the CDC?s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. ?The number of viruses identified as 2009 pandemic influenza rapidly overtook the number identified as seasonal influenza.?


          "Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights that must be our call to arms"
          Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

          ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

            US update as of Sep 4th;

            As of September 4, 2009, 9,079 hospitalizations and 593 deaths (16 deaths in individuals 0-4 years, 93 deaths in individuals 5-24 years, 249 deaths in adults 25-49 years, 171 deaths in adults 50-64 years, 57 deaths in adults age 65 and older, and 7 deaths for which age was no reported) associated with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus have been identified by CDC and state and local public health departments (http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/update.htm)

            Since 43 pediatric deaths are reported, the breakdown is as follows (change from 8/21);

            0-4: 16 (+5)
            5-18: 27 (+1)
            19-24: 66 (+15)
            25-49: 249 (+27)
            50-64: 171 (+26)
            65+ : 57 (+6)
            Unk: 7 (-9)
            Twitter: @RonanKelly13
            The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

              From a Mumbai study released Sep 5th;

              The BMC based its findings on 629 swine flu patients (the figure available till Thursday evening). While 453 patients were adults, 176 were from the age group of 0-14; the 15-24 age group contributed 184 patients and 166 were between the ages of 25 and 34. An analysis revealed that the 15-34 age group had the maximum number of patients (349 or 55% of the total number).

              "But patients from this category have also recovered very quickly. This is the most mobile age group and so catching the virus is easy; but all have recovered,'' additional civic chief Manisha Mhaiskar said.
              Only 11.13% of those who tested positive for swine flu in the city had travelled abroad or to Pune, the epicentre of swine flu in Maharashtra, an anal
              Twitter: @RonanKelly13
              The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu



                Translation: Spanish ? English

                National

                Influenza A: 40% of cases between 10 and 29 years

                MSP confirmed 400 cases and ensures that the virus decreases


                According to the latest report on the influenza A (H1N1) reported yesterday by the Ministry of Public Health (MOPH), the incidence of the virus in Uruguay is in "decline", recorded in August almost half of consultations in July, month peak disease.

                The report added that from May 27 until 28 August, laboratory-confirmed 400 cases of infection by new viruses.

                The largest number of cases is concentrated between 10 and 29. This age range recorded almost 40% of confirmed cases.


                In relation to deaths from new viruses, the MSP insists that it has formed a committee which is reviewing the medical records of patients who died from respiratory causes, but clarifies that this work is not completed.

                The report does not update the death toll from influenza A. According to the latest figures, the death toll stood at more than 30 people.

                The new flu was spread throughout the country, cases were reported in all departments. In Montevideo, the vast majority were registered, 235 cases and 115 remains Cologne. Flores department reported a single case.

                According to MSP, the demand for health care was not above the usual level of demand, and is below the maximum capacity of health services since it never exceeded 80%. The average hospital bed occupancy due to respiratory diseases was 75.1% and 78.3% in the ICU.


                El Pais Digital

                credits Tonka
                "Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights that must be our call to arms"
                Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

                  Analysis of fatalities in Maharashtra India:

                  Gokhale provided a detailed analysis of 117 deaths since August 3. "Of these, 70 were in the 16-45 age group,'' she said. Other groups included 14 children in the 0-5 age group, 10 in the 6-15 age group and 22 in the 46-65 age group. "In Maharashtra, maximum deaths are seen in the productive age group of 15-45 age group. This in a contrast to the Western countries where maximum deaths are seen in the elderly,'' she said.
                  snipped from;
                  The city and its suburbs registered three deaths due to H1N1 even as the state announced steps to contain a possible second wave of the swine flu epid


                  Somebody should probably let chief secretary (health) Sharwaree Gokhale know that the pattern is the same as seen elsewhere for H1N1.
                  Twitter: @RonanKelly13
                  The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

                    US flu study confirms H1N1 more serious in youth

                    Thu Oct 8, 2009

                    * 45 percent of those hospitalized were under 18

                    * Diarrhea, vomiting in 42 percent of children with H1N1

                    * Quick drug treatment may save lives


                    By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Editor

                    WASHINGTON, Oct 8 (Reuters) - A study of people who became seriously ill and died with the new pandemic swine flu confirms it is hitting a younger population than the seasonal flu and causes often different symptoms.

                    The study of 272 patients sick enough to be hospitalized showed about 40 percent had diarrhea and vomiting -- usually rare with seasonal flu -- and confirmed that quick treatment with antivirals could save lives.

                    Dr. Seema Jain of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who led the study, said the findings had informed the CDC's advice on who should worry about the new H1N1 virus and when to get treatment.

                    "Of the 272 patients we studied, 25 percent were admitted to an intensive care unit and 7 percent died," Jain's team wrote in the report, published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

                    They said 45 percent were children under 18, just 5 percent were over 65 and 73 percent had at least one underlying condition such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease and pregnancy.

                    The soonest any of the patients who died were treated with an antiviral drug was three days after they started showing symptoms, the researchers found
                    . Patients treated earlier all survived.

                    Roche AG's (ROG.VX) Tamiflu or GlaxoSmithKline's (GSK.L) Relenza should be given within 48 hours of symptoms to be the most effective. But Jain said it was never too late to try.

                    "We really believe that antivirals should be started as soon as possible in patients who are hospitalized," Jain said in a telephone interview.

                    Even if patients do not have the traditional risk factors for serious disease, they should get antiviral drugs if they are sick enough to be hospitalized, Jain said.

                    FEVER AND COUGH

                    The cases her team examined represented about a quarter of the hospitalized H1N1 patients in the United States between May 1 and June 9 of this year, before the epidemic was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization.

                    All the patients had fever and cough, 42 percent of the children had diarrhea or vomiting, and all of the patients 65 and older had an underlying condition. Some studies suggest people born before 1952 have some immunity to the H1N1 virus.

                    Of those whose height and weight were available, 29 percent were obese and 26 percent were morbidly obese. Jain said the percentage of people who were obese reflected the general U.S. population, but only 5 percent of the population is morbidly obese.

                    Some other studies have suggested that morbid obesity -- defined as having a body mass index or BMI of 40 or higher -- may raise a person's risk of serious complications and death from H1N1. Jain said that question needed more study.

                    The study found that 7 percent of the hospitalized patients died, and all of those who died had been on ventilators. Those who died ranged in age from 1 year to 57 years.

                    Those who died were more likely to have been short of breath, to have pneumonia, a neurological disorder or acute respiratory distress syndrome. They were also less likely to have received a seasonal flu vaccine over the past year.

                    In its weekly report on death and disease, another CDC team found that 41 percent of children aged 6 months to 2 years got a seasonal flu vaccine last year, 32 percent of 2- to 4-year-olds, 20 percent of other children aged up to 17, 32 percent of young adults, 42 percent of 50- to 64-year-olds and 67 percent of those over 65 -- who have the highest risk of severe illness or death from seasonal flu.

                    "Addressing chronic disease is an issue of human rights that must be our call to arms"
                    Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief The Lancet

                    ~~~~ Twitter:@GertvanderHoek ~~~ GertvanderHoek@gmail.com ~~~

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu



                      Critically Ill Patients With 2009 Influenza A(H1N1) Infection in Canada

                      Some good "pictures" in it.
                      I let you choose what is interesting for you
                      Last edited by Anne; October 12, 2009, 01:53 PM. Reason: typo

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

                        Thanks Anne for posting the link.

                        Most important quote in the article:

                        Our data suggest that severe disease and mortality in the current<sup> </sup>outbreak is concentrated in relatively healthy adolescents and<sup> </sup>adults between the ages of 10 and 60 years, a pattern reminiscent<sup> </sup>of the W-shaped curve previously seen only during the 1918 H1N1<sup> </sup>Spanish pandemic.<sup></sup>
                        http://novel-infectious-diseases.blogspot.com/

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

                          Thank you for this; it is more useful than any other report I've read here.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

                            From India;

                            Click image for larger version

Name:	big_age.gif
Views:	1
Size:	12.8 KB
ID:	650431

                            Click image for larger version

Name:	cfr.gif
Views:	1
Size:	27.5 KB
ID:	650432

                            Twitter: @RonanKelly13
                            The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

                              Am I reading this wrong? But it seems the India data is directly opposite than the data from North America.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Re: Tracking the World Wide Age Distribution of Swine Flu

                                Top graph shows whose getting infected, (mostly 5-40)

                                Bottom graph shows cfr for those groups. Old and young still the most vulnerable. I think that's similar to the US.
                                Twitter: @RonanKelly13
                                The views expressed are mine alone and do not represent the views of my employer or any other person or organization.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X